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A Way to Navigate the Costs of a Heart Valve Diagnosis

Date: December 13th, 2016

So you just got the news from your cardiologist: You have heart valve disease. It’s never easy getting news like this, especially because of the impact it could have on your life. It’s understandable that you are scared and worried about how it will impact your physical health. But you also need to consider the financial impact – something that can cause significant worry and stress. Thankfully there are many resources out there that can help you with the costs of medicine, co-pays,


Learning about Heart Valve Disease

Date: December 13th, 2016

Heart valve disease (HVD) is a condition that involves damage to one or more of the heart’s valves; it affects an estimated five million Americans. While some types are not serious, others can lead to major complications, including about 22,000 deaths per year. Valve disease can be present at birth or develop from damage later in life from calcification, other cardiovascular diseases and conditions, or infection.  Fortunately, valve disease can usually be successfully treated with medications to ease symptoms and reduce


News-At-A-Glance

Date: December 13th, 2016

President Obama signed the 21st Century Cures Act into law on December 13, 2016. The Cures Act will hasten how drugs and medical devices are reviewed and authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Alliance recently released a statement on the Cures Act. Read it here.    Last month, the ACT-AD (Accelerate Cures/Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease) Coalition hosted its Ninth Annual FDA/Alzheimer's Disease Allies Meeting to discuss the current state of Alzheimer's disease treatment development. You can find a full recap


The Alliance Celebrated 30 Years of Advancing Science

Date: December 13th, 2016

The Alliance holds the Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner to bring together outstanding people who help to advance the science of aging. This year’s dinner was particularly special because it marked 30 years since the Alliance was founded. On September 29, the Alliance’s peers and supporters gathered to acknowledge the amazing people who devote their time to bringing aging issues to the forefront. The Alliance was pleased to recognize the Honorable Bill Cassidy, Republican senator from Louisiana, the Honorable Maxine Waters,

Related Topics: Aging Research


The Alliance Releases Community Workshop Kit for Vaccines

Date: December 13th, 2016

Recognizing that older adults face an increased risk for flu-related complications, the Alliance participated in National Influenza Vaccination Week from December 4 – 10. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 54 to 70 percent of flu-related hospitalizations, and 71 to 85 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths occur in people 65 and older. This makes it especially important for older adults to recognize the dangers of the flu, as well as other vaccine-preventable diseases. This is why the


Break Out Your Pantookas and Drums, It is Time to Reauthorize the UFAs

Date: December 13th, 2016

Even if you choose not to celebrate a holiday, it is difficult to ignore that it is the holiday season. That means it is time for our televisions to subject us to no fewer than 25 days of holiday classics. A favorite for many is Dr. Seuss’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas.” In the cartoon adaptation of Dr. Seuss’ book, the lonely and small-hearted Grinch, dressed as Santa Claus, carries out an evening of indiscriminate pilfering of precious belongings across


Save the SHIP

Date: August 4th, 2016

In an era of increasing constraints on federal budgets, the Senate Appropriations Committee voted in June to approve a Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations (Labor-HHS) bill that would effectively eliminate the Medicare State Health Insurance Program (SHIP), which provides in-person and over-the-phone Medicare counseling to seniors and people with disabilities. While there is much to like in the Senate’s version of the appropriations bill, such as the expansion of funding to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) that


Alliance Releases The Silver Book®: Diabetic Retinopathy

Date: August 4th, 2016

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a very devastating complication of diabetes that leads to irreversible vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy is a leading cause of vision loss and could impact nearly 191 million people worldwide by 2030.  Vision loss from DR can be avoided with proper management and treatment, and risk is more common in people who have poorly controlled diabetes. Nearly half of all people with diabetes aren’t getting regular eye exams and are diagnosed too late for effective treatment.  The Alliance recently

Related Topics: Silver Book / Diabetes


What You Need to Know about Malnutrition As We Age

Date: August 3rd, 2016

When you visit your health care provider, you can expect the usual barrage of tests and measurements for height, weight, blood pressure, and the like. But have you ever been asked about your food intake or nutritional status? If not, you aren't alone. Malnutrition can be a hidden threat to older adults, with symptoms that include sudden, unintended weight loss and/or loss of appetite and decreased food intake. Many cases of malnutrition go undetected because the signs and symptoms are subtle

Related Topics: Nutrition / Prevention


30 Years of Putting Science in the Spotlight

Date: August 2nd, 2016

For 30 years, the Alliance has been focused on realizing its mission: accelerating the pace of scientific discoveries and their application to vastly improve the universal human experience of aging and health. In this issue of Science in the Spotlight, we take you back over those 30 years to highlight the role we've played in bringing awareness to vital scientific research and discoveries that changed—and continue to change—the way we think about medicine, health, and the future of the human race. The Alliance

Related Topics: Aging Research


Celebrating 30 Years of Advancing Science and Enhancing Lives

Date: August 1st, 2016

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Alliance for Aging Research. Since our creation in 1986, our story has been unfolding as we’ve worked to advance science and enhance lives. Our founder, Dan Perry, describes our story this way:  “It’s a story of how a small group of people set out to square the curve of human aging.  We saw the potential to strengthen human bodies and minds as we age by supporting and energizing scientists who are probing the

Related Topics: Aging Research


New Campaign Focuses on Vaccine Awareness in Older Adults

Date: August 1st, 2016

August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM), an opportunity for us to educate ourselves on the value of vaccinations.  Each year, thousands of Americans are hospitalized or die from vaccine-preventable diseases, and even more are unable to carry out daily tasks while they recover from such illnesses. Even worse, older adults are disproportionately affected by these diseases. Yet, much of this can be prevented when people get their recommended vaccines. During NIAM, the Alliance has launched a campaign to remind older adults and their caregivers why


Q & A with Alliance President and CEO Sue Peschin

Date: July 31st, 2016

In this edition of Living Longer & Loving It, we speak to Sue Peschin, MHS, the Alliance’s president and CEO, about the organization’s 30th anniversary. Sue offered her thoughts on the milestone and her vision for what she would like the Alliance to achieve moving forward. LLLI: What thoughts come to mind when you think about the Alliance’s 30-year anniversary? It’s been a privilege for me to serve as the leader of an organization that has accomplished so much over the last 30 years. I’m


News-At-A-Glance

Date: March 11th, 2016

    Alliance Releases Its Impact Report Our 2015 Impact Report is now available!  You can check it out here.    The President’s Budget: Read the Numbers, Not the Headlines The Obama administration’s FY 2017 vision for the federal government does not include continuing increases for America’s biomedical research community. The Alliance's Ryne Carney shares more.   Seniors Decide Event Spotlights Issues Affecting Older Adults On Wednesday, February 17, the Leadership Council of Aging Organizations hosted the Seniors Decide 2016 forum to discuss the policies and issues that matter most to older adults. The event provided a

Related Topics: Aging Research


Resources to Introduce You to Medication Safety

Date: March 9th, 2016

Every year tens of millions of Americans take over-the-counter (OTC) medication for relief from everyday aches and pain. You are probably one of them. OTC pain medication may be something that you take for granted. It can usually give you effective relief from your pain, without the need to get a prescription. But just because OTC pain medications are generally safe and effective when used as directed, you need to remember that they are not harmless. And they should never be taken casually, because


A Look at the Medicare Advantage Risk Adjustment Model

Date: March 9th, 2016

Medicare Advantage plans, also called “MA Plans” or “Part C,” are private insurance plans regulated by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), covering Part A (hospital insurance) and B (outpatient services) of traditional Medicare. MA Plans differ from traditional Medicare in two important ways. Foremost, MA Plan payments are fixed, while traditional Medicare is fee-for-service (FFS). These fixed payments incentivize physicians to focus on more preventative and early-stage services because it is cheaper to keep patients healthy and provide


What You Should Know about Supplements

Date: March 9th, 2016

As National Nutrition Month gets into full swing, the emphasis on a healthy diet is stronger than ever. And with good reason: A well-balanced diet has proven health benefits like weight loss or maintenance as well as a reduced risk of cancer, cardiovascular events, and other diseases and conditions.   Most people can get the nutrients they need from eating foods such as fruits and vegetables, lean proteins, and whole grains. However, as we age, the amount of nutrients we need, and our body’s ability


Alliance Celebrates 30 Years with 30-Week Campaign

Date: March 8th, 2016

In 1986 the Alliance for Aging Research launched in Washington, D.C.  Our mission? To advance the science of aging and health in order to help people live longer, healthier lives.  In the mid-‘80s, it became apparent to government officials as well as health experts that the aging of the U.S. population would pose an unsustainable demand for health care resources. That was unless strategies for keeping older Americans healthy and vital could be discovered through medical research.  So, Dan Perry, a senior staff member

Related Topics: Aging Research


Alliance Launches New ‘Pocket Film’ Series during National Nutrition Month

Date: March 7th, 2016

The minute we are born, we begin to age. Constant exposure to our environment, the things we eat, and stresses from both inside and outside our bodies all cause us to age over time. While we can’t stop aging, scientists are learning more about how to maintain health throughout our lives. Some aspects of aging are out of our control, but most of us can be healthy and active well into our later years if we take care of ourselves. One of the


Highlights from This Year in Public Policy

Date: December 9th, 2015

This year marked many important policy issues that were of interest to the Alliance. For this edition of Get Mad before You Get Old, we highlight some of the ongoing issues of interest. Reauthorization of the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) program The Prescription Drug User Fee Act, or PDUFA, passed in 1992, authorized the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to begin collecting fees from drug sponsors to give it more resources to review new drugs more quickly. Since then it


News-At-A-Glance

Date: December 8th, 2015

National Geographic Channel Special on Aging On November 29 the National Geographic Channel debuted an important special, "The Age of Aging." Directed by Ron Howard, it highlighted the pioneering research dedicated to extending our healthy years of life, or healthspan.  Also check out this Q & A with Dr. Steven N. Austad, one of the experts who appeared in the special.   Antibiotic Resistance and HAIs The Alliance’s president and CEO Sue Peschin, MHS, published a blog post about the increasing danger of healthcare-associated infections to older adults. She

Related Topics: Aging Research


Learn More about the Flu

Date: December 7th, 2015

Influenza, or the flu, is a contagious respiratory infection caused by the influenza virus. Each year, between 5 percent and 20 percent of the U.S. population gets the flu, with more than 200,000 people hospitalized, and anywhere from 3,000 to 49,000 dying from complications. Typical symptoms of the flu include fever, body aches, chills, fatigue, cough, sore throat, and a runny or stuffy nose. Sometimes it can lead to severe complications such as pneumonia. Young children, older adults, and people with weakened immune


Alliance Annual Dinner Highlights Caregivers, Alzheimer’s Research

Date: December 7th, 2015

The Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner is a time-honored tradition at the Alliance for Aging Research. Over the years, the dinner has brought to the stage of the historic Willard Hotel notable government officials such as Senators John Glenn and Edward Kennedy, extraordinary innovators like Jay Walker and Martha Stewart, and heads of critical health agencies that include the FDA, NIH, CMS, and even NASA. On September 29, 2015, the Alliance continued the tradition of celebrating the cause of aging research and honoring


New Video Demonstrates Why Research Matters

Date: December 6th, 2015

In September the Alliance debuted a new video on the impact of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) at the Rally for Medical Research in Washington, D.C.   It features real people and their family caregivers whose lives were impacted by NIH research. This included people who were diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, heart failure, cancer, stroke, dysautonomia, and hydrocephalus. Some of these diseases may be familiar to you, while others may not. No matter what, conditions like these impact your friends, family, and colleagues every day. Without


Statistics on Chronic Diseases of Aging at Your Fingertips

Date: December 5th, 2015

Earlier this year the Alliance launched a new version of the highly-respected Silver Book® website that offers users convenient access to a comprehensive library of stats, facts, and infographics on diseases and conditions of older age. This includes diseases and conditions such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, atrial fibrillation, osteoporosis, thrombosis, persistent pain, healthcare-associated infections, infectious diseases, and vision loss.  Another condition, diabetic retinopathy, will be added in early 2016. The Alliance’s Vice President of Health Programs Lindsay Clarke notes, “Our primary

Related Topics: Silver Book


News-At-A-Glance

Date: August 6th, 2015

2015 Dinner Honorees Announced The Alliance is proud to honor Representative Diana DeGette (D-CO), Senator Kelly Ayotte (R-NH), and Dr. Rudolph Tanzi of Harvard University at the 22nd Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner for their contributions to help advance the science of human aging.   21st Century Cures Act Passes House, Moves to Senate Last month the U.S. House of Representatives passed the historic 21st Century Cures Act, a landmark piece of legislation that will change how biomedical research is conducted. The bill now moves

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


America’s Ark for the Silver Tsunami: The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)

Date: August 5th, 2015

The United States spends nearly 18 percent of its GDP on health care. With the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population comprised of those 80 and older, and many of these Americans aging with between three and five chronic conditions, finding new ways to get the most out of every health care dollar is essential to our nation’s long-term fiscal health. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) is the federal agency whose sole purpose is to improve the health


More Than Just a Statistic

Date: August 4th, 2015

One in three U.S. women will get cancer in her lifetime. Beverlye Hyman Fead was one of those women. One in 25 people living in the U.S. is a cancer survivor. Beverlye is also a survivor.    In fact you can look at Beverlye’s cancer journey and identify stats that create a scrapbook of sorts that details her path from her diagnosis to today. Of course, Beverlye isn’t just a statistic; she has personal story to tell. But more on that a bit later. Statistics have a profound

Related Topics: Silver Book / Cancer


A Key to Successfully Living with Valve Disease? Learning from Others

Date: August 4th, 2015

Heart valve disease involves damage to one or more of the heart's four valves. Valve defects can be there at birth (congenital) or develop later in life. It is very possible that you or someone you know has had valve disease, as it is common and affects as many as five million Americans each year. While some types are not serious, others can lead to major complications. Fortunately, valve disease can usually be successfully treated with valve repair or replacement in


