Cardiovascular Disease

Cardiovascular disease, also called heart disease, is the #1 cause of death in America, for both men and women. This includes heart attack, ischemic stroke, heart failure, irregular heartbeat, heart valve problems, and more. The Alliance has a wide array of resources on these topics, including short films on living with atrial fibrillation, a quiz to test your valve disease knowledge, and more. 

Explore more materials on AFib and valve disease, and visit our new site, www.LivingwithValveDisease.com, to learn more about living with valve disease and to read about others’ experiences.

Related Pages

National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day

Date: August 24th, 2016

The Alliance partnered with 29 other national organizations to have National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day officially recognized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  Beginning annually on February 22, 2017, the day will be listed on the HHS National Health Observances Calendar.

 


Press Kit for Living with AFib Campaign

Date: February 20th, 2015

Welcome to the Living with AFib press kit. Here you will find all you need on the campaign and the AFib survey results.


Press Kit for Living with VTE Campaign

Date: January 9th, 2015

Welcome to the press kit for the Living with VTE multimedia campaign.


Atrial Fibrillation

Date: October 6th, 2014

These resources will educate you about living with atrial fibrillation. 


Geriatric Cardiovascular Disease

Date: September 25th, 2014

Most cardiovascular diseases are in fact diseases of aging.  The resources on this page look at a number of cardiovascular diseases including atrial fibrillation, aortic stenosis and other types of valve disease, and venous thromboembolism.


Atrial Fibrillation: Stroke Prevention in Older Adults

Date: May 23rd, 2014

Every year around 75,000 Americans learn that they have atrial fibrillation (AFib)—the most common type of arrhythmia, or abnormal heart rhythm. Visit this page to learn more.


Aortic Stenosis: A Heart Valve Disease

Date: April 25th, 2014

Aortic stenosis is a type of heart disease where the main outlet for blood to be pumped to the body—the aortic valve—becomes narrowed over time. Visit this page to learn more.

Press Room

Statement in Support of House Hearing, 'Examining Ethical Responsibilities Regarding Attorney Advertising'

Author: Susan Peschin, MHS

Date: June 23rd, 2017

Alliance for Aging Research President and CEO Susan Peschin, MHS, has issued the following statement in support of a June 23, 2017, hearing being held by the United States House of Representatives’ Judiciary Committee, Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice, titled “Examining Ethical Responsibilities Regarding Attorney Advertising."


Alliance for Aging Research, Relevate Health Group Partner to Raise Awareness about Deep Vein Thrombosis, Venous Thromboembolism

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: March 10th, 2017

Washington, D.C., March 9, 2017 - The Alliance for Aging Research (Alliance) is partnering with Relevate Health Group® to raise awareness about deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and venous thromboembolism (VTE) in honor of Deep Vein Thrombosis Awareness Month in March and World Thrombosis Day on October 13.

Deep vein thrombosis is a blood clot that develops in a deep vein in the body—usually within muscles. The most common place for DVT to develop is in the veins of the legs or pelvis, but it can also occur in the arms, brain, or intestines. DVT affects up to two million Americans each year, yet according to a national survey sponsored by the American Public Health Association, around 74 percent of Americans have little to no awareness of the condition.

Pulmonary embolism (PE) occurs when blood clots in the deep veins break free, travel through the circulatory system to the lungs, and lodge in a main artery or arteries, blocking blood flow. This blockage can cause high blood pressure in the lungs. As a result, the heart pumps harder than usual and may enlarge and eventually fail from being overworked.

The occurrence of both DVT and pulmonary embolism together is called venous thromboembolism, and it affects around 600,000 Americans annually.

Throughout March, the Alliance and Relevate are spreading the word through the Relevate Health Group hospital network as well as traditional and social media. They are educating providers and patients with a short “pocket film” on venous thromboembolism that highlights the risks, symptoms, and prevention options for VTE. The full-length Living with VTE and Preventing Deadly Blood Clots “pocket film” is available with closed captioning in both English and Spanish versions. The Alliance is also featuring the film in a digital and radio public service announcement that will run throughout the course of the month.

“We were thrilled to partner with the Alliance for Aging Research to bring their VTE video resources to our hospital network. We are rallying our network to educate patients on VTE prevention and treatment during DVT Awareness Month as well as on World Thrombosis Day later this year. By screening these resources throughout physician offices, closed circuit TV, online, live events, and email, we hope to raise awareness of VTE and ultimately save lives,” states Melissa Neal, account director at Relevate Health Group.

“Blood clots are life-saving when they stop your bleeding. With VTE, clots form when they are not needed and can cause a heart attack, stroke, lung damage, and death. Raising awareness about VTE is vital because it can be prevented and treated when patients know the risk factors and symptoms. We invite patients, their loved ones, and health care professionals to access our free resources and spread the word that life with VTE is possible,” says Sue Peschin, president and CEO of the Alliance for Aging Research.

To see the Alliance's VTE/DVT resources page, please go here.

