Public Policy

One of the Alliance’s most important missions is to advocate for aging research by working with legislators, health experts and other like-minded organizations. Our public policy efforts are summarized here.

Other Policy Priorities

Press Room

Tweets Do Tell: Alzhemier's Not a High Priority for Research Funding

Type: Aging Today

Author: Cynthia Bens, VP of Public Policy

Date: May 13th, 2013

An article by Cynthia Bens, Alliance vice president of public policy

Publications



Public Comments

S-FAR's PATH Act Letter

Author: S-FAR

Date: 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research signed onto the U.S. Stakeholder Forum for Antibiotic Resistance (S-FAR) sign-on letter for the Senate HELP Committee, supporting S.185, the Promise for Antibiotics and Therapeutics for Health (PATH) Act. 



Public Comments

Coalition for Health Funding Letter

Author: Coalition for Health Funding

Date: 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a Coalition for Health Funding letter in support of increasing the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and related agencies appropriations subcommittee, to increase the 302(b) allocations for the agencies under the subcommittee's jurisdiction. 






Public Comments

Letter to Sen. Coons and Schatz Regarding OMB M 12 M Memo

Author: Various

Date: 2015

This letter from a group of organizations including the Alliance thanks U.S. Sens Chris Coons and Brian Schatz for "championing the amendment to provide the Office of Management and Budget the flexibility to update its M-12-12 memo during the recent markup of the FY 2016 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act."



Public Comments

Protect Medical Innovation Act of 2015 Letter

Author: Cynthia Bens

Date: 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research submitted a letter to the Committee on Ways and Means to advocate for the Protect Medical Innovation Act of 2015. The bill amends the Internal Revenue code to repeal the excise tax on medical device manufacturers and importers. 




Public Comments

LCAO Older Americans Act Letter

Date: 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a letter in supporting S. 192, the bipartisan Older Americans Act of 2015, a bill that would ensure the important continuity of Older Americans Act (OAA) programs and services for three years. 




Public Comments

Government Employee Travel Restriction Letter

Author: AAAS

Date: 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a letter drafted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) expressing concern on the impact of the Administration's regulations and legislative initiatives related to restricting government employee travel to scientific conferences. 






Public Comments

FY16 Afib Appropriations Sign-On Letter

Date: 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed onto a letter requesting the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and other relevant NIH agencies, institutes, and offices provide technical assistance and otherwise support an effort to improve prevention of AFib-related stroke in older persons.





Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation--2012

Date: 2012

September 28, 2012

Agency for Health Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC Mail code: BICC 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Oregon 97239-3098
Re: Draft Report on Comparative Effectiveness Review (CER) of Stroke Prevention in Atrial
Fibrillation
 

Dear Sir or Madam,

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, was formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for older patients with AFib. We submitted comments to the Agency for Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) in October of 2011 on the importance of reviewing both stroke and bleeding risk assessment tools in the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness study of stroke prevention in AFib, and we appreciate the opportunity to provide additional comments on the findings included in the draft report.



Public Comments

PQRS Submitted Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Date: 2012

September 4, 2012

Marilyn Tavenner
Acting Administrator
 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Department of Health and Human Services
Attn: CMS-1590-P P.O. Box 8013
Baltimore, MD 21244-8013

 RE: Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Dear Administrator Tavenner:

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess both stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for patients with AFib. We appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Our comments on the proposed rule will be limited to a new measure #1525, Chronic Anticoagulation Therapy, which is under consideration by CMS for inclusion in the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) for CY2013. Recent expert consensus led by the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force supports the use of this measure but with an additional recommendation to encourage routine and proper bleeding risk assessment. We urge you to include a modified version of measure #1525 in the final rule that encourages a bleeding risk assessment in addition to a stroke risk assessment to ensure that Medicare beneficiaries with AFib are presented with all treatment options that may be available for them.



Public Comments

PCORI Submitted Comments on National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Date: 2012

March 15, 2012

Joe V. Selby, M.D., M.P.H.
Executive Director
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
1701 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20006

RE: Comments on PCORI National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Dear Dr. Selby:

The groups below comprise a task force of leading organizations in the thrombosis space that are exploring issues related to optimal stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Participants in this task force represent various audiences—from patients to health care providers—that are unified by the desire to improve the way in which stroke and bleeding risk are assessed in atrial fibrillation patients and ensure proper treatment of these patients. In our capacity as health care stakeholders, we support the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s (PCORI) mission to improve health care delivery and outcomes by producing and promoting high integrity, evidence-based information that comes from research guided by patients, caregivers and the health care community. As such we appreciate the opportunity to comment on PCORI’s national research priorities and research agenda.



Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Date: 2011

AHRQ Comments

Home > Aging Topics > Atrial Fibrillation > AHRQ Comments

October 14, 2011
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC
Mail Code: BICC
3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97239-3098

RE: Comment on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Dear Sir or Madam:

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on AHRQ’s key questions related to the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness review of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We believe this is an important time to review in light of the growing impact atrial fibrillation has on our aging population and the uncertainty that exists about the best way to treat older patients with the condition.