White Paper Lays Out Case for Increased Vaccination in Older Adults

Date: August 4th, 2015

As we recognize National Immunization Awareness Month in August, the Alliance has released a groundbreaking new paper titled Our Best Shot: Expanding Prevention through Vaccination in Older Adults. Vaccinations are considered an essential component of our health system, protecting us from diseases such as influenza, chickenpox, and measles. Getting their kids vaccinated is a routine part of life for most parents, and increasing vaccination rates in children remains an area of high importance among medical experts and organizations. However, there is another demographic where vaccinations serve an important


Alliance President and CEO Sue Peschin Attends the White House Conference on Aging

Date: August 4th, 2015

On July 13, the White House Conference on Aging welcomed distinguished guests from throughout the United States to Washington, D.C., to both celebrate the contributions older adults make to our society and to discuss issues of importance to seniors.  The conference is held once a decade and has historically served as a platform for the White House to give the nation an update on where we are on the issue of aging, both in terms of how we’ve progressed and where we


News-At-A-Glance

Date: April 2nd, 2015

Alliance Dinner Is September 29 The Alliance’s 22nd Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner will be held on September 29, 2015, in Washington, D.C. We’ll be updating our website throughout the upcoming months, so please check back often for more info.   New Annual Report Now Available We have released our Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2014. It gives a comprehensive overview of everything we’ve done in the past fiscal year to advance the cause of aging research, further research into Alzheimer’s and sarcopenia, and educate on


30 Years in the Making

Date: April 2nd, 2015

In the mid-1980s, leading members of the U.S. Congress became aware that an aging American populace would pose an unsustainable demand on health care resources. This was unless strategies to keep this population healthy could be developed through medical and behavioral research. Members from both sides of the aisle came to the same conclusion: Aging research offered the greatest promise for both moderating health care costs and improving the lives of older Americans. At the time, an organization with the clout needed to


Living with Venous Thromboembolism: What You Need to Know

Date: April 1st, 2015

Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is the third most common cardiovascular illness in the U.S. and includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). VTE occurs in the following manner: A blood clot develops in a deep vein in the body—usually within the muscles of the leg or pelvis. That’s deep vein thrombosis (DVT). When those blood clots break free, they can travel through the circulatory system to the lungs and lodge in a main artery or arteries, blocking blood flow. That is called a pulmonary


Alliance Recognizes Heart Month with AFib Campaign

Date: March 31st, 2015

February is known for groundhogs, presidents, Valentine’s Day, and for those of us here in Washington, D.C., cold and snow. February also has the distinction of being American Heart Month, a time to focus on the importance of heart health. During this month, the Alliance raised awareness about atrial fibrillation with the launch of its Living with AFib campaign. AFib, short for atrial fibrillation, is the most common type of arrhythmia, or irregular heart rhythm, and can lead to stroke and heart-related


Alliance Pain Survey: Focus More on Education about Acetaminophen, Don't Restrict Access

Date: March 31st, 2015

You may take it and not even know it by the technical name: acetaminophen. But if you are one of the 100 million Americans who suffer from persistent pain, you may be aware of its effectiveness as a pain reliever. In fact more than 50 million Americans use one of 600 different prescription and OTC medications containing acetaminophen every week for their pain. It’s America’s most common drug ingredient and safe and effective when used appropriately.  However, taking more acetaminophen than directed by the


Alliance Founder Dan Perry Retires

Date: March 30th, 2015

The founder of the Alliance for Aging Research Dan Perry has announced his retirement with the organization. Perry founded the organization in 1986 and served as its president and CEO until 2014 when Sue Peschin, MHS, assumed the role. During Perry’s tenure, the Alliance became a force in advancing the science of aging and health, advocating for public policies to promote aging research and higher quality of life for older Americans, and creating health education materials on conditions and topics affecting


The Amazing Human Heart

Date: November 25th, 2014

Did you know that the human heart is divided into four chambers? After blood passes through the lungs to pick up oxygen, it flows into the two upper chambers, called atria. When each atrium contracts, or squeezes, blood is pushed through a valve—a thin leaflet of tissue that keeps the blood moving in the correct direction—into the bottom chambers, or ventricles. Blood is then squeezed out of the ventricles through another set of valves and circulated throughout the body. Valves keep


Are Longer Lives a Good Thing?

Date: November 25th, 2014

Alliance founder Dan Perry joined the dean of the Mailman School of Public Health Linda P. Fried at a town hall event on October 22 at Columbia University in New York City to address the topic of "The New Age of Aging: Are Longer Lives a Good Thing?" Moderated by journalist and filmmaker Perri Peltz, Perry and Fried discussed the effects of aging on society, how it is perceived today, and its future. They also took questions from the live audience as well as those who were watching online via Livestream.     The talk


News-At-A-Glance

Date: November 25th, 2014

This Giving Season Consider the Alliance As we enter the holiday season, we also enter that time of the year when giving is at its peak. As you consider your own end of year giving, we wanted to offer a couple of ways you can give back to the Alliance.  The first is through #GivingTuesday. You know about Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but do you know about #GivingTuesday? This is a global day dedicated to giving back to worthy causes. #GivingTuesday offers

Related Topics: Aging Research


Up And Away: Taking and Storing Medications Safely

Date: November 24th, 2014

The average 75-year-old American has three chronic conditions and takes five prescription medications. Even though older adults make up only 13 percent of the U.S. population, they account for 34 percent of all prescription medication use and 30 percent of all over-the-counter (OTC) use. And many of these adults find themselves taking more than one medication at a time.  In fact, two out of five Medicare patients take five or more prescription medications. For most, these medications mean fewer symptoms, less pain, delayed


Turning the Lights on Superbugs

Date: November 24th, 2014

Healthcare-associated infections (HAI) are deadly. Some estimate that these infections kill up to 70,000 people each year. They are also expensive. HAIs cost the U.S. healthcare system as much as $33 billion annually. Earlier this fall, with support from Cubist, the Alliance for Aging Research brought together an amazing group of leaders from the fields of aging, infectious disease, health care and government to discuss the disproportionate impact of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) on older adults and the need for an improved


Alliance Celebrates Healthy Aging at Annual Dinner

Date: November 23rd, 2014

On the evening of September 30, the Alliance for Aging Research held its 21st Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner at the Willard Intercontinental Hotel in Washington, D.C. It was a memorable night that brought together scientists, policymakers, inventors, business leaders, and friends and partners of the Alliance in a combined show of support for aging research.     The dinner served as both a celebration of the Alliance's past year, to reminisce about everything that has gone on and the accomplishments that have been made in field


Q & A with President and CEO Sue Peschin

Date: July 16th, 2014

Sue Peschin was recently named as president and CEO of the Alliance for Aging Research, taking over for Founder Dan Perry. This was a historic moment in the history of our organization. We sat down with Sue to get her thoughts on her position and her vision for the future of the Alliance. LLLI: You are the second president and CEO in the almost 30-year history of the Alliance. What are your initial thoughts on succeeding Dan Perry? Sue: It is an honor for me


Recognizing Aortic Stenosis

Date: July 16th, 2014

Aortic Stenosis in Seniors Explained Older Americans today are more active than previous generations, and the percentage of people age 65 and older who meet exercise recommendations continues to grow. However, for some seniors, activities such as walking up a flight of stairs or playing with grandchildren can result in dizziness, fatigue or even fainting. All of these symptoms could be harmless, but that does not mean they should be ignored. They could be stemming from a condition called aortic stenosis, a


The Graying of the Population: Silver Tsunami or Silver Lining?

Date: July 16th, 2014

A major initiative of the Alliance for Aging Research is to increase the amount of federal funding to support research that extends a person’s healthy years of life. We see this as one of the most effective strategies to reduce the lengthy, painful period of disease and disability many people face as they grow older. When the Alliance goes to Capitol Hill each year to make our case for increasing the budget for dedicated research that may lead to interventions that


A Birthday Party to Celebrate Aging Research

Date: July 16th, 2014

Talaya Waller turned 29 recently. And to celebrate she threw a big party in Washington, D.C., on June 21. While the party was a great success, what was even more meaningful was the main reason she put together the event: She did it in honor of her grandmother and to aid research behind the causes of aging. “For most people, a 29th birthday may not carry much significance as other milestone birthdays," she says. "However, for my 29th birthday, I had the urge to do something


News At-A-Glance

Date: July 16th, 2014

The Alliance's 2014 Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner is fast approaching. This year's event will be held September 30, 2014, at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, D.C. The dinner celebrates advances in aging research and honors individuals for their immense contributions. Among this year's honorees include Jay Walker of TEDMED, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and the Honorable Mitch Daniels, president of Purdue University. We are offering a limited amount of tickets to the dinner, so if you would like


New Film Looks into the Promise of Aging Research

Date: July 16th, 2014

The Alliance's Healthspan Campaign will release a new film this summer called The Healthspan Imperative. Narrated by author and television personality Martha Stewart, this film focuses on a very timely issue: the aging of the U.S. population and the ruinous effect it could have on our economy and way of life. But the film isn't just about a hopeless future, it's about the hope offered through the promise of aging research.  Featuring exclusive interviews with leading lights in the field of gerontology, The Healthspan Imperative


Sepsis: Common & Deadly

Date: October 10th, 2013

Every year as many as one million Americans develop sepsis—a life-threatening medical condition that arises when the body initiates a powerful immune response against an infection. All types of infection can lead to sepsis—from an infected scrape, to pneumonia, to an infection at a surgical incision site, and no matter what the origin, sepsis can lead to death. Sepsis is the 10th leading cause of death in the U.S. and up to 40% of patients do not survive. Anyone can get


Geroscience: The Science of Aging

Date: October 10th, 2013

While the study of the science behind aging is not new, it has only recently become organized and recognized enough to warrant its own name—geroscience. Geroscience is a field that aims to understand the relationship between aging and age-related disease. Geroscientists and their supporters believe that this relationship is the key to finding new ways to prevent, slow, and cure the diseases that disproportionately impact us as we grow older. Scientists now generally agree that aging—and the disease and dysfunction


More Data for Sound Decision-Making: Improving Government Scoring for Prevention

Date: October 10th, 2013

More than 133 million Americans live with a chronic condition like diabetes or heart disease. As the population ages, that number is expected to climb to 171 million by 2030. Advanced age is the single greatest risk factor for many chronic conditions. However, the illness, suffering, and premature death caused by chronic diseases are often accelerated by risk factors that can be prevented like a lack of physical activity, poor nutrition, and tobacco use. As the chronic disease epidemic in the

Related Topics: Prevention


Infection: On the Rise in America's Seniors

Date: October 10th, 2013

Since the discovery of antibiotics, the leading causes of death in the United States have shifted from infectious diseases to chronic, non-contagious diseases. Unfortunately, because of low rates of adult vaccination and the increase of resistance to antibiotics, infectious diseases and fatal infections are on the rise in America’s older population. Despite their tremendous potential for prevention, vaccination rates in seniors fall far short of targets set by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control. In 2010: Only 62.3% of adults age 65


Get Old: Claim Your Age

Date: July 1st, 2013

If you’ve never fudged your age, you know someone who has. Someone who keeps turning 49, year after year, instead of embracing 50 or some other aging milestone. And if you dread your birthday and wish for a lower number on your driver’s license, you’re not alone. True, with aging usually comes more wrinkles, more aches and pains, more pills, and even more disease and disability. But it also comes with more experiences, more joy, and more wisdom. Pfizer, Inc., one

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


2MILLION2MANY Campaign: Reducing the Burden of Osteoporosis

Date: July 1st, 2013

Most people who break a bone are treated in the emergency room or at an urgent care facility, and life goes on. But 2 million of those bone breaks each year are not the result of an accident, but a sign of osteoporosis. Despite these numbers, only 2 in 10 older women who break a bone are treated for or even receive a simple test for osteoporosis. Believe it or not, osteoporosis—the deterioration of bone tissues and bone mass—is one of

Related Topics: Osteoporosis


New Silver Book Website: Now Easier to Access the Latest Facts on Chronic Disease

Date: July 1st, 2013

The Alliance for Aging Research is excited to announce the launch of the newly re-designed www.silverbook.org, which brings 1,000s of facts and statistics from more than 600 sources, into one easy-to-use website. The new site continues to offer free access to the same unique database that features the latest information on the burden of chronic disease and the value of innovation in reducing that burden; but now with advanced search features, better navigability, and a more modern design. Medical Research: The


Buying a House and Federal Funding Agencies: What a Homebuyer's Budget Has in Common with a 302(b) Allocation

Date: July 1st, 2013

When purchasing a home, many couples experience a rollercoaster ride of emotions stemming from the numerous decisions they must make together—decisions that affect each other and their future. From choosing a preferred house style, to coming up with a list of “must have” features, the negotiations can seem endless, and a compromise can be daunting. The most contentious debate among fiscally conscious homebuyers is usually not about the decision to purchase a Tudor or a Colonial; it typically involves establishing an


The Month of Love and Heart Health

Date: February 1st, 2013

It’s that time of year where people throughout the world exchange candy, flowers, and sentimental gifts with their loved ones, and those that they hope to love.  While many of us believe—especially those who grumble at the thought of the lovey-dovey holiday—that Valentine’s Day was invented by greeting card and chocolate companies to up their profits, it actually has a long, and somewhat dark history. Heart health advocacy organizations are hoping to add to the history of Valentine’s Day by designating


Muscle Loss and Aging: Combatting Sarcopenia and Lost Independence

Date: February 1st, 2013

Typically, our muscles grow larger and stronger as we age. That is, until about the time we celebrate our 30th birthdays. That’s when most of us start down the other side of the hill and begin to gradually lose our muscle mass, strength, and function. While it’s usually not very noticeable in our 30s and 40s, the loss increases exponentially with age and tends to accelerate between the ages of 65 and 80. This progressive loss of muscle mass is called


Taxes or Medical Research? Tensions Rise in the Battle to Reduce the Deficit

Date: February 1st, 2013

The country did not go over the "fiscal cliff" thanks to the American Taxpayer Relief Act of 2012 (ATRA), which was passed by Congress on New Year’s Day.  While fears loomed that lawmakers would fail to act in time, ATRA addressed the expiration of numerous tax credits, raised some revenue, and temporarily delayed automatic spending cuts scheduled to take effect on December 31, 2012. When ATRA became law America earned a temporary reprieve from imminent economic catastrophe.  However, our health


Helping Stop a Devastating Disease: The ACT-AD Coalition Continues its Important Work in Alzheimer's Disease