For more information, please contact Noel Lloyd, Alliance communications director, at 202.370.7852 or through email.

The VTE public service announcements and Relevate collaboration were made possible by unrestricted educational support from Bristol Myers Squibb.

About the Alliance for Aging Research 
The Alliance for Aging Research is the leading nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the pace of scientific discoveries and their application in order to vastly improve the universal human experience of aging and health. The Alliance was founded in 1986 in Washington, D.C., and has since become a valued advocacy organization and a respected influential voice with policymakers. Visit http://www.agingresearch.org for more information.

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First-Ever Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day Puts Condition in National Spotlight

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 22nd, 2017

The first-ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day is being celebrated throughout the country today, as organizations, advocates, and individuals join together to increase recognition about the risks of heart valve disease (HVD) and improve detection and treatment access to ultimately save lives.


First-Ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day Set for February 22, 2017

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: January 4th, 2017

Today, the Alliance for Aging Research (Alliance) announced that February 22, 2017, will serve as the first-ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day, with annual observances to follow. In addition, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) has listed this new awareness day and an accompanying toolkit on its National Health Observances Calendar (NHO).


Press Kit for Take a Closer Look at AMD Campaign

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: October 13th, 2016

This is the press kit for the Alliance for Aging Research's Take a Closer Look at AMD campaign.


Alliance for Aging Research Commits to Celebrating a Year Without a Stroke

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: September 8th, 2016

Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month campaign highlights the risks associated with AFib and encourages doctors and patients to take steps toward preventing strokes. 


Americans Lack Awareness about Heart Valve Disease, New Public Opinion Surveys Find

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: August 31st, 2016

New public opinion surveys released today by the nonprofit Alliance for Aging Research show that public awareness about heart valve disease (HVD) in the U.S. is alarmingly low.


Media Alert: Alliance for Aging Research to Release Results of Public Opinion Surveys on Awareness of and Experiences with Heart Valve Disease

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: August 29th, 2016

This Wednesday, August 31, the Alliance for Aging Research will release the results via webcast of new public opinion surveys that revealed awareness of heart valve disease (HVD) and experiences of HVD patients as they are diagnosed and seek treatment


Press Kit for the Heart Valve Disease Survey

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: August 23rd, 2016

This is the press kit for the Alliance for Aging Research's heart valve disease survey results.


Find Stats on Chronic Diseases of Aging and Medical Innovation at Newly Designed Silver Book® Site

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: August 10th, 2015

Site Includes Data on Cancer, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Vision Loss, and More


A New Online Resource for Those Living with Heart Valve Disease

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: June 1st, 2015

Website Offers Educational Resources, Personal Stories


Survey Reveals How AFib Patients Age 65+ View Risks, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 23rd, 2015

Results Show Patient Concern about Stroke Risk Has Risen Over Time  


Alliance for Aging Research Releases New Educational Resources on Venous Thromboembolism

Date: January 12th, 2015

Multimedia Living with VTE Campaign Includes Pocket Film


Alliance for Aging Research Launches Campaign to Educate about Valve Disease in Women

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: October 6th, 2014

The Alliance for Aging Research announces the launch of a new comprehensive campaign aimed at educating about valve disease in women.


Alliance for Aging Research Gets to the Heart of Aortic Stenosis

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: June 11th, 2014

New Interactive Campaign Offers Information and Education


Alliance for Aging Research Releases Survey of AFib Patients 65+ that Finds Active Participation in Treatment Decisions

Date: November 5th, 2012

One-Third of Surveyed Patients Report that Treatment Decision was Made Jointly with their Health Care Provider


Alliance for Aging Research Releases New Atrial Fibrillation Consensus and Survey; Results Show Less than 50% of Physicians Use Stroke Risk Assessment Tools Regularly

Date: July 19th, 2012

Expert Consensus Statement Recommends Process for Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk for Appropriate Anticoagulant Use


Alliance for Aging Research Announces New Science Advisors

Date: December 20th, 2011

The Alliance for Aging Research has added new members to its Science Advisory Board including a prominent bioethicist, a world-renowned neurologist, a Nobel Prize winner in economics, a leading longevity researcher, and the only cardiologist to receive all four major cardiovascular research awards.


Growing Burden of Thrombosis Calls for Medical Innovation

Date: March 23rd, 2011

New Silver Book® Highlights Need for More Medical Research and Task Force


Aortic Stenosis Campaign Educates Patients and Physicians

Date: November 1st, 2009

Materials Raise Awareness and Encourage Physician-Patient Communication


Alliance Launches Aortic Stenosis Awareness Campaign

Date: October 8th, 2008

Survey Reveals Doctors, Patients Lack Information about Heart Condition


Campaign to Increase Awareness about Heart Disease in Women

Date: September 12th, 2006

In an effort to improve awareness about heart disease in women, the Alliance for Aging Research has launched a new campaign, Heart Disease: About Women, About You.