Survey

Pain Management Survey

Author: Clarus Research Group

Date: 2009

The Alliance for Aging Research commissioned a nationwide survey of 800 U.S. adults age 65 and older to better understand their attitudes, perceptions and concerns regarding age-related pain management and changes under consideration by the FDA to over-the-counter acetaminophen products. Clarus Research Group conducted the survey on behalf of the Alliance for Aging Research between September 14 and September 18, 2009. Support for the survey was provided by McNeil Consumer Healthcare, Division of McNeil-PPC, Inc.








Blog

Celebrating 50 Years of Medicare and Medicaid

Author: Sarah DiGiovine

Date: July 30th, 2015

Fifty years ago on July 30, President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Social Security Amendments of 1965 leading to the creation of the Medicare and Medicaid programs.


Alliance Applauds Passage of 21st Century Cures Act in House

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: July 10th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research has issued the following statement on the passage of the 21st Century Cures Act, or H.R. 6, today in the U.S. House of Representatives.


Alliance Offers Comment on FDA Testosterone Prescription Labeling Communication

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: March 4th, 2015

Type: Blog Post

We wanted to share our reaction to communication from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regarding updates to the labeling of prescription testosterone products.


Alliance Takes Part in Hill Briefing on Medicare Advantage

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: January 15th, 2015

Type: Article

Yesterday the Alliance had the privilege of participating in a Capitol Hill briefing hosted by the Coalition for Medicare Choices (CMC) on the value of Medicare Advantage.

Newsletter

Highlights from This Year in Public Policy

Date: December 9th, 2015

From Capitol Hill to the NIH to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, it was a busy year for the Alliance on the public policy front.


Q & A with President and CEO Sue Peschin

Date: July 16th, 2014

Sue Peschin shares her first interview as new president and CEO of the Alliance.


Taxes or Medical Research? Tensions Rise in the Battle to Reduce the Deficit

Date: February 1st, 2013

The country did not go over the "fiscal cliff" thanks to the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA), which was passed by Congress on New Year’s Day.  While fears loomed that lawmakers would fail to act in time, ATRA addressed the expiration of numerous tax credits, raised some revenue, and temporarily delayed automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect on December 31, 2012. When ATRA became law America earned a temporary reprieve from imminent economic catastrophe.  However, our health and personal economic security may still suffer from the fallout resulting from actions taken by policymakers struggling to find a more permanent solution to the nation’s fiscal woes.


Battling Health Disparities: Closing the Gaps

Date: July 1st, 2009

Thanks to enormous advances in public health and exciting breakthroughs in medical innovation, over the past century Americans have seen dramatic gains in health and longevity. The United States currently spends more on health care than any other nation and for most people, this means access to one of the best health care systems in the world. Unfortunately, it doesn’t benefit all people equally and the reality is that most minorities have less access to care, fewer options for prevention and treatment, and higher rates of disease and illness.


Pharmaceutical Companies Offer Free Medications to Those in Need

Date: October 1st, 2008

For the 47 million Americans without health insurance, each day is a struggle to find a way to pay for prescription drugs. Older adults, who are often prescribed several medications at a time, can find it even more difficult to pay medical bills. Despite the start of Medicare Part D in 2006, the elderly still spend thousands of dollars a year on prescription drug costs. What many people don’t know is that they may be eligible to receive their medications for free.


Investing for Falls Prevention

Date: July 1st, 2008

Falls are a menace to older adults and our overstrained health care system. The direct medical costs of falls among older adults now total more than $19 billion, most of which must be absorbed by Medicare and Medicaid. A new bill recently passed by Congress seeks to address the problem of falls, but will have little impact without adequate funding.


National Institutes of Health Funding

Date: October 1st, 2005

It’s that time again, the annual struggle over funding for the National Institutes of Health. The latest negotiations between the House and Senate yielded a proposal for an NIH budget increase of one-half of one percent for fiscal year 2006, the smallest increase since the 1970s. But, just before the Thanksgiving recess, the House rejected the bill. The following day, the Senate voted to send the bill back to a conference committee to reach an acceptable compromise.


Medical Errors: How Many is Too Many?

Date: February 1st, 2005

Potentially deadly mistakes continue to plague U.S. hospitals, according to a new report. The study, which analyzed three years of Medicare patient records, estimates that medical errors cause an average of 195,000 in-hospital deaths per year.


Champagne Wishes and Geriatric Dreams

Date: February 1st, 2004

Those inclined to celebrate the just-passed huge and historic expansion of Medicare should pause in their champagne toasts to consider this: most doctors, nurses and other health professionals in the U.S. receive almost no formal training in geriatrics, which seriously undermines the quality of care - especially safe prescription drug therapy - for America's seniors.


First, Do No Harm to Basic Research

Date: February 1st, 2004

President Bush and the Republican Congress are on the verge of wreaking havoc upon on America's preeminent medical research system, at the same depriving themselves of a glowing political legacy.