Date: February 1st, 2013

Alzheimer's disease is a slow, dehumanizing, and fatal disease that strikes 1 in 8 people over the age of 65. While it's typically thought of as a disease that affects memory, it goes well beyond memory loss and eventually leads to death. The disease progresses gradually as abnormal proteins—called plaques and tangles—accumulate in the brain and kill healthy cells. It starts out in the part of the brain where memories are formed, which is often the time when an individual seeks


Alzheimer's Treatment and Care at a Crossroads: Pursuing All Avenues to Provide Relief

Date: October 1st, 2012

If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, you’ve most likely wondered if there are any ways to relieve some of the burden of the disease, in addition to the pills to manage its symptoms. For many diseases like heart disease and diabetes, changes to diet and exercise are as high on health care providers list of advice for patients as a prescription for medication, but this isn’t the case with how they approach Alzheimer’s disease. You


Harnessing Technology & Science: Researchers Collaborate to Build an Unprecedented Resource

Date: October 1st, 2012

Recognizing both the power of technology and the priceless health information contained in the human genome, Kaiser Permanente and the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), have formed a groundbreaking collaboration in order to produce one of the largest biobanks in the world. A biobank is a repository—or storage space—for biological samples to be used in research. They give researchers access to data (like genetics and disease information) and samples (like blood and saliva) from large numbers of people. Those data

Related Topics: Aging Research


Know Your Pulse: It Could Save Your Life

Date: October 1st, 2012

Think back and try to remember if your doctor or another health care professional checked your pulse during your last visit? Not with a stethoscope but with their fingers on your wrist? If you’re like many people you’re sure that they listened to your heart and checked your blood pressure, but you’re also pretty sure no one has taken your pulse in a while. While listening to your heart with a stethoscope helps your doctor evaluate the functioning of your heart


Do We Have to Age the Way We Age? Dan Perry Takes This Question to the TEDMED Stage

Date: October 1st, 2012

TEDMED is most known for its annual conference--a medical spin-off from the TED conference where people come to share big ideas and foster new ones. But TEDMED is also a community of people who are all passionate about the future of health and medicine, but in amazingly different ways. At the TEDMED conference, leaders from countless backgrounds come together to share and explore. According to the TEDMED organizers, it’s the “only place where a Nobel Prize winning neurobiologist has a conversation


The Common Denominator: The Key to Extending Healthspan

Date: May 1st, 2012

Most people know what lifespan is—the average length of life of a species, often measured within a sub-population like “Americans” or “women.” Essentially—how long we live. But few have even heard of healthspan. Dictionary.com defines it as the “period of one’s life during which one is generally healthy and free from serious disease.” Essentially—how long we live in good health. But a search of many of the other leading on-line dictionaries for healthspan, including Merriam-Webster and The Free Dictionary, returned “word


Under Treatment of a Treatable Disease: T.A.K.E. on Glaucoma

Date: May 1st, 2012

An estimated 2.3 million Americans are living with glaucoma and because it is a disease of aging, that number is expected to climb during this decade—surpassing 3.3 million by 2020—a 50% increase. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that are associated with elevated eye pressure that can damage the optic nerve and cause vision loss. That vision loss can usually be prevented with early detection and proper treatment and disease management, yet glaucoma continues to be one of the


An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure: Are We Sacrificing Health for a Balanced Budget?

Date: May 1st, 2012

Last summer, lawmakers were not just feeling the heat of the August sun in Washington when Congress passed the Budget Control Act of 2011(BCA). Under pressure to raise the country’s debt ceiling, the BCA allowed the president to do so by up to $2.8 trillion, but only by requiring the deficit to be slashed by $2.3 trillion over the next decade. Not a bad trade, right? Think again. The methods used to make these cuts could take a fat slice


Go4Life: NIA Campaign Encourages Exercise at All Ages

Date: May 1st, 2012

Exercise is good for your health. Not surprising right? We’ve all watched countless news reports and read stacks of stories extolling the virtues of regular exercise. So why do only 30% of adults between the ages of 45 and 64 report that they engage in regular physical activity? That number gets even lower as we age with only 25% of people between the ages of 65 and 74, and 11% of those ages 85 and older, saying that they exercise


Silver Scholars: Valuing Active Aging

Date: July 1st, 2011

We make decisions using economics every day. Deciding whether or not to spend money on something we usually find ourselves weighing the benefits against the costs. Should I buy an iPhone so I can check my e-mail on the train, or get the free phone and check when I get home? Should I buy the more expensive house that’s closer to work, or the one in a more affordable neighborhood with a longer commute? Should I hire someone to paint


Conscious Aging Through Art: Couple Finds Beauty and Peace in Aging

Date: July 1st, 2011

Who hasn’t looked in the mirror only to find someone staring back with too many wrinkles and gray hairs? Someone who we don’t recognize because that person is way too old? When Alice and Richard Matzkin found themselves and their loved ones confronting bodies being etched by time and pulled down by gravity, they became overwhelmed by fear. “Fear of the future was making me neglect the most precious moment of my life: now,” says Alice. “I wasn’t looking for the

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Can We Work the Bugs Out? In Search of the Next-Generation IPAB

Date: July 1st, 2011

An IPAB is not the latest device created by Apple to play music or store your online files. IPAB is the Independent Payment Advisory Board and its purpose is to oversee costs in Medicare. The only similarity between IPAB and an iPAD is that both are small and complex units with tremendous power to change lives. But for those receiving their health care under the Medicare program, IPAB’s changes may not be for the better. The IPAB was part of the


The Balancing Act: Managing Atrial Fibrillation

Date: July 1st, 2011

Every year around 75,000 Americans learn that they have atrial fibrillation. Some are diagnosed after noticing that their heart is racing or skipping beats. Others feel chest and throat pressure that they think is a heart attack. Or they go to their doctors feeling tired-out and weak all the time. Some feel nothing at all. Atrial fibrillation is the most common type of arrhythmia—or abnormal heart rhythm. Also referred to as afib, it’s a disorder involving the heart’s electrical system. During


Super Agers: Sharing Their Secrets

Date: May 1st, 2011

A new website from Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University—SuperAgers.com—highlights the findings from more than a decade of aging research and features some of the centenarians that shared their secrets, and their DNA, for this seminal project. SuperAgers.com helps us understand the current state of aging science, the genetics of aging, and the tremendous potential for useful aging interventions. It also lets us hear the personal stories of individuals who are living longer and loving it. Their Inspiring Stories More than


Bracing for the Silver Tsunami: Aging Research May Save Lives and Money

Date: May 1st, 2011

Investigators supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) are on the cusp of research breakthroughs that could enhance their abilities to predict and intervene earlier in the processes of many age-related chronic diseases. In particular, rapid progress in recent years in advancing understanding of the aging process has led to considerable knowledge of how scientists might increase human health in later life by opposing the primary risk factor for most disease of aging—aging itself. If realized, these advances would usher


Treatments for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Going Head to Head

Date: May 1st, 2011

Exciting treatments make slowing and even restoring vision loss in wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) patients a reality. Two of the most frequently used treatments are currently in the spotlight as they go head-to-head in clinical trials comparing their effectiveness, and to some extent, exploring their costs. The Anti-VEGF Treatments AMD is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in Americans age 60 and over. This progressive eye disease involves the breakdown of the macula—the light-sensing portion of the retina—resulting in the


Treating Valve Disease: Successful Options for All Patients

Date: May 1st, 2011

Each year, as many as 5 million Americans are diagnosed with valve disease. There are a number of different types of valve disease and all of them involve defects or damage to one or more of the heart’s four valves. While some types are not serious, others can lead to major complications, including death. Fortunately, most valve disease can be successfully treated with surgery in patients of all ages and races. The Valve Disease Gap Cardiovascular diseases—which include heart diseases and stroke—are


Managing Diabetes: Innovative New Breakthroughs on the Horizon

Date: July 1st, 2010

Diabetes in the U.S. is continuing to rise at an alarming rate, fueled in large part by the obesity epidemic and our increasingly sedentary lifestyles and poor diets. Every year, more than 1.6 million Americans develop diabetes—joining the ranks of the more than 28 million Americans who already have the disease. iving with diabetes means constantly facing an increased risk of many serious complications, which are often hard to reverse once they develop. Diabetics often have to deal with heart disease,

Related Topics: Silver Book / Diabetes


Searching for Answers & Hope: Learning About a Disease that Steals Memories

Date: July 1st, 2010

First they told her she had Alzheimer’s disease. Next they suggested that the medications they had prescribed to control her anxiety and depression were the cause. Then they told her it was Parkinson’s. It was years before doctors finally figured out what was making Susan Grant’s mind slip away. “For a long time I told my M.D. that something was different in my brain. Something was not working right,” recounts Susan. Six diagnoses, countless hours of tests, and a lot of


The Changing Face of HIV/AIDS: A Graying Epidemic

Date: July 1st, 2010

When the AIDS epidemic first shook the nation in the 1980s, no one with the virus was expected to live long—let alone reach old age. But thanks to the discovery of effective drug therapies, most people with the disease can now look forward to living well into their senior years. Add to that the fact that older Americans are becoming newly infected at an alarming rate, and HIV/AIDS is clearly no longer a problem for the young. Today, 35% of people


What is the 510(k)? Balancing Benefits, Safety, and Patient Needs

Date: July 1st, 2010

What does a tongue depressor have in common with an artificial knee and a heart monitor? This is not trick question or an unsolvable riddle—all three are medical devices that must go through the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for approval. Many of us are exposed to medical devices on a regular basis but few of us give much thought to who develops these products, and even fewer take the time to consider how their benefits and safety were


Aortic Stenosis: Under-Diagnosed and Under-Treated

Date: May 1st, 2010

Aortic stenosis is a type of heart disease where the aortic valve becomes narrowed over time, obstructing blood flow to the body. It is more common with age and if left untreated, can lead to heart disease, significantly decreased quality of life, heart failure, and even death. Fortunately, aortic stenosis (AS) can usually be treated with surgery in patients of all ages. Despite the fact that surgery is associated with better survival and considerable improvements in quality of life, AS is


CAN You Help Find a Cure? Funding May Mean the Difference Between Life and Death

Date: May 1st, 2010

After a long fought battle over how best to structure meaningful health reform legislation, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law in March. Many media sources are reporting on the negative financial impact some health reform provisions might have on the country, but little attention has been focused on positive aspects of the bill that could make a real difference in the lives of many people suffering from, or who will face, serious and life-threatening


Our Sick Environment: Threatening Healthy Aging

Date: May 1st, 2010

Headlines continue to be filled with news about how we are “pre-programmed” for disease, but our genes are not the only things putting us at risk. When it comes to age-related chronic diseases, major risk factors like genetics, age, gender, and environmental factors appear to interact to cause disease. Our environment not only includes the natural world, but by many definitions also includes the physical, social, and cultural contexts in which we live. The air we breathe, water we drink, food

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Pain and Confusion: Figuring Out How to Safely Treat Pain

Date: May 1st, 2010

Are you or a loved one dealing with persistent pain but confused about what medications are safe? Understandably so! Treating persistent pain can be challenging and now warnings about the risks of leading pain relievers have left many of us wondering what we can do to safely treat our pain. News in recent years warned about the risks of two well-known pain relievers—acetaminophen and NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Despite risks including liver damage, and gastrointestinal and cardiovascular conditions, these medications can


Battling Health Disparities: Closing the Gaps

Date: July 1st, 2009

Thanks to enormous advances in public health and exciting breakthroughs in medical innovation, over the past century Americans have seen dramatic gains in health and longevity. The United States currently spends more on health care than any other nation and for most people, this means access to one of the best health care systems in the world. Unfortunately, it doesn’t benefit all people equally and the reality is that most minorities have less access to care, fewer options for prevention


Navigating Health Care Transitions: Tools for Information Sharing

Date: July 1st, 2009

At some point in our lives, most of us will face an illness where we have to deal with many different health care professionals—often spread out in different locations and settings across the health care system. Our primary physician may refer us to a specialist, or we may have an emergency that sends us to the ER and later requires that we be admitted to the hospital or see our primary physician for follow-up. We may even have to move


Restoring a Committment to Medical Research

Date: July 1st, 2009

Investigators supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) are on the cusp of research breakthroughs that may enhance their ability to predict and intervene earlier in the processes of many age-related chronic diseases. These discoveries will not only positively impact the health of countless people, but they also have the potential to reduce the long-term health costs that are expected to grow as a result of our aging society. Unfortunately, the current state of federal support for the NIH could


Alice Thomas: Walking a Non-Traditional Path

Date: July 1st, 2009

At 79 years old, Alice Thomas is definitely not your traditional law student, but all her life she’s walked a fairly non-traditional path. Leaving home at just 16 years old, Thomas worked a variety of jobs to support herself including a drug-store waitress, a typist, and even an elevator operator. She eventually found herself in the construction industry despite the fact that it was and continues to be a “man’s world.” Thomas started off as a receptionist but climbed the ranks

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


What is Aging Research? Defining the Field

Date: July 1st, 2009

How exactly does one define aging research? It turns out that finding agreement on a single definition is not as easy as it seems. If you do an Internet search for the terms “aging research” you’ll get a feel for just how confusing it can get. Your search should turn up close to 9.5 million results—including organizations, articles, speeches, blog posts, and experts. You will find that many of these sources have a different idea of what exactly aging research is—although

Related Topics: Aging Research


Fashion Savvy Seniors Help Redefine Old Age

Date: June 1st, 2009

Today’s seniors are blowing old-age stereotypes out of the water and redefining what exactly it means to be “old.” This is a generation that can expect to live longer than past generations, tends to be better educated and more financially secure, and has a long history of independence. We’re already seeing changes in the lifestyles and typical images of seniors, and with the baby boom generation approaching their senior years, we’re sure to see even more. Outside the Box Many of these

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


The Savings and the Safety of Drug Importation

Date: June 1st, 2009

The president and Congress are embarking on a fervent campaign to reform our damaged health care system. Few would disagree that there is waste in our current system, and even fewer would disagree with the fact that we need to bring healthcare to the 46 million Americans who are currently uninsured. But, many in Washington and across the country disagree on how to go about financing the massive health care overhaul that lawmakers are now proposing. Finding Ways to Save Senators Byron