Americans Not Making Stroke - Irregular Heartbeat Connection

Date: May 5th, 2004

A new survey released today by the not-for-profit Alliance for Aging Research found that most Americans are unaware of one of the strongest risk factors for stroke.

Publications


Health Care Professional Resources

Celebrating a Year Without a Stroke: Tips for you to simply talk with your atrial fibrillation patients about stroke prevention

Date: 2016

The risk of stroke from atrial fibrillation (AFib) is real, and can quickly change a patient's life. As you know, the scientific evidence confirms that oral anticoagulation is highly effective at reducing stroke risk. Yet, elderly patients are too often under-anticoagulted, owing in part to their lack of understanding about stroke risk and the value of anticoagulation. This tip sheet offers talking points to help health care professionals help their patients to better understand why anticoagulation is critical and how adherence will allow them to celebate more years without a stroke.

 




Public Comments

Comments on NHLBI Draft Strategic Research Priorities

Author: Afib Optimal Treatment Taskforce

Date: 2016

Letter to the Office of Science Policy, Engagement, Education, and Communications (OSPEEC) at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) urging the Institute to include the Afib Optimal Treatment Task Force's critical challenge of developing an effective integrated bleeding risk assessment tool as part of the NHLBI's final Strategic Research Priorities. 



Pocket Film

Heart Healthy Aging with Nutrition

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: 2016

Like everything else in our bodies, the cardiovascular (CV) system goes through the aging process. We do know that there are things we can do, however, to positively impact our cardiovascular health. Watch this film to learn more about the aging of our CV system, research on bioactive compounds and how they may help maintain heart health, and a look at how cocoa flavanol supports healthy blood flow.   This film is the third in a series produced in partnership with Mars Center for Cocoa Health Science.  Learn more here.




Public Comments

AFib Healthy People 2020 Letter

Author: AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force

Date: 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research led AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force submitted a letter to the CDC commenting on the agency's Healthy People 2020 goals. The letter recommended:

  • The CDC should add Afib as a modifiable risk factor for stroke
  • The CDC address the under anticoagulation of older AFib patients as an emerging issue in heart disease and stroke




Public Comments

FY16 Afib Appropriations Sign-On Letter

Date: 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed onto a letter requesting the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and other relevant NIH agencies, institutes, and offices provide technical assistance and otherwise support an effort to improve prevention of AFib-related stroke in older persons.





Pocket Film

Living with and Preventing Stroke from Atrial Fibrillation

Date: 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) affects the way blood flows through the heart and makes it vulnerable for forming clots, which can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The risk of stroke in a person with AFib is 500% higher than in someone without the disease, so treatment to reduce stroke risk is essential. Anticoagulants, also called blood thinners, can help reduce the risk of stroke. Fatal bleeding while on an anticoagulant is rare, and for most AFib patients, the benefit of preventing AFib caused strokes outweighs the increased risk of bleeding. To learn more about stroke risk and AFib, visit our website at www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation

­.

Atrial Fibrillation, also known as AFib, is the most common type of arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat. An estimated 5 million Americans are currently living with AFib, and it becomes more common with age. AFib significantly increases a person’s risk of stroke, so it’s important to recognize its signs and symptoms and to seek treatment to reduce risk. However, it’s important to keep in mind that some people with AFib never experience symptoms, and are diagnosed when a health care professional detects an irregular heartbeat during a routine exam or during a visit for another health condition. Watch this short film to learn about the risk factors, causes, symptoms, and treatment options of AFib. For more information—including a patient brochure and quiz, visit our website at www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation.



Pocket Film

Cómo Prevenir una Apoplejía por Fibrilación Auricular

Date: 2014

La fibrilación auricular (AFib) afecta la manera sangre fluye a través del corazón y lo hace vulnerable para la formación de coágulos, que pueden viajar al cerebro y causar un derrame cerebral. El riesgo de derrame cerebral en una persona con AFib es 500% más alto que en alguien sin la enfermedad, el tratamiento para reducir el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular es esencial. Anticoagulantes, también llamados anticoagulantes, pueden ayudar a reducir el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular. Tiempo hemorragia fatal en un anticoagulante es rara, y para la mayoría de los pacientes AFib, el beneficio de prevenir AFib causado accidentes cerebrovasculares supera el aumento del riesgo de sangrado. Para aprender más sobre el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular y AFib, visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/ atrialfibrillation.



Pocket Film

Cómo Vivir con el Tromboembolismo Venoso y Prevenir Coágulos Sanguíneos Mortales

Date: 2014

El tromboembolismo venoso o TEV, es un término que incluye la trombosis venosa profunda y embolia pulmonar. TEV es común, y la mitad de todos los casos ocurren durante o poco después, una estancia en el hospital. Sin embargo, hay muchos factores, como el aumento de la edad que contribuyen a su riesgo de TEV . TEV es potencialmente peligrosa para la vida y se repite con frecuencia. Vea este cortometraje para averiguar los factores de riesgo, causas , síntomas y opciones de tratamiento de la ETV . Para obtener más información , incluyendo un folleto y concurso paciente , visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/VTE.