 


Ageism--Part II: Prevention and Treatment for the Elderly

Date: October 1st, 2003

The perception of older Americans as frail, dependent, and isolated may be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Ageism, this prejudice that subtly dehumanizes older people and influences the way they are treated by society, is the subject of a revealing report published by the Alliance for Aging Research.


It's a Matter of Ageism: Part I

Date: July 1st, 2003

The perception of older Americans as frail, dependent, and isolated may be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Ageism, this prejudice that subtly dehumanizes older people and influences the way they are treated by society, is the subject of a revealing new report published by the Alliance for Aging Research.


Frequently Asked Questions About Therapeutic Clonin

Date: April 1st, 2003

Many of you have probably heard much of the dialogue in the cloning controversy. Between the opinion articles in your local paper and the national news that a religious sect claimed to have successfully cloned a human, cloning technology is often in the news.


This Election's Unhealthy Debate Over Health Care

Date: February 1st, 2003

By Daniel Perry

The just-finished political campaign was a missed opportunity by candidates from both political parties to talk about how to truly improve health in America. Now that Election Day is behind us, let's hope our elected officials can move past the heated rhetoric and start to really make positive changes in the U.S. health care system.


Respect Your Elders

Date: February 1st, 2003

We see them sometimes on the evening news-stories about another scam targeting the elderly or the discovery of an employee physically abusing residents of a long-term care facility. The images are sickening: seniors, often isolated from families and friends, are victimized by opportunistic strangers, caretakers, even family members.


Demand Better Training for Your Healthcare Provider!

Date: April 1st, 2002

Americans over the age of 65 represent over one-half of physician visits annually, yet only a small percent of healthcare professionals actually have specific training to appropriately care for this population.


Where We Stand on Therapeutic Cloning--And Why

Date: April 1st, 2002

The Alliance for Aging Research believes all attempts to clone a human being are dangerous, unethical and wrong at this time. We believe just as strongly that, with appropriate guidelines, U.S. scientists should have the freedom to clone stem cells in laboratory dishes in an attempt to cure serious and life-threatening diseases.


Don't Let Medicare Squelch the Promise of New Medical Technology

Date: February 1st, 2001

When throat cancer forced a Pennsylvania physics professor to have his larynx removed, he thought his lecturing days were over. But a marvelous device called the UltraVoice voice synthesizer has allowed him to speak clearly and remain fully employed.


Lost Opportunities on the Campaign Trail: Candidates Ignore Impending Senior Boom and its Dramatic Impact on Society

Date: October 1st, 2000

Something momentous is about to happen in this country. The largest generation in American history is poised to move into retirement, creating an unprecedented "senior boom." By 2030, there will be an estimated 70 million people over the age of 65, twice as many as there are today.


Championing Human Genome Research: We Need to Keep Urging for Increased Public Support for Research

Date: October 1st, 2000

With all the publicity surrounding the recent mapping of the human genome, it's hard to believe the project was ever less than wildly popular. However, like many other major scientific advances before it, this undertaking initially needed voices to speak out in its support.


Will a Medicare Drug Benefit Help or Hurt?

Date: July 1st, 2000

Congress is trying to repair a 35-year-old shortcoming in the nation's most important health care program for seniors. If they succeed, people on Medicare will have help paying for prescription drugs. It may be the most important action that members of Congress take before they fold their tents and leave Washington this fall.


Prescription for Disaster

Date: May 1st, 2000

By Robert M. Goldberg, Ph.D.

Recently, I overheard a desperate young mother beg her pharmacist to call her doctor for a prescription for Diflucan for her ill daughter. Why was she begging? Because of her short-sighted health care plan. It wouldn't permit her doctor to use Diflucan, the best drug available for treating certain infections, until another, less expensive drug, was tried and failed. Left no choice, the anxious mother sought a refill of the medicine she had been using, a poor "second best." No go. The woman's care plan needed to approve that, too. So what happened? She did what any caring mother with a sick child would have done. The woman shelled out $113 for second best and left, lighter in the pocket, heavier in the heart. Although she was forced to pay big bucks, she still didn't have the reassurance that her ill child was getting the best treatment available.


Lost Independence: A Costly Problem You Can Avoid

Date: October 1st, 1999

Imagine what it must be like to move to a nursing home.


Fight for Your Independence

Date: October 1st, 1999

Personal independence, the capacity to live where you wish, to do the things you want, with the people you want to be with; this is the essence of freedom that we all cherish. But with age, and with the rising risk of chronic diseases, these essential freedoms become even more precious.


Stem Cells, Small in Size, Big in Hope

Date: May 1st, 1999

Imagine a world without debilitating costly diseases such as Parkinson's, heart disease and diabetes. It may be possible because of research into human embryonic stem cells. These tiny biological units pack a very big punch. They have unlimited potential to divide, retain the characteristics of "young" cells and become almost any tissue in the body.

Living Longer & Loving It

Sign up for our electronic newsletter Living Longer & Loving It