Cordelia Taylor: Making Change Happen

Date: June 1st, 2009

Working as a registered nurse and nursing home administrator for close to two decades, Cordelia Taylor got a hard look at a system where patient needs were too often put second to the desire for profits. After her ideas for change were rejected by her boss, Mrs. Taylor left her job to start her own facility where residents would be treated with love and respect. Returning to one of the toughest neighborhoods in Milwaukee—the same neighborhood where she and her husband

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Long Living in the Blue Zones

Date: June 1st, 2009

You’ve probably heard that Americans are living longer than ever—in fact the average baby born today can expect to live to be 78 years old. But did you know there are close to 50 other countries with even longer life expectancies? Scientists all over the world have spent countless hours studying the life expectancy differences between countries, cultures, and races. They have searched for answers in their genes, their diets, their exercise routines, their healthcare access, and even their tendencies to


Raising Awareness: The First Step in Preventing Senior Suicide

Date: May 1st, 2009

Every age group is at risk for suicide, but the most vulnerable group may surprise you. Older adults—particularly white men—experience the highest rate of suicide in the U.S. In 2005, the elderly comprised 12 percent of the population yet accounted for 17 percent of all suicides—more than 7,000 older Americans committed suicide that year. Despite these frightening statistics, seniors remain underserved by prevention and treatment programs and resources. Fortunately a number of groups and organizations are working to bring attention to

Related Topics: Mental Illness


Investing in the Longevity Dividend

Date: October 1st, 2008

Life expectancy has reached an all-time high, and with that comes an increased risk of chronic diseases and other health conditions. Chronic diseases account for nearly three-fourths of the more than $2 trillion the U.S. annually spends on health care. If those numbers sound daunting, consider that costs will skyrocket in January 2011 when 78 million Americans begin to enroll in Medicare. The new president may choose to revamp health care when he takes office, but without breakthroughs in research,

Related Topics: Aging Research


Pharmaceutical Companies Offer Free Medications to Those in Need

Date: October 1st, 2008

For the 47 million Americans without health insurance, each day is a struggle to find a way to pay for prescription drugs. Older adults, who are often prescribed several medications at a time, can find it even more difficult to pay medical bills. Despite the start of Medicare Part D in 2006, the elderly still spend thousands of dollars a year on prescription drug costs. What many people don’t know is that they may be eligible to receive their medications


Election 2008: Candidates Paying Too Little Attention to the Approaching Silver Tsunami

Date: October 1st, 2008

The 2008 presidential election is upon us and health care reform is at the top of both candidates’ agendas. Democratic Nominee Senator Barack Obama and Republican Nominee Senator John McCain have both offered detailed plans to fix our ailing health care system. While their plans have very little in common, they both offer solutions to lower skyrocketing health care costs and make health insurance more affordable for more people. Unfortunately, both plans pay too little attention to the approaching silver tsunami. The


Jack Scnhepp: Forever Young at Heart

Date: October 1st, 2008

Jack Schnepp doesn’t know what he’d do if he didn’t sing. “It’s just a natural thing now,” he says. The 78-year-old inherited a love for music from his parents—his mother was once involved in vaudeville and his ukulele-playing father performed in amateur productions. Jack began singing lessons when he was a young teenager, following his sister’s lead. He performed in musicals in high school and at the University of Pennsylvania, but his singing career truly began in 1999 when he

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Sirtuins, Famine, and the Fountain of Youth

Date: October 1st, 2008

There’s been a lot of buzz lately about a “red wine” drug that could be a fountain of youth—combating the effects of aging and age-related disease. The drug, along with other promising breakthroughs, is being developed by Sirtris Pharmaceuticals—a company recently purchased by drug giant GlaxoSmithKline. The drug is based on resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine that activates important sirtuin genes and has extended healthy life in animal studies. The Sirtuin Family Sirtuins are genes found in most organisms—from bacteria


Caring for An Aging America: Moving from Study to Action

Date: July 1st, 2008

In April the prestigious Institute of Medicine (IOM) released its latest report and recommendations about what needs to be done to build the health care workforce to care for an aging population. The report, Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Health Care Workforce, provides a snapshot of the health care challenges posed by elderly patients living with multiple chronic conditions, and highlights the increasingly complex health needs of this rapidly aging population and the inability of the nation’s current


Helping Alzheimer's Caregivers Take Care of Their Own Health

Date: July 1st, 2008

The role of caregiver for a loved one diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease can be a stressful one. Caring for someone with a memory-related disease is more stressful than helping someone with a physical injury. Due to the demands of caring for someone with Alzheimer’s, caregivers tend to neglect their own health care and well-being. One study shows that up to 47 percent of family caregivers experience depression, but with the right resources, caregivers can successfully balance their time and provide


Investing for Falls Prevention

Date: July 1st, 2008

Falls are a menace to older adults and our overstrained health care system. The direct medical costs of falls among older adults now total more than $19 billion, most of which must be absorbed by Medicare and Medicaid. A new bill recently passed by Congress seeks to address the problem of falls, but will have little impact without adequate funding. Life Changes in an Instant For those who live with an older adult, there is no more heart-stopping sound than the crash


Michael Debakey: Renaissance Man of Medicine

Date: July 1st, 2008

In April 2008, the renowned surgeon Michael E. DeBakey, M.D., joined a very exclusive society. Under the imposing dome of the Capitol Rotunda, President Bush presented DeBakey with the nation’s highest civilian honor—the Congressional Gold Medal—whose past recipients include George Washington, Thomas Edison, Winston Churchill, and Jonas Salk. DeBakey, who will be 100 years old on September 7, 2008, was characteristically articulate and forward-thinking in his acceptance remarks, urging his audience to pursue health care reform. DeBakey’s presence at the ceremony

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Tools to Help Women Take Charge of Their Bone Health

Date: May 1st, 2008

Osteoporosis, also known as porous bone disease, is a silent disease; often the first symptom is a broken bone. It poses a serious risk to older, post-menopausal women, although men can develop the disease also. Ten million Americans have osteoporosis, and 34 million suffer from osteopenia or low bone mass, which increases the risk of developing osteoporosis. The aging of the baby boomer generation will boost these numbers to 52 million by 2010. Women have an opportunity to hear from other


Neurogenesis Plays Key Role in Learning and Memory: Salk Scientists Find

Date: May 1st, 2008

Not long ago, the suggestion that old brains could grow new nerve cells – or neurons – was unthinkable among neurologists. Today, however, we know that neural stem cells are indeed capable of growing new neurons throughout life. This process is called neurogenesis, which literally means “the birth of new neurons.” Precisely how nerve stem cells function and how they are regulated, however, have remained something of a mystery until recently. At the Salk Institute for Biological Studies in La Jolla, Calif., Fred H.

Related Topics: Brain Health


Seniors' Oral Health Care: Nothing to Smile About

Date: May 1st, 2008

Oral Health Care Important to Well-Being Oral health is important to the overall well-being of older Americans. Preventive dental care can head off more expensive dental work and help prevent severe diseases. Unfortunately, dental costs are primarily out-of-pocket for those over 65, and when financially strapped, they may forego regular visits to the dentist. This decision to “do without” can have serious consequences, because the elderly suffer a disproportionate and debilitating amount of oral disease. The facts: Nearly one-third of older adults

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Stopping Alzheimer's: What Can You Do?

Date: May 1st, 2008

With the aging of the population, experts warn that Alzheimer’s disease will reach epidemic proportions by mid-century, creating massive and unsustainable burdens in terms of health care costs, overwhelmed families, and millions of lives tragically lost to a devastating disease. According to the Alzheimer’s Association’s latest report, 5.2 million Americans already have Alzheimer’s and as they age, one in eight baby boomers will develop this devastating and fatal disease. And despite the fact that the disease was discovered more than 100 years ago,


The Prophet of Fitness: Jack LaLanne at 93

Date: May 1st, 2008

Say “Jack LaLanne” and most Americans over 30 will remember a dark-haired fellow, in a blue jumpsuit and impressively-muscled arms, on TV. He was performing leg lifts, or one-arm push-ups on his fingertips, and urging you to do the same. Broadcast from 1951 to 1985, The Jack LaLanne Show was the first exercise program on television. hanks to video sites like YouTube, clips of Jack’s original shows are now available on the Internet. And so are clips of him on TV talk


Empowering Patients with Information and Improving Care

Date: March 1st, 2008

No one can deny that our country’s health care spending is reaching an unmanageable level. In 2006 we spent over $2 trillion on health care and some experts predict that we’ll be spending twice that much by 2017. While you might assume that population growth is causing these increases—more people usually means more health care—we’re also seeing a rise in the amount of money that we spend on each person. One of the major reasons that health care costs are skyrocketing


The Changing Face of Facebook

Date: February 1st, 2008

You’ve probably heard about Facebook—the website that all the teenagers are talking about, right? Well not anymore! Facebook is an on-line social networking site that is rapidly changing and reaching out to audiences of all ages and types. Facebook started off as a resource for students to stay connected with one another but has quickly expanded to include people of all ages—more than 120 million people are currently signed-up. Users can create a profile page and include information about themselves, their

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Study Shows Benefit of Flowers for Older Adults

Date: February 1st, 2008

“Flowers make people better, happier, and more helpful; they are sunshine, food, and medicine to the soul.” American botanist Luther Burbank may have been onto something when he proclaimed this in the early 20th century. Many decades later, studies have found that flowers may actually have health benefits—especially for older adults. A 2001 Rutgers University study found that flowers eased depression, improved social interaction, and enhanced memory in adults age 55 and older. The study was partially funded by the


Helen Raffel and Marianne Prichard: Lifetimes of Learning

Date: February 1st, 2008

Helen Raffel, 80, and Marianne Prichard, 62, are a part of a growing number of Americans who are dedicating their retirement years to the Peace Corps—an organization that sends volunteers around the world to assist with issues ranging from AIDS education to environmental protection. With only 6% of its volunteers age 50 and older, the Peace Corps recently launched a campaign to recruit older Americans. 1 Although Raffel didn’t join the Peace Corps until she was 70, her love of travel

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Finding the Science Behind Alternative Medicine

Date: February 1st, 2008

More and more Americans are turning to complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) to treat a variety of their ailments and help them fight diseases. In fact, a national survey found that more than one-third of adults use some form of CAM. Despite this widespread use, many of these therapies are not supported by science and little is known about how or if they work. What is Complementary & Alternative Medicine So what exactly is complementary and alternative medicine? According to the National

Related Topics: Prevention


The Eyes Have It

Date: October 1st, 2007

Every day, our eyes enable us to respond to the smiles on our children’s faces, perform our daily tasks at work, watch our paths for obstacles, and even drive wherever we need to go. Unfortunately, for many of us aging can make these everyday moments more difficult. Diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and cataracts can gradually rob us of a precious way that we interact with the world. As seeing becomes more of a strain, we


Progress in Fighting Eye Disease

Date: October 1st, 2007

The human eye is a complex marvel of biology. Specialized cells take in light, parse it into electrical signals, and transmit them to the part of the brain that reassembles the information into images, motion, color, and depth. With so many dedicated cells working together in such an intricate system, it is easy to see why the eye is susceptible to disease. Scientists hope that by understanding how that system works and what causes it to fail, we will be able

Related Topics: Vision Loss


The High Cost of Eye Disease

Date: October 1st, 2007

As our population ages, the impact of eye disease on our economy will continue to grow, yet new research and treatments hold great promise to blunt the cost and improve patients’ lives. Eye disease has a disproportionate impact on older Americans. Aging makes us more susceptible to certain eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataracts. Close to 10 million Americans have some form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and every year, an additional 200,000 develop the disease.

Related Topics: Vision Loss


Building "Elder Friendly" Communities

Date: October 1st, 2007

It is no secret that America’s population is aging at a rapid rate. As the Baby Boomers grow older, the United States will be faced with a daunting demographic shift: by 2030, it is estimated that persons over the age of 65 will represent 20% of the population of the United States, some 71.5 million Americans. Despite these figures, America as a whole remains unprepared to accommodate its aging population. As the number of older Americans continues to increase, many communities

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Sally Gordon: Work Ethic Drives Her to Take on New Roles

Date: October 1st, 2007

For 24 years Sally Gordon has served as Nebraska’s first woman Sergeant at Arms. At age 98, she has no plans on stopping. “As long as I’m in good health, and I can continue to do this, I will,” she said. Often called “red coats,” the sergeants at arms provide security for the state legislature. Duties include greeting the public, attending hearings, bringing notes from lobbyists to senators, and chasing after missing-in-action senators when a vote is called. “Politicians shape our lives. They

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Keeping Up the Fight Against Heart Disease

Date: July 1st, 2007

Cardiovascular disease is a classic “good news, bad news” story. Although improved treatments have led to lower death rates, an aging and overweight population poses challenges for the U.S. health care system, experts said at a recent briefing in Washington, D.C. “The real transformative way for us to address cardiovascular disease will be from science and discoveries that translate into optimal medical care,” said Daniel Perry, executive director of the nonprofit Alliance for Aging Research, which co-sponsored the Capitol Hill briefing


The Secrets of Eating for Your Age

Date: July 1st, 2007

Mom’s advice to eat your vegetables and get a well-rounded diet doesn’t get any less relevant as you get older. As you age, eating right continues to play a vital role in whether or not you will enjoy a healthy and active lifestyle. However, eating right for your age may mean making some adjustments in your eating habits. The Alliance for Aging Research recently launched a campaign to educate older adults about the importance of maintaining good nutrition with age. The

Related Topics: Nutrition


Caring for Caregivers

Date: July 1st, 2007

Chronic illness takes its toll in many ways, including decreased quality of life and increased mortality. But while the suffering of patients is well known, the effect such illness has on caregivers can be just as crippling, and even deadly. According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, more than 44 million people are involved in caring for a friend or relative. The majority of family caregivers are women, typically a 46-year-old woman who is married and employed, who cares for her


Manage Your Over-the-Counter Medications

Date: July 1st, 2007

Over-the-counter medications can be an effective and relatively inexpensive way to reduce pain, get a good night’s sleep, and be more productive. But because they’re available easily without a prescription, many people may mistakenly believe that taking them contains no risk. It’s true that over-the-counter medications are generally safe when taken as directed. But it’s important for everyone – especially older people, who may be taking multiple medications - both over-the-counter and prescription - to understand how to manage all of

Related Topics: Drug Safety


A Labor of Love: Ruth Lubic

Date: July 1st, 2007

Innovative, determined and passionate are words that best describe Ruth Lubic, who at age 80, continues to be an outspoken advocate for women and families, particularly the poor. A nurse-midwife for 45 years, she is recognized as a national leader in promoting an intimate, "low tech, high touch" approach to childbirth. Lubic’s altruism and her belief in the importance of a positive birthing process were shaped by her own experiences. Growing up in a small town in Pennsylvania during the Depression,

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


A Different Kind of "Food Pyramid" for Better Health

Date: May 1st, 2007

The Dream of the Perfect Food A food that grants youth and immortality is an ancient dream celebrated in myth. The Greek gods ate ambrosia, which conferred grace or immortality. To stay young forever, the Norse gods ate the golden apples of Idun. Now in the 21st century, science tells us that a healthy diet is important to insuring a long and healthy life. But just what makes for a healthy diet? We are inundated by conflicting nutritional advice. Pyramid Power In an effort

Related Topics: Nutrition


Folic Acid: Boost for Your Brain?