Pocket Film

Cómo Vivir con Fibrilación Auricular

Date: 2014

Fibrilación auricular, también conocida como Fib A, es el tipo más común de arritmia, o latidos irregulares del corazón. Se estima que 5 millones de estadounidenses viven actualmente con AFib, y se vuelve más común con la edad. AFib aumenta significativamente el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular de una persona, por lo que es importante reconocer sus signos y síntomas y buscar tratamiento para reducir el riesgo. Sin embargo, es importante tener en cuenta que algunas personas con FibA nunca experimentan síntomas, y se diagnostican cuando un profesional de la salud detecta un latido irregular del corazón durante un examen de rutina o durante una visita para otra condición de salud. Vea este cortometraje para aprender acerca de los factores de riesgo, causas, síntomas y opciones de tratamiento de AFib. Para obtener más información , incluyendo un folleto y concurso paciente , visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation.




Brochure

Living with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib)

Date: 2014

Atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF) is the most common type of irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia.  An estimated five million Americans are currently living with AFib. People with AFib have a higher risk of stroke, heart failure, dementia, other heart-related complications, and even death. Read this brochure to find out more about this condition.



Brochure

Living with Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

Date: 2014

Venous thromboembolism, or VTE, is a term that includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.  It is common--affecting as many as 600,000 Americans.  While approximately half of all cases are related to hospitalization, there are numerous causes and risk factors that may cause VTE in non-hospitalized individuals.

VTE recurs (or happens again) frequently and can cause long-term complications and even death.  However, recognizing symptoms, seeking prompt medical attention, and getting proper treatment can significantly reduce complications and save your life.

Read this brochure to find out more about risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.











Pocket Film

Heart Valve Disease in Women

Date: 2014

Each year, as many as 5 million Americans are diagnosed with heart valve disease--a cardiovascular condition that affects men and women of all ages, but that becomes increasingly more common with age.  An estimated 1 in 50 women have valve disease--growing to 1 in 10 by age 75 and older.

This short "pocket film" teaches women more about valve disease--how you get it, how you detect it, and how you treat it.  

 



Health Care Professional Resources

Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: A pocket guide to current guidelines and recommendations

Date: 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) affects around 5% of patients age 65 and older and 10% of patients age 80 or older.  AFib is associated with a 5-fold risk of stroke so patients with AFib are often treated with anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy, both of which increase the risk of bleeding.  Examining individual patient risk factors can help providers manage bleeding risk while reducing risk of stroke in patients with AFib.  This pocket guide outlines the similarities and differences in current AFib guidelines, as well as efforts from major medical organizations to guide decision-making for stroke prevention in AFib (SPAF).




Fact Sheet

The Silver Book: Atrial Fibrillation fact sheet

Date: 2013

Atrial fibrillation impacts between 2.7 and 6.1 million adults and can lead to stroke, heart failure, dementia, disability, and death. It also costs a tremendous amount of money--at least $6.65 billion each year. This latest factsheet from The Silver Book brings the leading data on the burden of the disease and the value of innovation to reduce that burden, all into one place.



Whitepaper

Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation--Consensus Statement Executive Summary

Date: 2012

This executive summary shares the critical conclusions from the expert consensus statement that makes important recommendations on the use of stroke and bleeding risk tools, the decision to anticoagulate, the incorporation of patient preferences, and more.  Read the full consensus here

The experts include Mark J. Alberts, MD; Mary Amantangelo, MS, ACNP-BC, CCRN; Kenneth A. Bauer, MD; Lynne T. Braun, PhD, CNP, FAHA; Henry I. Bussey, PharmD; A. John Camm, MD, QHP, FRCP, FACC, FESC, FMedSci, FHRS, CStJ; David Garcia, MD; Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD; Jonathan L. Halperin, MD; Mellanie True Hills; Alan K. Jacobson, MD; Gregory Y.H. Lip, MD, FRCP, FESC, FACC; Edith A. Nutescu, PharmD, FCCP; Daniel E. Singer, MD; Albert L. Waldo, MD, FACC, FAHA, FHRS, FAACP



Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation--2012

Date: 2012

September 28, 2012

Agency for Health Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC Mail code: BICC 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Oregon 97239-3098
Re: Draft Report on Comparative Effectiveness Review (CER) of Stroke Prevention in Atrial
Fibrillation
 

Dear Sir or Madam,

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, was formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for older patients with AFib. We submitted comments to the Agency for Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) in October of 2011 on the importance of reviewing both stroke and bleeding risk assessment tools in the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness study of stroke prevention in AFib, and we appreciate the opportunity to provide additional comments on the findings included in the draft report.



Public Comments

PQRS Submitted Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Date: 2012

September 4, 2012

Marilyn Tavenner
Acting Administrator
 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Department of Health and Human Services
Attn: CMS-1590-P P.O. Box 8013
Baltimore, MD 21244-8013

 RE: Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Dear Administrator Tavenner:

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess both stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for patients with AFib. We appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Our comments on the proposed rule will be limited to a new measure #1525, Chronic Anticoagulation Therapy, which is under consideration by CMS for inclusion in the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) for CY2013. Recent expert consensus led by the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force supports the use of this measure but with an additional recommendation to encourage routine and proper bleeding risk assessment. We urge you to include a modified version of measure #1525 in the final rule that encourages a bleeding risk assessment in addition to a stroke risk assessment to ensure that Medicare beneficiaries with AFib are presented with all treatment options that may be available for them.





Whitepaper

Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation—Consensus Statement

Date: 2012

This expert consensus statement makes important recommendations on the use of stroke and bleeding risk tools, the decision to anticoagulate, the incorporation of patient preferences, and more.  Read an executive summary.

The experts include Mark J. Alberts, MD; Mary Amantangelo, MS, ACNP-BC, CCRN; Kenneth A. Bauer, MD; Lynne T. Braun, PhD, CNP, FAHA; Henry I. Bussey, PharmD; A. John Camm, MD, QHP, FRCP, FACC, FESC, FMedSci, FHRS, CStJ; David Garcia, MD; Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD; Jonathan L. Halperin, MD; Mellanie True Hills; Alan K. Jacobson, MD; Gregory Y.H. Lip, MD, FRCP, FESC, FACC; Edith A. Nutescu, PharmD, FCCP; Daniel E. Singer, MD; Albert L. Waldo, MD, FACC, FAHA, FHRS, FAACP





Public Comments

PCORI Submitted Comments on National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Date: 2012

March 15, 2012

Joe V. Selby, M.D., M.P.H.
Executive Director
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
1701 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20006

RE: Comments on PCORI National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Dear Dr. Selby:

The groups below comprise a task force of leading organizations in the thrombosis space that are exploring issues related to optimal stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Participants in this task force represent various audiences—from patients to health care providers—that are unified by the desire to improve the way in which stroke and bleeding risk are assessed in atrial fibrillation patients and ensure proper treatment of these patients. In our capacity as health care stakeholders, we support the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s (PCORI) mission to improve health care delivery and outcomes by producing and promoting high integrity, evidence-based information that comes from research guided by patients, caregivers and the health care community. As such we appreciate the opportunity to comment on PCORI’s national research priorities and research agenda.



Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Date: 2011

AHRQ Comments

Home > Aging Topics > Atrial Fibrillation > AHRQ Comments

October 14, 2011
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC
Mail Code: BICC
3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97239-3098

RE: Comment on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Dear Sir or Madam:

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on AHRQ’s key questions related to the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness review of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We believe this is an important time to review in light of the growing impact atrial fibrillation has on our aging population and the uncertainty that exists about the best way to treat older patients with the condition.



Fact Sheet

The Facts About AFib

Date: 2011

The most common type of arrhythmia—or abnormal heart rhythm—atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a disorder of the heart’s electrical system that affects an estimated 2.3 to 5.6 million people in the US. During AFib episodes the heart’s upper chambers (the atria) beat irregularly and out of sync with the heart’s lower chambers (the ventricles). In some people these episodes come and go. In others they are chronic and occur regularly. In both cases, the arrhythmia itself isn’t generally serious; however, abnormal blood flow and strain to the heart can lead to serious medical conditions.

Download to learn more about what it means to have AFib, risk factors, treatment options, and making the right treatment decision for you.



Volume

The Silver Book: Thrombosis

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: 2011

Each year around 75,000 Americans are diagnosed with AFib, 900,000 experience a VTE event, adn 800,000 have a stroke.  Some 2 million Americans die from thrombosis or its consequences.  The burden for those who survive is enormous and the cost of care a major expense for individuals and the nation.  Stroke alone costs around $73.7 billion annually.  Fortunately research advances are offering significant hope.  

This volume of The Silver Book shares the facts and statistics on the burden of thrombosis, as well as the progress and potential of research in the field.



Whitepaper

AFib Optimal Treatment Expert Roundtable--Effecting Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Anticoagulation Decision-Making

Date: 2011

This roundtable explored the risk assessment tools and their limitations, discussed how the tools should be updated to overcome those limitations and to reflect the data from emerging therapies, formed consensus on what steps should be taken to address any proposed guideline changes and call for mandates, and considered how best to raise awareness amongst health care professionals on this expert consensus and the need for new best practices.

Read the consensus document that was produced as a result.



Brochure

About Valve Disease: Talking with Your Doctor

Date: 2010

This quick guide to talking wtih your doctor or health care professional about valve disease includes information for patients who think they may have a valve problem, as well as for those who know that they have a type of valve disease.  This resource can help make these important conversations a little bit easier.

A companion piece provides background information on valve disease and its treatment.

You can also visit the Alliance's Valve Disease page to learn more about valve disease, and Aortic Stenosis page to learn more about this common type of valve disease.