Date: May 1st, 2007

Want to boost your memory and brain power? Eat more strawberries and asparagus. Both are good sources of folic acid, a vitamin that improved memory and cognition in healthy adults 50-70 years old, according to a study reported in the medical journal Lancet (Jan. 20, 2006). Folic acid, called "folate" in its natural form in food, gets its name from the Latin word "folium" for leaf. It's a water-soluble B vitamin best known in the U.S. for preventing birth defects. Researchers in


Make Health IT a National Priority

Date: May 1st, 2007

Clinical trials - the current gold standard for testing the effectiveness and safety of various drugs and medical treatments - are often performed on young, low-risk subjects, making their relevance questionable for a growing population of older patients living with multiple chronic conditions. At the same time, however, a wealth of real-world research on the benefits different treatments provide to these older patients is being performed in physicians' offices every day. Giving other doctors easy access to this information for use


High Quality Health Care from Home

Date: May 1st, 2007

Living with chronic illness is time-consuming and costly. Frequent (or unnecessary) trips to the doctor's office or emergency room take a toll, not just physically, but emotionally and socially as well. With an aging population and chronic diseases on the rise, the ability of the health care system to effectively cope is threatened. But a promising new technology can ease the burden on both health care facilities and patients and improve the quality of life for elderly Americans living with


Clifford Ashley: World Traveler Continues His Adventures in the Classroom

Date: May 1st, 2007

At age 85, Clifford Ashley continues to lead an active lifestyle, which he attributes in large part to his work with kids. Working as a substitute teacher for the past eight years in Lake Placid, N.Y., Ashley teaches children from kindergarten through 12th grade. Whether substituting as a first grade teacher in computer class, or calculus for seniors, to any other subject imaginable, Ashley has no problem keeping up. After 15 years of retirement, Ashley read an article about substitute teaching

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Better Treatments Sought for Neurological Diseases

Date: February 1st, 2007

William Shakespeare famously described life’s seven stages, none of them in especially happy terms. The final stage of old age is “second childishness and mere oblivion/Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything.” Most people with neurological conditions aren’t quite that decrepit, but Shakespeare’s words from “As You Like It” seem to capture accurately the helplessness of mind and body that gradually overtakes people with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. So far, there are no cures for these two most common neurological


Treatment Advances Help Diabetics Better Manage the Disease Yet More Research is Needed

Date: February 1st, 2007

If you don’t know someone with diabetes, chances are that you will sometime soon. Even as the prevalence of other chronic diseases slows, this serious condition is exploding as the population grows older, heavier and more sedentary. “This is one of the few chronic diseases that’s growing at an alarming pace,” said Dr. John Anderson at a recent briefing in Washington, D.C. Anderson is assistant clinical professor of medicine at Vanderbilt University and incoming chair of theAmerican Diabetes Association’s (ADA advocacy committee.

Related Topics: Diabetes


Taking Delirium Seriously

Date: February 1st, 2007

For more than one in five patients over 65, hospital stays are complicated by frightening bouts of confusion known as delirium. Delirium is disturbing, yet it is common enough that many people think it is simply a side effect of serious illness — harmless in its own right. But research has shown that delirium episodes are in fact dangerous, and may be indications that something else is wrong. What is delirium? Delirium is a type of brain dysfunction. Many patients who experience it


Joe Ichiuji: Preserving the Legacy of Japanese-American Veterans

Date: February 1st, 2007

Eighty-eight year old Joe Ichiuji knows firsthand how easily freedom is lost. In 1941 shortly after Joe was drafted and had completed basic training, the U.S. government moved 120,000 Japanese Americans into internment camps. Even though many were American citizens, they were suspected of being disloyal. “I was told, ‘You’ve been discharged.’ Because of my Japanese ancestry they thought I was unfit for service.” His family was moved from Monterey, California, to a camp in Arizona that was surrounded by barbed

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Personalized Medicine Takes a Bow

Date: October 1st, 2006

In 1953, an American biochemist and a British physicist working together in Cambridge, England, identified the structure of DNA — the molecule of life — which passes genetic information from one generation to another. This discovery has unleashed an explosion of knowledge over the last half-century leading directly to the Human Genome Project and to the promise of personalized medicine. According to the Personalized Medicine Coalition, people vary from one another in many ways — what they eat, the types and amount of stress


Don't Outsource Stem-Cell Research

Date: October 1st, 2006

In July 2006, President George W. Bush used the first veto of his presidency to block a Congressional bill that would have lifted his 2001 ban on federal funding for most stem-cell research. In vetoing this legislation, Bush defied a bipartisan effort in Congress and the wishes of a majority of the American public. Nearly three-quarters of Americans support embryonic stem cell research, according to a May 2006 poll conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation. History will look back and see the Bush


Imagine What's Next: In Pursuit of the Longevity Dividend

Date: October 1st, 2006

This month the Alliance for Aging Research celebrates the 20th anniversary of our founding as a not-for-profit organization working to increase support for research to extend the healthy years of life. Twenty years ago, the science of aging was at the bottom of medical research priorities and lacked prestige as an academic discipline. Of the 11 federal health research institutes at the time, the National Institute of Aging ranked 10th in terms of budget and only a handful of scientists


Professor Robert W. Fogel: A New Kind of Historian

Date: October 1st, 2006

A startling change in the human species has taken place over the past 100 years, according to Nobel Laureate Robert W. Fogel, director of the Center for Population Economics and a professor in the Graduate School of Business at the University of Chicago. Fogel and his colleagues have found that people in industrialized countries are taller, heavier, and living dramatically longer than they did a century ago. In 1900, only 13 percent of 65-year-olds would live to 85. Today, nearly

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


What Men Don't Know About Their Health and Aging Can Hurt Them

Date: July 1st, 2006

If you are a middle-aged or older man, do you assume that a decline in energy, low libido, moodiness, and weight gain are just part of “normal aging”? If so, you are like many American men who do not understand that these symptoms may be a sign of low testosterone (Low T), an often treatable condition. Low T is known medically as hypogonadism and can be accompanied by fatigue, inability to concentrate, increased irritability or depression, reduced muscle mass and strength,

Related Topics: Men's Health


Unerstanding the Effects of Grapefruit Juice on Medications

Date: July 1st, 2006

For more than a decade, doctors have known that some compound in grapefruit juice interacts with a small number of drugs to triple the amount of that drug absorbed into the bloodstream. While the compound has remained a mystery, doctors simply tell their patients to avoid grapefruit juice while on the medication. In a study published in the May issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, however, Paul Watkins, MD, and his colleagues, finally tracked down furanocoumarins as the active


Make Alzheimer's a National Priority

Date: July 1st, 2006

A Pending Epidemic It’s a disease that is universally fatal; there is no cure at present; and one out of 10 people over 65 will be diagnosed with it. It already affects millions of Americans at the cost of billions, and as baby boomers swell the ranks of the elderly, it could potentially break our health care system. But it has yet to be recognized as a national health priority. "It" is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a devastating neurological disease that destroys brain


Preparing for the Silver Tsunami

Date: July 1st, 2006

Whenever you open a newspaper or magazine these days, you’re likely to find an article exhorting baby boomers to plan for retirement—telling them to save more, to learn about portfolio planning, and to project their financial needs for decades to come. This focus on financial health may improve the state of boomers’ wallets, but it ignores the single greatest issue that will affect their quality of life in retirement: the high probability of chronic disease. The Alliance for Aging Research reports

Related Topics: Aging Research


Dr. Henry A. Essex: A Life of Service and Adventure

Date: July 1st, 2006

Veterans who meet Dr. Henry A. Essex at the Veterans Affairs (VA) Center in Providence, Rhode Island are fortunate to encounter a man who deeply understands them and their experiences. At 89, Essex is a veteran himself of a distinguished Army career that spanned two wars, in which he was as a doctor, field surgeon, chief of orthopedics and surgery, and hospital administrator. Throughout, he steadily advanced in responsibility and remained open to new experiences. ”I’m interested in the experiences of other

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Ten Medical Innovations to Watch

Date: May 4th, 2006

Thanks to new medical innovations, every five years for the past 30 years, life expectancies have been extended by a year. New discoveries have practically eliminated diseases such as smallpox and polio and have reduced human suffering from countless conditions. Scientists have turned their attention to eradicating cancer, heart disease, and diabetes and medical research and resulting innovations are bringing us closer than ever to preventions, treatments, and cures for these and other deadly and disabling diseases. Here are 10 promising


Bob Haldeman Believes in Wellness

Date: May 4th, 2006

At 65, Haldeman is an avid cyclist and competitor in the Senior Olympics and has been athletic and active his entire life. But to Haldeman, wellness means much more than just physical fitness. It means holistic wellness that incorporates not only the body, but also the mind and the spirit. While it does involve physical fitness, it strengthens much more than the muscles. Cycling, for example, is just one of the many sports that he shares with his family members of

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


The Power of Tea

Date: May 1st, 2006

You’ve heard the news – drinking tea is good for your health. But did you know that tea may reduce your risk of heart disease, cancer, and other chronic diseases, and that it may improve the health of your bones and teeth? The History of Tea As legend has it, tea drinking began in China over 5,000 years ago when tea leaves blew into a boiling pot of water that was being prepared for Emperor Shen Nung. The Emperor was curious about

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Invsting in NIH

Date: May 1st, 2006

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) predict that in the near future, doctors will have the ability to identify life-threatening diseases years before they strike and that new treatments for cancer, heart disease, and diabetes are just years away from discovery. **Update - March 16th, 2006** With a vote of 51-49, the Senate passed a $2.8 trillion 2006 budget resolution that includes $7 billion for health and education. The Specter/Harkin Amendment adds $7 billion discretionary spending to programs of the


Medical Innovation: A Long-Term Vision

Date: May 1st, 2006

As the first members of the Baby Boom generation turn 60, a national dialogue is gaining momentum concerning the impact that our exploding senior demographics will have on our already over-burdened health care system. Our society is aging, living longer, and facing a new challenge of unprecedented levels of chronic disease. The public and policymakers are understandably worried about soaring health care costs and what the future will bring. While people are living longer, healthier lives as a result of ever-improving


Innovation Helps Cancer Patients Live Longer

Date: February 1st, 2006

New drugs and other treatments for cancer are helping more Americans survive the disease, even as it affects an increasing number of people, a trio of experts said at a briefing in Washington, D.C., in October. "We are in the midst of a revolution," said J. Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, deputy chief medical officer at the American Cancer Society, based in Atlanta. "Now there's real hope." New therapies, in combination with higher screening rates and better diagnostics, have resulted in better medical outcomes for

Related Topics: Cancer


Steps to Brain Fitness

Date: February 1st, 2006

There is a lot we can do to keep our brains healthy and potentially prevent or lessen the cognitive decline that often comes with aging. The Alliance for Aging Research and the Brain Resource Company have teamed up to bring information and resources on brain health to the public and to provide the WebNeuro test, a cognitive assessment that can be taken on personal computers, free to the first one million users.* Regular screening of your everyday thinking skills is important in the

Related Topics: Brain Health


CMS Should Maintain Focus on Prevention

Date: February 1st, 2006

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is the federal agency that administers Medicare, Medicaid, and related programs, to ensure that beneficiaries are aware of health care services and that these services are accessible. CMS' mission includes a commitment to policies and actions that promote efficiency and quality in health care delivery. In recent years, CMS has demonstrated an increasing focus on disease prevention. Access to routine preventive screenings and vaccinations has improved. CMS has also made strides in educating beneficiaries about


Increased Funding Critical to FDA's Success

Date: February 1st, 2006

As the nation's foremost consumer protection agency, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, (FDA) serves a critical role, safeguarding not only prescription and non-prescription drugs, but also medical devices, dietary supplements, animal drugs and feeds, and the nation's food supply. The FDA has proven its effectiveness, when provided with adequate resources. For example, before Congress passed the 1992 Prescription Drug User Fee Act it took an average of 30 months to review new medications. The Act allows FDA to collect fees from


Ruth Colley--Re-living a Dream: Going for the Gold

Date: February 1st, 2006

Seven years ago, Ruth Colley had the opportunity to re-live her dream when Olympic gold medalist Frank Havens invited her to compete in the 1998 Nike World Masters Games. Colley was the first American woman to qualify for the United States Olympic Kayak team for the 1952 Helsinki games. Unfortunately, because she was the only woman to qualify for the 10-person team, she never got the opportunity to compete. Colley's love for the water started when she was a child. "I think

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Caregiver Involvement Leads to Better Cancer Outcomes

Date: October 1st, 2005

Those who have been diagnosed with colon cancer will tell you that the support of friends and relatives is invaluable. A survey of over 100 oncologists shows that physicians agree, and that caregiver involvement can lead to better disease outcomes in elderly colon cancer patients. The survey, commissed by the Alliance for Aging Research, was conducted as part of the program “Colon Cancer: Caring for the Aging,” that aims to increase awareness about the importance of caregiver involvement in disease management


Living to 100 and Beyond

Date: October 1st, 2005

First-born daughters are three times more likely to survive to age 100 than their latter-born sisters; and first-born sons are twice as likely to become centenarians as those sons born fourth, fifth, or sixth in the family, according to a new study prepared for the Society of Actuaries (SOA). The study, which looked at family data for nearly 1,000 centenarians, shows that birth order, place of birth, and even birth month may be linked to longevity. So what are those links?