Brochure

Heart Valve Disease: Patient Information

Date: 2010

This brochure includes basics on valve disease—what it is, how you get it, how you know you have it, and how it's diagnosed.  It also covers broad treatment options, what to expect after surgery, and a list of helpful resources.

A companion piece provides tips on starting a conversation with your health care professional about valve disease.

You can also visit the Alliance's Valve Disease page to learn more about valve disease, and Aortic Stenosis page to learn more about this common type of valve disease.







Health Care Professional Resources

Women and Heart Disease: What They Need You to Tell Them—A Physician's Guide

Date: 2006

This guide gives tips on starting a heart healthy conversation with patients and helps bridge the awareness gap about women and heart disease.

You can also share this quiz with your patients to help them learn more about their heart health.  That print quiz is also available on-line.

Blog

Today Is World Thrombosis Day

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: October 13th, 2017

Today is World Thrombosis Day, and we are raising awareness.


HROTW: Learn More about "Living With AFib"

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: September 29th, 2017

September is almost over, which means Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month is nearing its end. However, the need to raise awareness about atrial fibrillation (AFib) never ends! For our Health Resource of the Week, we’re sharing a short “pocket film” that highlights the risk factors, symptoms and treatments options for AFib.


Alliance Garners Prestigious Webby, Telly Awards

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: July 11th, 2017

The Alliance is thrilled to announce that its pocket film Safe Medication Disposal has received 2017 Telly and Webby Awards. The Alliance also received a 2017 Telly Award for its short film that tells the story of AFib-stroke survivor Sharon Munson and her husband, Randall.


HROTW: Living with VTE and Preventing Deadly Blood Clots

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: July 7th, 2017

This week, we're highlighting the risk factors and treatment options for venous thromboembolism (VTE). 


Missed Our #YearWithoutAStroke Twitter Chat? Here's A Recap!

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: May 17th, 2017

On May 16, the Alliance for Aging Research and partnering organizations hosted a Twitter chat on the importance of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AFib). If you missed the chat, you can find a recap here!


10 Things to Know About VTE

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: March 17th, 2017

It's Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Awareness Month! Here are ten things you should know about venous thromboembolism.


National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day Featured on Voice of America

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: February 28th, 2017

Alliance President and CEO Sue Peschin was featured on Voice of America to talk about the importance of National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day. Voice of America also featured AHA Ambassadors and a thoracic surgeon to underscore the importance of raising awareness.


ICYMI: The Twitter Chat on #ValveDiseaseDay Is Now Available!

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: February 23rd, 2017

On February 22, a Twitter chat on the first-ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day was hosted by the National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day campaign to highlight the importance of the day, the impact of heart valve disease, and how people can raise awareness.


Educational Lunch Briefing Held for First-Ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: February 23rd, 2017

February 22 marked the first-ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day! To celebrate the day, we held an educational lunch briefing and a Twitter chat. The briefing offered attendees the opportunity to learn about: the latest in heart valve disease research, leading treatments, and inspiring stories from AHA Heart Valve Ambassadors.


From Heart Valve Disease Patient to Awareness Ambassador

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 15th, 2017

Learn how one couple's experience with heart valve disease led them to educate others about the disease through an Ambassador program with the American Heart Association.


Celebrate the First-Ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day on February 22

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: February 13th, 2017

Heart valve disease is a serious disease that affects approximately five million Americans, but many Americans know little about the disease. To raise awareness, we're sponsoring the first-ever National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day on February 22. 


Spread the Love This February

Author: Sarah DiGiovine

Date: February 9th, 2017

Spread the love this February with the gift of heart health for you and your loved ones. Along with Valentine’s Day, February marks American Heart Month and National Heart Valve Disease Awareness Day.


Former Congressman Gingrey: Stronger National Awareness about Heart Valve Disease Needed

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 8th, 2017

More Americans need to know about the effects of heart valve disease.That was the message of an op-ed written by former U.S. Congressman Philip Gingrey, M.D that appeared on The Hill’s website.


Op-Ed Notes Risk of AFib-Related Strokes Among African-Americans

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: January 6th, 2017

Alliance President and CEO Sue Peschin penned an op-ed with the Association of Black Cardiologist's Cassandra A. McCullough on the importance of stroke prevention among African-Americans.


Wall Street Journal Features Ad Celebrating a Year Without a Stroke

Author: Kelsey Allcorn

Date: January 3rd, 2017

We are very excited to have an ad in today’s DC-area Wall Street Journal, where we can help spread the word about our Celebrating A Year Without A Stroke campaign!


Ad in Wall Street Journal Celebrates a Year without a Stroke

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: December 22nd, 2016

As we kick off 2017, the Alliance is encouraging everyone to join us in celebrating a year without a stroke by featuring an ad in The Wall Street Journal.


Resources to Stay Heart Healthy

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: September 29th, 2016

Today is a special day at the Alliance! It’s World Heart Day – a day to increase awareness and prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

 


Webcast on Results of the Alliance's Valve Disease Awareness Survey Now Available

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: September 7th, 2016

Last week, the Alliance held a webcast to discuss new survey results about valve disease awareness in the U.S. and the experiences of valve disease patients as they are diagnosed and seek treatment.