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


National Institutes of Health Funding

Date: October 1st, 2005

It’s that time again, the annual struggle over funding for the National Institutes of Health. The latest negotiations between the House and Senate yielded a proposal for an NIH budget increase of one-half of one percent for fiscal year 2006, the smallest increase since the 1970s. But, just before the Thanksgiving recess, the House rejected the bill. The following day, the Senate voted to send the bill back to a conference committee to reach an acceptable compromise. The Good News When the


Longevity in the Short-Term

Date: October 1st, 2005

At the Alliance for Aging Research, we are committed to a vision of healthy longevity for millions of Americans, made possible through advances in science and technology. We focus on research and initiatives that show promise for realization 10, 20, even 50 years from now. For many people, however, aging cannot wait 10 years because it is immediate and everyday. Even though Americans in the 21st century are already benefiting from scientific progress and living longer, healthier lives, growing older still


Myrvin H. Ellestad, MD: Life-long Learner

Date: October 1st, 2005

Around the world, the name Myrvin Ellestad is synonymous with groundbreaking work in cardiology. Not surprising – for the past 50 years, Ellestad has been a leader in cardiac research and practice. But Myrvin Ellestad is more than an esteemed cardiologist. In his native California, he is also known as an author, family man, anthropology buff, active community member, and an all-around great guy. Indeed, at 84, Myrvin Ellestad is a man who doesn’t sit still. In addition to serving as the

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


The Family Healthcare CEO

Date: July 1st, 2005

Having a healthy family is so important to women, they give their family’s health more priority than their own. This is according to Women Talk, a national survey commissioned by the National Women’s Health Resource Center (NWHRC) which explores women’s knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions about their health. In fact, when asked to define what “being healthy” meant to them, more survey respondents chose “having a healthy family” than any other definition, including “being physically active” and “not having chronic diseases.” It may

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Learning More About Breast Cancer

Date: July 1st, 2005

Gatherings of breast cancer researchers have been surprisingly upbeat events lately, as scientists are beginning to feel that maybe - just maybe - they’re making some real progress toward understanding the disease. “It’s actually amazing,” said Jennifer Eng-Wong, M.D., M.P.H., a medical oncologist with the National Cancer Institute, a division of the National Institutes of Health. “We just had our big oncology meeting and at the end of the presentation of the studies for breast cancer, the response was overwhelming elation

Related Topics: Cancer


Diseases in the Shadows

Date: July 1st, 2005

Walking. Driving. Working. Most of us take these activities for granted, but millions of elderly Americans do not because they cannot fully care for themselves. In many cases, little-understood diseases are to blame. The loss of independence that results from frailty, falls and other conditions costs the nation billions of dollars for care in nursing homes, assisted-living facilities and private homes. “What drives these costs are not the big-name, marquee diseases…but diseases that are little known,” says Daniel Perry, executive director of


Stem Cell Debate

Date: July 1st, 2005

The following editorial is submitted by Daniel Perry, President of the Coalition for the Advancement for Medical Research (CAMR) President Bush will disagree, but the House of Representatives has handed him a gift for his second term: a chance to update his Administration’s stem cell policy in a way that would earn him bi-partisan praise for returning American scientists to the forefront of this fast-moving medical frontier. The recent House vote, which garnered a sizeable majority including 50 Republicans, expands the current


Don Robertson: The Voice of Happy Retirement

Date: July 1st, 2005

As the “Voice of CBS Sports” for 25 years, Don Robertson used his exceptional vocal cords to make a living. As a retiree, he uses that gift in more personal ways. Robertson worked most of his career as a staff announcer for CBS, introducing on-air talent and recording promos and commercial “billboards” – spots that identified the sponsors of a particular broadcast. Robertson’s talents enabled him to cross paths with a number of notable figures, from the sports world and beyond.

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Woman's Breaking Point

Date: April 1st, 2005

A new national survey reveals too many physicians misread or do not even ask about the fears of their osteoporosis patients and inferentially suggests this may be one more reason why many patients do not stick with their medications. According to the Women’s Bone Health Survey conducted by the Opinion Research Corporation in collaboration with the Alliance, more than half of the polled women say they take their medications to remain healthy and independent, yet two-thirds of the surveyed doctors believe avoiding bone


Tiny Tales

Date: April 1st, 2005

We are on the verge of a new age of discovery that would pique the curiosity of Galileo, Newton, and Einstein. In the heavens, we have glimpsed a solar system outside of our own whose glimmers of light will tell us much about the molecules of the distant planets’ atmospheres. On earth, we have developed new tools to see, move, and actually change the properties of molecules around us—and in us. And this has led to tantalizing questions. What if doctors

Related Topics: Cancer


A Time to Commit

Date: April 1st, 2005

Despite scientific evidence that a cure for Parkinson’s disease could be near – perhaps no more than five years away – the National Institutes of Health was recently unable to initiate clinical trials to test four new Parkinson’s drugs. The NIH also found itself unable to launch a clinical trial network to test new therapies for age-related macular degeneration, and had to postpone the production and clinical testing of four potential pandemic influenza vaccines by at least a year. Advances in


Barriers to Healthy Aging

Date: April 1st, 2005

Older Americans know how to maintain their health, but they see obstacles in the path to a healthy lifestyle. That’s the bottom line from a new survey by the American Public Health Association. The survey was conducted in conjunction with National Public Health Week 2005, April 4-10. It looked at how Americans 55 and older view their own health and their understanding of what they can do to stay healthy as they age, and asked them to identify what they think

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Virgie Harris-Bovelle: A Life Full of Heart

Date: April 1st, 2005

Virgie Harris-Bovelle, 70, lives with an implanted defibrillator - a device that automatically shocks her heart out of an irregular rhythm. She never knows when the device will fire, and when it does, she knows that it may have just saved her life. The diagnosis that resulted in the defibrillator changed Harris-Bovelle’s life, but not in the ways you might expect. For her, learning that she has heart disease has opened doors and ushered her into a personal era she

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Caught in the Act of Leading

Date: February 1st, 2005

Scientists searching for a way to delay the aging process may have found it in an intervention that many Americans battle with again and again—cutting calories. When used as a lifestyle choice, calorie restriction yields a significantly healthier and prolonged life. Calorie restriction (CR)—under nutrition without malnutrition—is the only intervention that has been documented in laboratory animals to increase the average life span, or the average number of years an animal is expected to live, and maximum life span—the maximum number

Related Topics: Aging Research


The Eyes Have It

Date: February 1st, 2005

Stem cells could hold the key to stopping and even reversing the blinding effects of aging, according to recent research. Many scientists have long felt that embryonic stem cells could halt the progression of or even cure a number of degenerative diseases. Their hope has been that researchers could coax stem cells to grow into healthy cells of any type - cells that doctors could then use to replace damaged cells in patients affected by disease. Eye research is one of

Related Topics: Vision Loss


Medical Errors: How Many is Too Many?

Date: February 1st, 2005

Potentially deadly mistakes continue to plague U.S. hospitals, according to a new report. The study, which analyzed three years of Medicare patient records, estimates that medical errors cause an average of 195,000 in-hospital deaths per year. HealthGrades, a health care quality monitoring company, conducted the research. Their figure is more than twice the previous estimate from a landmark study conducted in 1999 by the Institute of Medicine. Different methodologies account for much of the difference, but experts are quick to emphasize


Bernice Gorell: The Polish Lady on Pulaski

Date: February 1st, 2005

Bernice Gorell recently missed a couple of days of work. The 93-year-old had cataract surgery on a Thursday and didn’t go back into her office until ... Monday. When Gorell doesn’t go to work, people miss her. She is an immigration counselor with her own business in suburban Chicago. She has helped people with citizenship and immigration status issues for more than 40 years, and has developed a reputation for dogged determination, intellectual curiosity, and fearlessness that make her very good

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


What You Should Know About BPH

Date: October 1st, 2004

As they get older, many men find themselves making more nightly trips to the bathroom. They may fear that this sort of problem is an unavoidable consequence of aging, or - worse - a sign that they have prostate cancer. The good news is that urinary difficulties are most likely a sign of BPH - a common and treatable condition that affects half of men over 50. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia is the technical term for prostate enlargement that is not caused


Every Vote Counts for Aging Issues

Date: October 1st, 2004

Americans' choice for president in 2004 will have a direct impact on the lives of seniors. The policies that surround this year's campaign issues will determine whether retirees can afford health care and have enough money to live on. They will shape how we are cared for in the future by funding - and providing guidelines for - research into defeating the diseases that shorten and degrade our lives. With so much at stake, this is no year to sit on


The Importance of Aging Research

Date: October 1st, 2004

Consider this: In the year 1902, if it had been somehow possible to gather together everyone in America who had reached the age of 85 or older, that population would have scarcely made up a single Zip Code in today's Sun Belt. Today, the numbers of people age 85 and above, about 5 million Americans, will increase four-fold with the aging of the Baby Boom. People aged 100 or more - currently some 70,000 - will increase 10 times before

Related Topics: Aging Research


Dr. Edward Keller: The Write Stuff

Date: October 1st, 2004

Dr. Edward Keller, a Dickinson dentist who retired in 1996, knows that very well. He has created a fulfilling second career by writing seven books and self-publishing five of them, resulting in a total of 25,000 copies. In the works is a new children's book receiving final touches from David Christy, a Fargo illustrator. The books mostly relate to Keller's German-Russian roots and his early years while growing up near Strasburg, where he was born in 1927. The stories are memory

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Atrial Fibrillation

Date: July 1st, 2004

Most of us are happy to make adjustments in our lives now if we know they may reduce our chances of developing health problems later. That's why knowing our risk for medical problems is so important. We may not be able to change certain risk factors, such as age or heredity, but many are within our control. Yet according to a survey conducted by the Alliance, more than three-fourths of Americans are unaware of one of the main risk factors for


Here's to a Long, Long Life with Health and Happiness Too

Date: July 1st, 2004

If you could swallow a little yellow pill and live to be 120 years old, would you? Would your good health hold out that long? Would your retirement savings last for 50 years? Could society sustain an explosion of "super seniors"? The benefits and consequences of scientific breakthroughs in life extension were debated at a medical conference in Newark, NJ in April entitled, "Creating Very Old People: Individual Blessing? Or Societal Disaster?" While there is no magic bullet, no little yellow

Related Topics: Aging Research


Leadership, Commitment, Hope: The 21st Century Challenge

Date: July 1st, 2004

The 20th century witnessed amazing advances in human health and longevity thanks to public health measures and medical research breakthroughs. The 20th century witnessed amazing advances in human health and longevity thanks to public health measures and medical research breakthroughs. Because of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the United States has led the world in reducing the impact of scores of diseases. The achievements of NIH are burnished by bipartisan political support and the unwavering faith that Americans place in


Stem Cell Update

Date: July 1st, 2004

Patient advocates for a variety of debilitating and deadly diseases are banding together to step up research into stem cell science, which may hold very real hope for treatments or cures. Frustrated by what they see as the federal government's insufficient funding of the research, these supporters are taking their cause to the states. Stem cells develop at the beginning of the embryonic stage and go on to create all the tissues that make up a human body. Because they can


John Young: Physically Active and Young at Heart

Date: July 1st, 2004

Retiring and taking it easy isn't a part of John Young's life plan. At age 76, Young still works 30 hours per week as owner of his firm, Young Engineers & Surveyors, in Hollidaysburg, PA, plays racquetball and tennis competitively, skis in the winter, and is actively involved in community activities. As a consultant for Hoss's Steak and Sea Houses restaurant chain, Young visits the restaurant home office every day, using the onsite racquetball court to compete with players of all

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Do You Know Your Life Expectancy?

Date: April 1st, 2004

For those of you familiar with the Alliance for Aging Research website, you may have already experienced our most popular interactive feature…the "Living to 100" quiz, a tool that calculates your longevity potential. For veterans of the quiz and for new visitors, we have good news! Based upon the latest research on centenarians, the calculator has been updated in hopes of helping still more people be at least centenarian-like and live well into their older years spending the majority of


All Roads Lead to...Sardinia!?