This Infographic Highlights Public Awareness of Heart Valve Disease

Author: Breanna Bishop

Date: August 31st, 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research released the results of new public opinion surveys about heart valve disease (HVD) today. To help illustrate some of the findings from the survey, we have created an infographic.


HROTW: Resources to Keep Your Heart in Rhythm

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: June 7th, 2016

June 6 through 12 is World Heart Rhythm Week, which provides an opportunity for us to learn more about heart rhythm disorders, including atrial fibrillation. So, for our Health Resource of the Week, we present you with our excellent series of educational materials about AFib.


March Is DVT Awareness Month

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: March 15th, 2016

March is National Deep Vein Thrombosis Month. Learn more about DVT with these resources.


Learn about the SPYRAL HTN Global Clinical Trial Program

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: March 9th, 2016

The SPYRAL HTN Global Clinical Trial Program includes two clinical studies that will evaluate Medtronic’s investigational technology for high blood pressure.  


Four Multimedia Resources for Heart Month

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 29th, 2016

As we close out American Heart Month, here are four multimedia resources to keep the learning going.


Four Conditions to Know About for American Heart Month

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 16th, 2016

In recognition of American Heart Month, here are four conditions to know about.


HROTW: Test Your Knowledge of Venous Thromboembolism

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: January 22nd, 2016

Our Health Resource of the Week is a quiz to test your knowledge of venous thromboembolism.  


HROTW: Preventing Stroke from Atrial Fibrillation

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: January 8th, 2016

Our Health Resource of the Week features a video: Preventing Stroke from Atrial Fibrillation.


HROTW: Heart Valve Disease in Women

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: December 3rd, 2015

For our Health Resource of the Week, watch this short "pocket film" about how heart valve disease affects women. It's estimated that one in 50 women have valve disease; this grows to one in 10 for those ages 75 and over.


October 13, World Thrombosis Day

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: October 13th, 2015

Today we join with a host of other organizations in recognition of World Thrombosis Day to focus on thrombosis, an often overlooked disease.


HROTW: Living with AFib Brochure

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: September 4th, 2015

For our Health Resource of the Week, we share a brochure that gives you a complete overview of atrial fibrillation.


Five Ways to Make Yourself Aware about Atrial Fibrillation

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: September 3rd, 2015

All during September, the Alliance joins other organizations to spread the word about atrial fibrillation (AFib), as this is Atrial Fibrillation Awareness Month.  


Upcoming Online Chat Focused on Heart Valve Disease

Author: Kait Reinert

Date: August 17th, 2015

Type: Blog

Cleveland Clinic, a leader in cardiac research, education and health information, will be hosting an Online Health Chat on Heart Valve Disease and Treatments this Tuesday, August 18 at noon ET.


Pocket Films Part of Cardio-Visual App Video Library

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: August 6th, 2015

Four Alliance pocket films have been included in the video library of the Cardio-Visual multimedia platform. 


HROTW: Quiz on Aortic Stenosis

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: July 24th, 2015

For our Health Resource of the Week, we test your knowledge of aortic stenosis.


HROTW: Learn about Heart Valve Disease

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: July 16th, 2015

For our Health Resource of the Week, we join Adam Pick in promoting the importance of heart valve disease education and awareness.


Adam Pick Launches New Campaign about Heart Valve Disease

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: July 13th, 2015

We have partnered with Adam Pick, a nationally known advocate for valve disease awareness and founder of HeartValveSurgery.com, to tell the stories of patients: Linda Kincaid and Nina Bamford.


Four Ways This New Website Educates about Heart Valve Disease

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: June 16th, 2015

We've launched a new website aimed at educating about heart valve disease, a condition affecting more than five million Americans.


HROTW: Valve Disease Quiz

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: June 9th, 2015

We feature a resource to test your knowledge about heart valve disease. More than five million Americans are diagnosed with valve disease each year. 


New Heart Valve Disease Site Helps Make Every Heartbeat Matter

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: June 1st, 2015

Today we have announced the launch of our new Living with Valve Disease website, an online resource hub where people can gather to learn and share about heart valve disease.


Stay Aware about the Dangers of Stroke

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: May 8th, 2015

Stroke is the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S.  In fact, every four minutes someone in the U.S. dies from a stroke. Here are some things to know.


New Educational Videos on Atrial Fibrillation

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 26th, 2015

As part of our recently launched Living with Atrial Fibrillation campaign, we have two educational short videos available that we encourage you to both watch and share.


Learn More about AFib during American Heart Month

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: February 6th, 2015

This February we launched an educational effort on atrial fibrillation. 


What You Need to Know about Venous Thromboembolism

Author: Noel Lloyd

Date: January 14th, 2015

We share some info about a condition that affects 600,000 Americans each year.