Date: April 1st, 2004

A drug now in clinical trials for treatment of type 2 diabetes could eventually be used to promote longevity by treating or preventing major age-related diseases. Scientists studying the drug fluasterone, a synthetic steroid, have so far shown that the drug lowers blood triglyceride levels, which are abnormally high in those with diabetes. They are now focusing on the fundamental question of whether it lowers blood glucose levels, and hope to have the drug on the market within a few years. But


Detecting Depression Before It's Too Late

Date: April 1st, 2004

Spring may be a time of renewal, but it is also the peak suicide season, when the incidence of death rises with the warmer temperatures. Older adults with depression are especially at risk this time of year, yet few will receive medical attention. Psychologists have speculated that depressed, suicidal individuals survive the winter clinging to the hope that spring will rejuvenate their lives. When spring arrives, however, their expectations are dashed as life continues as before and the depression persists. Year

Related Topics: Mental Illness


Norman G. Anderson: The Scientific Explorer

Date: April 1st, 2004

At an age when most people are winding down, Norman G. Anderson can't stop working. He keeps inventing things. "There are always new problems to solve," says Anderson, 85, a biochemist. The most recent of his more than 31 patents issued March 9. He's got 36 more pending. Anderson's latest invention, a "flight information visualization system," presents an innovative design that allows pilots to fly more easily at night and in bad weather. The system, which isn't used yet in any planes,

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Anti-Aging: Hype v. Reality

Date: February 1st, 2004

Very real remedies that will stop or reverse the aging process may ultimately be discovered, but for now, save your money to spend on a health club membership. That's the consensus among leading scientists researching the subject of aging. They say that there is no "cure" for aging-yet. However, there is still plenty you can do to stay as healthy and active as possible well into your later years. Untested treatments may be ineffective or even dangerous Dr. Jay Olshansky is a professor

Related Topics: Aging Research


The Secret Genes of Centenarians

Date: February 1st, 2004

If you have lived beyond the age of 100, countless people may ask you for your secret to long life. The truth is you probably haven't a clue, but you may theorize that it has been a result of your clean living, or even your occasional indulgences. Researchers are asking the question in scientific studies of centenarians because they think you really do have a secret. And it may have to do with your genes. So if your answer was something

Related Topics: Aging Research


Champagne Wishes and Geriatric Dreams

Date: February 1st, 2004

Those inclined to celebrate the just-passed huge and historic expansion of Medicare should pause in their champagne toasts to consider this: most doctors, nurses and other health professionals in the U.S. receive almost no formal training in geriatrics, which seriously undermines the quality of care - especially safe prescription drug therapy - for America's seniors. It may be the biggest disconnect in American health care. The much needed Medicare prescription drug benefit will increase access to potent new medications. But what


First, Do No Harm to Basic Research

Date: February 1st, 2004

This article originally ran on www.techcentralstation.com. By Morton Kondracke President Bush and the Republican Congress are on the verge of wreaking havoc upon on America's preeminent medical research system, at the same depriving themselves of a glowing political legacy. Republicans have stood firmly for free inquiry and free markets over the decades. Yet, in short order, the Bush administration, for ideological reasons, is squashing the most transformative areas of biomedical research -- stem cell and cloning research -- while, for budgetary reasons, slashing basic


Bill Wellington: The Return of the Ice Age

Date: February 1st, 2004

Bill Wellington has some pretty high praise for the doctor who performed his double hip replacement surgery, Dr. Patrick Caulfield of Bethesda, Maryland. "They saved my hockey life," he said. Hockey may not be the first priority for many hip replacement patients, but it's pretty important to this 82-year-old founder of Maryland's first senior hockey team, the Geri-Hatricks. Wellington has been an avid hockey player since his days of playing what he calls "old-fashioned, no-frills" hockey on frozen ponds as a teenager

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Less Might Be More

Date: October 1st, 2003

If you have osteoarthritis, your least expensive option for treatment might also be the most effective. You already know that the cost of pain management can be quite expensive, especially as it adds up over years of keeping this chronic condition under control so you can enjoy your life. That's why medical organizations leading the fight against arthritis have issued guidelines for managing pain that emphasize trying cheaper, simpler remedies first. The American College of Rheumatology and the American Pain Society both

Related Topics: Arthritis


Is Red Wine Flowing From the Fountain of Youth?

Date: October 1st, 2003

In the search for ways to lengthen the human lifespan and extend good health further into old age, scientists had until now found only one program that demonstrated real promise: severe calorie restriction. However, researchers at Harvard have touched upon a discovery that Americans might find a great deal more palatable. Resveratrol, a compound found most abundantly in red wine, has been shown to stimulate an anti-aging enzyme active within living cells. This enzyme protects cells from stresses that would ordinarily

Related Topics: Aging Research


Ageism--Part II: Prevention and Treatment for the Elderly

Date: October 1st, 2003

The perception of older Americans as frail, dependent, and isolated may be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Ageism, this prejudice that subtly dehumanizes older people and influences the way they are treated by society, is the subject of a revealing report published by the Alliance for Aging Research. In Ageism: How Healthcare Fails the Elderly, the Alliance cites mounting evidence of the ways in which ageism pervades our healthcare system and prevents older people from receiving optimal healthcare. This in turn leads to


Advancing Quantity and Quality of Life

Date: October 1st, 2003

In the August 12th issue of the New York Times, writer Nicholas Kristof editorialized on what he sees as the ambiguous, and often rogue nature of aging research. In his article, he gave readers the unfortunate impression that researchers on aging are careening along on a dangerous road to human immortality. The Alliance for Aging Research felt compelled to post our reaction to this column. In fact, America's aging researchers are targeted on much more immediate targets than human immortality: curing

Related Topics: Aging Research


Bob Hope: A Legend that Will Live On

Date: October 1st, 2003

Leslie Townes Hope worked as a shoe salesman, a stock boy, and even a boxer before he found his true calling. But when you saw the ease with which he tossed out one-liners onstage and waited for the audience to catch up, it was hard to believe he was ever anyone other than Bob Hope, America's enduring entertainment legend. Building on some dance classes he had during and after high school, Hope got his start as an entertainer with a vaudeville

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Sun and Skin: An Unhealthy Partnership

Date: July 1st, 2003

After a long winter spent inside, many of us welcome the appearance of the sun and the return of warm weather. Unfortunately, the excitement of summer may be tempered by worries about the effects the sun has on our skin. These concerns are legitimate, considering that the sun is responsible for more than 90 percent of all skin cancer cases. The good news is that you can get out and enjoy summer safely if you follow a few simple steps to


Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Date: July 1st, 2003

The eyes are the first to go, the old adage says. And that means more than simply struggling to read the fine print as we grow older. Aging increases the risk of macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in older Americans. Age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, causes sight loss in the central field of vision, although peripheral vision remains intact. Central vision is what enables us to read, drive a car, recognize faces, and other activities that call for

Related Topics: Vision Loss


It's a Matter of Ageism: Part I

Date: July 1st, 2003

The perception of older Americans as frail, dependent, and isolated may be a self-fulfilling prophecy. Ageism, this prejudice that subtly dehumanizes older people and influences the way they are treated by society, is the subject of a revealing new report published by the Alliance for Aging Research. In Ageism: How Healthcare Fails the Elderly, the Alliance cites mounting evidence of the ways in which ageism pervades our healthcare system and prevents older people from receiving optimal healthcare. This in turn leads to


Dr. Marie-Louise Johnson: The Sensitive Skin Doctor

Date: July 1st, 2003

Dr. Kenneth Johnson has considered encouraging his wife to retire and step "out of the trenches," but he has abandoned the thought. He is a practical man. "I knew she would have to have something very interesting and worthwhile to get her to retire and leave her patients," he said. Johnson's wife is Dr. Marie-Louise Johnson, 76, a dermatologist who operates a practice in Kingston, N.Y. But if you want her to be your dermatologist, you'll have to wait more than a

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


The Tough Decisions Behind Hormone Therapy

Date: April 1st, 2003

Women have relied on hormone therapy for decades to relieve symptoms of menopause. But with last year's dramatic announcement about the risks of hormone therapy, women suddenly faced an agonizing choice: Was relief from hot flashes really worth the increased risk of heart disease or breast cancer? The National Institutes of Health study, known as the Women's Health Initiative, found that the most common form of hormone therapy, estrogen-progestin pills, significantly increased the risk of stroke, heart disease, and breast cancer. NIH

Related Topics: Women's Health


The Long and Short of It: The Age Link to Telomeres

Date: April 1st, 2003

The tiny "caps" that keep our chromosomes from fusing together are also providing clues that could eventually lead to the achievement of one our nation's most important public health goals: extending good health well into old age. These caps are called telomeres, and they're at the center of much of the current research into the aging process. A study recently published in science journal The Lancet links the lengths of telomeres with rate of survival among people over 60, the first study to

Related Topics: Aging Research


Frequently Asked Questions About Therapeutic Clonin

Date: April 1st, 2003

Many of you have probably heard much of the dialogue in the cloning controversy. Between the opinion articles in your local paper and the national news that a religious sect claimed to have successfully cloned a human, cloning technology is often in the news. Unfortunately, much of this sort of news draws attention to reproductive cloning, which is widely and sensibly opposed, and thus fuels public uncertainty over the use of a science that holds great promise for curing deadly diseases. Groups


Operation NIH Funding

Date: April 1st, 2003

The Washington Times Operation NIH Funding January 16, 2003  Section: OPED H. Norman Schwarzkopf, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES When you have brought the enemy to its knees, you do not turn tail and give up the fight. This axiom of military strategy appears to be lost on the nation's lawmakers, who stand poised to deprive medical researchers of the dollars they need to see their wars on disease through to the finish. Just as they deliver funds to protect the homeland in the name


Ruth Garner: The First Lady of Potsdam

Date: April 1st, 2003

Mayor Ruth Garner is rarely challenged in an election and when she is, she wins convincingly. She is practically an institution in Potsdam, N.Y., the town she has called home all her life. And at a time when politicians are often viewed with suspicion, the village of Potsdam will stick with its outspoken mayor, thank you very much. "She's pretty darned candid," said Michael Weil, village administrator. "If you're afraid of what she is going to say, don't ask." At 87, Garner

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


The Costs of Being a Woman!

Date: February 1st, 2003

It's no secret that chronic illnesses are costly to treat. But until now, few had any idea just how costly. A recent study examined three diseases that strike women especially hard - cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and stress urinary incontinence. The results show that these diseases have the potential to cripple you financially as well as physically. For example, it can cost $423,000 over a woman's lifetime to treat her cardiovascular disease and the conditions associated with it, such as high blood pressure and

Related Topics: Women's Health


Don't Be Such a Pain!

Date: February 1st, 2003

Pain is an unpleasant subject. Whether it's a knee that acts up when the weather changes or that nagging twinge in your lower back, pain is something we all experience occasionally. Pain is nature's way of telling you something is wrong, so it's not something to be ignored - as if we could. Experts generally define pain in two ways:  Everyday pain can be caused by a variety of things, including muscle strains and sprains, tendonitis, bursitis, tooth and gum disease, sore feet,

Related Topics: Persistent Pain


Respect Your Elders

Date: February 1st, 2003

We see them sometimes on the evening news-stories about another scam targeting the elderly or the discovery of an employee physically abusing residents of a long-term care facility. The images are sickening: seniors, often isolated from families and friends, are victimized by opportunistic strangers, caretakers, even family members. But how widespread are these problems, really? How vulnerable are older people to these types of abuse? Unfortunately, the problem is more widespread than we would like to believe, although the data are


This Election's Unhealthy Debate Over Health Care

Date: February 1st, 2003

By Daniel Perry The just-finished political campaign was a missed opportunity by candidates from both political parties to talk about how to truly improve health in America. Now that Election Day is behind us, let's hope our elected officials can move past the heated rhetoric and start to really make positive changes in the U.S. health care system. Political consultants this year advised candidates to turn the industry that researches and develops our medicines into a political punching bag. Of course, any


Frank Mankiewicz: "Revolutionary" On the Inside

Date: February 1st, 2003

If you're a lobbyist for a well-known Washington, D.C., public relations firm, it pays to know people. In fact, knowing people is pretty much what you are paid to do. Frank Mankiewicz knows a few people. His resume reads like the blue pages in the District of Columbia phone book: president of National Public Radio, regional director for the Peace Corps in Latin America, campaign manager for 1972 Presidential nominee George McGovern, and press secretary to the legendary Senator Robert F. Kennedy,

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


A New Class of Medical Tests

Date: October 1st, 2002

Cholesterol checks, mammograms, prostate exams-all these screenings have become routine as science discovers ways to detect disease at its earliest and most treatable stages. So what about new tests that have been gaining attention in news reports lately? Are they more hope, or just hype? The truth is, some of both. There may be promising new blood tests on the horizon to help physicians determine which patients are at risk for developing heart disease. The increasingly widespread use of diagnostic imaging

Related Topics: Prevention


Restricting Your Diet, Testing Your Willpower

Date: October 1st, 2002

Want to live longer? Just eat less -- a lot less. Some say that cutting calories may well be the key to longer life that researchers have been seeking for generations. Caloric Restriction, or "CR," as it's known, is by no means a new theory. For some 60 years, scientists have proven repeatedly that feeding lab animals about one-third fewer calories than normal was a sure-fire way of extending their lifespan. The technique worked consistently, whether the animals were worms or fruit flies,

Related Topics: Aging Research


Get Mad...And Vote!

Date: October 1st, 2002

Campaign commercials, local politician appearances, and issue rallies can only mean one thing…The election season is quickly approaching! The Alliance for Aging Research urges you to think about the political healthcare issues that will ultimately affect your health, form your opinions on these hot topic and vote! The Alliance sees the following issues as areas of social and scientific debate that will ultimately affect how we all age. We express our opinions below, but invite you to learn more about the


Science Got Us Into This Mess, and Science Will Get Us Out

Date: October 1st, 2002

One hundred years ago, when life expectancy for a newborn in the United States was less than 50 years, there wasn't a lot of worry over how to care for massive numbers of older Americans. Back when only one of every 25 Americans reached the age of 65 - and 65 was considered old! - U.S. politics didn't give much attention to something called the "Graying of America." Words like "geriatrics" and "Alzheimer's Disease" hadn't even entered our vocabulary. To appreciate why population

Related Topics: Aging Research


Jane Scott: Rock of Ages

Date: October 1st, 2002

Years past the age many would consider time to retire from any job, especially a job that is traditionally filled by the young and hip, Jane Scott was grooving with audience members young enough to be her grandkids as rock critic for the Cleveland Plain Dealer. Scott retired this year just shy of her 83rd birthday, an icon who has spent nearly 40 years immersed in an industry defined by its appeal to the young and notorious for here-today-gone-tomorrow personalities. Even when she began

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Adding Luster to Your Golden Years

Date: July 1st, 2002

Exercise may well hold the key to the fountain of youth. Besides boosting longevity, getting fit is one of the most important steps older adults can take to maintain their mobility, independence and quality of life. Gone are the days when growing old gracefully meant slowing down and taking it easy. For the 77 million baby boomers born between 1946 and 1964 it means just the opposite. Inactivity, not aging is the culprit behind chronic conditions such as heart disease,

Related Topics: Prevention


Mental Illness: Closer to Home Than You Think

Date: July 1st, 2002

"A Beautiful Mind," last year's Academy Award winner for Best Picture, took us on an extraordinary journey into the mind of a brilliant man suffering from mental illness. As viewers, we were able to appreciate, admire, and sympathize with John Nash as he struggled to accept his illness. The movie delivered an important lesson…Mental illness can affect anyone and, if left untreated, it can harm both the mind and body. As portrayed in the movie, mental illness in today's society is

Related Topics: Mental Illness


Medicare Gaps: What's Not Covered

Date: July 1st, 2002

Medicare, simply stated, is the government's contract that it will provide healthcare insurance coverage for older Americans. But as with all contracts, it pays to read the fine print. And that's when the jarring gaps begin to emerge. In Medicare's desperate attempt to cope with the initial high costs for all the newest medical and technological advances, many are suffering the affects of prevention and treatment denial. Consider mental health care, a significant concern among older Americans. Medicare requires patients to


Road Rage Lookout...Here Comes Diet Rage!