Not a Part of Normal Aging

Author: Lindsay Clarke

Date: January 26th, 2010

Even though it’s a serious condition that typically leads to death after the onset of serious symptoms (such as angina and syncope), aortic stenosis (AS) is under-diagnosed—and even more scary—under-treated.


Wear Red for Heart Disease Awareness

Author: Guest Contributor

Date: January 27th, 2009

During the past couple years, you may have noticed red dress pins being worn by women across the country. Maybe you also noticed the red dresses printed on some food labels in your local grocery store. This red dress has become the national symbol for heart disease awareness in women. On February 6, National Wear Red Day, wear red and encourage those around you to talk about heart disease—the number one cause of death for women in the U.S.


Chronic Disease and Depression

Author: Guest Contributor

Date: October 20th, 2008

Two studies have been published recently that talk about depression—but not as a stand-alone diagnosis. They discuss both heart disease and diabetes and the high comorbidity of depression.

Newsletter

A Way to Navigate the Costs of a Heart Valve Diagnosis

Date: December 13th, 2016

The new Financial and Care Support Navigator on the Alliance's Living With Valve Disease website offers those affected by heart valve disease a personalized plan of action to handle the costs of valve disease.


Learning about Heart Valve Disease

Date: December 13th, 2016

In this edition of Science in the Spotlight, we take a closer look at heart valve disease and its causes.


A Key to Successfully Living with Valve Disease? Learning from Others

Date: August 4th, 2015

Heart valve disease affects people of all ages, but is most common among older adults. A diagnosis can be scary. While getting medical care is an essential step, there's another important resource: the experiences of others.


Living with Venous Thromboembolism: What You Need to Know

Date: April 1st, 2015

Venous thromboembolism is the third most common cardiovascular illness in the U.S. Find out more about this dangerous clotting condition.


Alliance Recognizes Heart Month with AFib Campaign

Date: March 31st, 2015

Atrial fibrillation can often go undetected and increases in frequency as we age. Learn how we are educating on this condition. 


The Amazing Human Heart

Date: November 25th, 2014

The human heart is an extraordinary, finely tuned organ. But there are dangers to our heart health, like valve disease.


Recognizing Aortic Stenosis

Date: July 16th, 2014

What is aortic stenosis, and how does it affect older adults?  Learn more here.


The Month of Love and Heart Health

Date: February 1st, 2013

It’s that time of year where people throughout the world exchange candy, flowers, and sentimental gifts with their loved ones, and those that they hope to love.  While many of us believe—especially those who grumble at the thought of the lovey-dovey holiday—that Valentine’s Day was invented by greeting card and chocolate companies to up their profits, it actually has a long, and somewhat dark history.

Heart health advocacy organizations are hoping to add to the history of Valentine’s Day by designating the month of love “heart health month” and making it another reminder of how important it is that we protect and cherish both our loved ones and our hearts.


Know Your Pulse: It Could Save Your Life

Date: October 1st, 2012

Think back and try to remember if your doctor or another health care professional checked your pulse during your last visit? Not with a stethoscope but with their fingers on your wrist? If you’re like many people you’re sure that they listened to your heart and checked your blood pressure, but you’re also pretty sure no one has taken your pulse in a while.

While listening to your heart with a stethoscope helps your doctor evaluate the functioning of your heart and its valves, a simple pulse check can better evaluate your heart’s rate and rhythm.


The Balancing Act: Managing Atrial Fibrillation

Date: July 1st, 2011

Every year around 75,000 Americans learn that they have atrial fibrillation. Some are diagnosed after noticing that their heart is racing or skipping beats. Others feel chest and throat pressure that they think is a heart attack. Or they go to their doctors feeling tired-out and weak all the time. Some feel nothing at all.


Treating Valve Disease: Successful Options for All Patients

Date: May 1st, 2011

Each year, as many as 5 million Americans are diagnosed with valve disease. There are a number of different types of valve disease and all of them involve defects or damage to one or more of the heart’s four valves. While some types are not serious, others can lead to major complications, including death. Fortunately, most valve disease can be successfully treated with surgery in patients of all ages and races.


Aortic Stenosis: Under-Diagnosed and Under-Treated

Date: May 1st, 2010

Aortic stenosis is a type of heart disease where the aortic valve becomes narrowed over time, obstructing blood flow to the body. It is more common with age and if left untreated, can lead to heart disease, significantly decreased quality of life, heart failure, and even death. Fortunately, aortic stenosis (AS) can usually be treated with surgery in patients of all ages.


Keeping Up the Fight Against Heart Disease

Date: July 1st, 2007

Cardiovascular disease is a classic “good news, bad news” story. Although improved treatments have led to lower death rates, an aging and overweight population poses challenges for the U.S. health care system, experts said at a recent briefing in Washington, D.C.
 
 


Atrial Fibrillation

Date: July 1st, 2004

Most of us are happy to make adjustments in our lives now if we know they may reduce our chances of developing health problems later. That's why knowing our risk for medical problems is so important. We may not be able to change certain risk factors, such as age or heredity, but many are within our control.