Date: July 1st, 2002

In May of this year, the Alliance For Aging Research conducted our annual survey on Baby Boomers. This year, with the help from Quaker Oats, we focused our attention on Baby Boomer attitudes toward aging and nutrition. We found some really interesting results! The survey, "A New Age of Aging - A Study of Baby Boomer Behaviors on Growing Older," shows that while they express anxiety about aging, America's 75 million Baby Boomers as a group are only taking baby steps to good

Related Topics: Nutrition


Dr. Philip Abelson: A Legend's Scientific Journey

Date: July 1st, 2002

Nearly 80 years ago, a grade school teacher told her class: "Each of you has special potential and talents. One of your responsibilities is to find out what those are and to use them." Philip Abelson, a boy in her class, remembered those words. Now an accomplished scientist and public commentator, Dr. Abelson continues to fulfill that responsibility by exploring and influencing the world of science even as he nears his 90s. As the editor of Science magazine for 22 years, Abelson

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


New Frontiers in Battle Against Alzheimer's

Date: April 1st, 2002

New Alzheimer's research is making dramatic strides in treating one of the most common - and feared - forms of dementia. The degenerative brain disease strikes one in 10 of those over 65, and almost half of those over 85. Alzheimer's currently affects some 4 million Americans, but experts predict that number could grow to 14 million in the next 50 years unless a cure or preventive treatment is found. Research is focusing on three main areas: What causes the brain to


Demand Better Training for Your Healthcare Provider!

Date: April 1st, 2002

Americans over the age of 65 represent over one-half of physician visits annually, yet only a small percent of healthcare professionals actually have specific training to appropriately care for this population. With the number of Americans over 65 expected to double within 30 years, our healthcare system is woefully unprepared to handle the inevitable surge of geriatric patients. This serious but overlooked problem is highlighted in Medical Never-Never Land: 10 Reasons Why America is Not Ready for the Coming Age Boom,


Where We Stand on Therapeutic Cloning--And Why

Date: April 1st, 2002

The Alliance for Aging Research believes all attempts to clone a human being are dangerous, unethical and wrong at this time. We believe just as strongly that, with appropriate guidelines, U.S. scientists should have the freedom to clone stem cells in laboratory dishes in an attempt to cure serious and life-threatening diseases. The Alliance supports legislation in Congress to make it a federal offense to try to copy people using cloning technology. But we strongly oppose some other anti-cloning measures which


Florence Mahoney: A Noble Conspirator Indeed!

Date: April 1st, 2002

Florence Stephenson Mahoney has spent most of her adult years as an advocate for good health for all. Currently 102 years old, Mrs. Mahoney can proudly say that she played a key role in reshaping federal government priorities. During the three decades after World War II, Mrs. Mahoney worked tirelessly to encourage the federal government to allocate money for biomedical research. She was astonishingly successful. The legacy of her efforts today is the greatest biomedical research aggregation in the world

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Seniors and Supplements: Risks vs. Rewards

Date: February 1st, 2002

Echinacea, St. John's wort, valerian-these exotic dietary supplements are becoming household names in a society eager to maintain its youthful vigor. Seniors, too, are increasingly turning to supplements as a way to stave off deadly diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease and fight prostate cancer. But before you rush out to buy these modern marvels, consider their downside. "Just because it's labeled as a dietary supplement and a 'natural' product doesn't mean it's safe," says Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg, professor of nutrition at

Related Topics: Nutrition


Advances for the New Millennium

Date: February 1st, 2002

There is a fine line in medical research between hope and realism. Today's highly-hyped breakthrough could be tomorrow's bust. So it may seem premature to try to characterize any of the advances in research on aging since the turn of the 21st century as "bigger" or "brighter" than others. Only time will tell. However, in looking at the most promising research to have emerged in the infancy of the new millennium, there is significant progress in research, pharmaceuticals and medical technologies


20 Tips to Help Prevent Medical Errors from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

Date: February 1st, 2002

Medical errors are one of the Nation's leading causes of death and injury. A recent report by the Institute of Medicine estimates that as many as 44,000 to 98,000 people die in U.S. hospitals each year as the result of medical errors. This means that more people die from medical errors than from motor vehicle accidents, breast cancer, or AIDS. Government agencies, purchasers of group health care, and health care providers are working together to make the U.S. health care system


A Look Back to the Future

Date: February 1st, 2002

When the Alliance For Aging Research was formed fifteen years ago, the country was not focused on the impact of the aging and how the health of the Baby Boomers will affect our economy and our overall society. Thankfully, over the past fifteen years, more attention has been turned towards much needed medical information and breakthroughs for the aging community. Medical science is constantly on the threshold of dramatic, new discoveries that could bring remarkable benefits to people as they age. The

Related Topics: Aging Research


Dr. Ray Crist: Probing Nature's Secrets

Date: February 1st, 2002

Dr. Ray Crist's life has come full circle. His boyhood fascination with nature on a Pennsylvania farm eventually led to his pivotal role in the birth of the atomic age. Now, at age 101, Crist is still coaxing nature to reveal its secrets. "I'm just trying to understand the nature of things, that's all," Crist says. "A basic driving force is my curiosity." It's that overriding curiosity that prompts Crist to head for his laboratory at 7:30 every morning. He typically works

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Centenarians: The Ultimate Survivors

Date: February 1st, 2002

Living to 100 may well represent the ultimate game of "Survivor." Centenarians, as they're known, were alive at the turn of the last century, when airplanes, computers, and space travel were pure science fantasies. And yet, a century later, these centenarians are blazing new trails in science every day. An estimated 70,000 Americans have reached the century mark. These "oldest old" now represent the fastest-growing segment of our population, growing by 35 percent between 1990 and 2000. For Dr. Thomas Perls, centenarians

Related Topics: Aging Research


Exercise and Strength Training: It's Never Too Late to Start

Date: October 1st, 2001

The best medicine to combat the vagaries of old age is exercise. And it's never too late to start, says Dr. Maria Fiatarone Singh, professor of Medicine and Sports Science at the University of Sydney in Australia. Dr. Fiatarone and colleagues at Tufts University developed and tested a strength training program using weights on frail men and women in their 80s and 90s who live at the Hebrew Rehabilitation Center for Aged in Boston. Nearly all have arthritis and heart disease

Related Topics: Prevention


Alzheimer's Disease: The Cruelest Thief

Date: October 1st, 2001

Alzheimer's is the cruelest of the diseases that strike the elderly. There is no known cure for this neuro-degenerative disorder that eats away the body's command center, first stealing memory, then bodily functions, and ultimately life as it runs its course over five to 15 years. It holds five million people hostage - most of them past age 70 - and ranks 4th in cause of death for Americans. It is estimated that 10 percent of people past age 65


Medicare Non-Coverage of New Oral Cancer Treatments: A Hard Pill to Swallow

Date: October 1st, 2001

Promising new drugs are revolutionizing the treatment of cancer. But as so often happens, the federal bureaucracy has yet to catch up with scientific advances. As a result, millions of Americans may be denied potentially life-saving cancer drugs. The reason? As bizarre as it sounds, it's because some of the new the cancer treatments are in the form of pills. That's right - pills that patients would swallow in the comfort and convenience of their own homes. Under current law, Medicare will


Cellular Therapies Hold Great Promise Despite Controversy

Date: October 1st, 2001

You have all followed the news and debate about stem cells. As a reader of Living Longer and Loving It! you know that the Alliance for Aging Research is urging more research into cellular therapies in hopes of defeating Parkinson's and Alzheimer's, diabetes, cancer and other dread diseases. In addition to embryonic stem cells, there are other cell-based technologies: fetal cells transplants and cloned stem cells created by a laboratory technique called "somatic cell nuclear transfer." This is when the genetic material is stripped


Helen Thomas: Washington Press Doyenne

Date: October 1st, 2001

Presidents may come and go, but Helen Thomas is still at her post, after all these years. The dean of the White House press corps, Thomas is the unrivaled "Energizer bunny" of reporters who cover the president's every move. Ironically, her White House beat began in 1961, after John Kennedy's razor-thin victory; it has lasted all the way through the nail-biter of an election that ushered in George W. Bush. But after covering nine presidents, what still gets her juices flowing?

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


How We Age: Is It In Our Genes? An interview with Caleb Finch, PhD

Date: May 1st, 2001

The role of genetics in determining the quality and length of human life is a million-dollar question right now. Scientists are discovering bits and pieces of the puzzle, but they're still scratching their heads about how it all fits together. What exactly do we know about our genes and how we age? Is health and longevity determined more by genes or lifestyle choices? Caleb Finch, Ph.D., professor of Gerontology and Neurobiology at the University of Southern California, has been studying brain aging

Related Topics: Aging Research


Embryonic Stem Cell Research to Save the Lives of Millions

Date: May 1st, 2001

In biological terms, embryonic stem cells have a virtually unlimited future. Given the right signals, these stem cells can be coaxed to grow into any specialized cells in the human body, from brain cells to heart muscle. The politics of abortion, unfortunately, has cast considerable doubt on their future as miracle cures. Federally funded research on embryonic stem cells has been put on hold while the National Institutes of Health (NIH) reviews the legal and ethical concerns raised by a vocal


Boosting the NIH Budget Will Better Our Lives

Date: May 1st, 2001

It doesn't happen often, but when it comes to boosting funding for medical research, Republicans and Democrats have found a subject on which they all can agree. This rare bipartisan agreement makes it all the more imperative that Congress accelerate its funding of research on diseases that affect older Americans. We need only look to the graying of America's population to see why this funding is so urgently needed. Americans over age 65 use about a third of the $1.2 trillion


Dr. Robert Butler: Leading the Longevity Revolution

Date: May 1st, 2001

At 74, Dr. Robert Butler doesn't think about retiring. He's too busy mobilizing humanity for the Longevity Revolution. Robert Butler, M.D., didn't set out to become an internationally recognized leader in gerontology and geriatrics. He originally wanted to be a hematologist. But over the years, the ageist attitudes he encountered in both medical school and throughout American society assaulted his sensibilities, sparked an interest in geriatrics, and drew him into uncharted territory — namely, a career in the field of aging. Throughout

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Putting People First: It's Time to Own Your Health Destiny--No One Else Will

Date: April 1st, 2001

Dr. S. Robert Levine is a crusader. He likes to say, "Just as 'all politics is local,' all healthcare is personal." After all, who cares more about your health than you do? Levine, who heads the Progressive Policy Institute's Health Priorities Project, argues that people should be the central focus of the health care system, because each of us has differing health needs. Referring to his philosophy as 'personal health ownership,' Levine says, "Everyone experiences health and illness differently. Individuals differ not

Related Topics: Prevention


The 15-Year Forecast for Aging!

Date: April 1st, 2001

We introduced ten impressive thought leaders who gave us their hopes for the next 15 years of aging research in the Winter issue of LLLI! We have witnessed incredible research discoveries and medical breakthroughs in the last decade and a half that could fundamentally change the human experience of aging. The speed of medical science, and the enormous benefits it brings, make it important for all of us to have a clear vision of the possibilities ahead. We have added several

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Don't Let Medicare Squelch the Promise of New Medical Technology

Date: February 1st, 2001

When throat cancer forced a Pennsylvania physics professor to have his larynx removed, he thought his lecturing days were over. But a marvelous device called the UltraVoice voice synthesizer has allowed him to speak clearly and remain fully employed. In Brooklyn, New York, a breakthrough cardiovascular technology called intravascular radiation therapy is helping a woman resume her active life caring for two grandchildren. She had nearly given up hope after three angioplasties, two stents and open-heart surgery failed to keep her


A 15-Year Retrospective and Look Forward

Date: February 1st, 2001

Quantum Leap Forward in Science Leaves Us With Great Gains, Yet Still Much to Do Fifteen years ago, the study of human aging was largely an academic backwater: the field lacked sufficient funding, public support, and scientific prestige. Congress had created the National Institute on Aging (NIA) in the mid-1970s, but aging was one of the least funded and lowest priorities for federal medical research. Of the 11 federal health research institutes at the time, the aging institute ranked 10th in


The Legendary Lifetime of Senator Alan MacGregor Cranston

Date: February 1st, 2001

A Profile in Character, Courage, and Commitment Any facet of the late Alan Cranston's life would be enough to fill a profile: His career in California politics, where he virtually reinvented the state Democratic Party and was a two-term state controller. His four terms as U.S. Senator from California (1969-1993) and 7 consecutive terms as the Senate's Democratic whip. His leadership of the Global Security Institute, which he founded together with former Soviet President and Nobel Peace Prize winner Mikhail Gorbachev to advance the

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Testosterone: An Antidote to Aging?

Date: October 1st, 2000

Testosterone, the most important of the male sex hormones, has been both touted and blamed for the critical role it plays in making men men. It has been praised for building muscle, fueling a healthy libido and maintaining energy levels. It has also been faulted for making some men overly aggressive. But the level of testosterone peaks in a man's body in his 20s and gradually declines with age. Can it get too low and what happens if it does?


Decoding the Human Genome: Mapping the Future of Health and Aging

Date: October 1st, 2000

A genome is a strand of DNA with three billion chemical parts—found in the nucleus of every human cell—which serves as a blueprint for the genetic code that makes us unique human beings. The completion of this 10-year mapping effort is expected to further fuel the genetic revolution that is sweeping research labs around the world, bringing major breakthroughs in preventing and treating health problems from allergies to Alzheimer's disease. Advances predicted to come from our better understanding of human


Lost Opportunities on the Campaign Trail: Candidates Ignore Impending Senior Boom and its Dramatic Impact on Society

Date: October 1st, 2000

Something momentous is about to happen in this country. The largest generation in American history is poised to move into retirement, creating an unprecedented "senior boom." By 2030, there will be an estimated 70 million people over the age of 65, twice as many as there are today. This demographic shift will have a dramatic effect on our nation's economy and almost every social policy imaginable. Yet in this election year, the presidential candidates are squandering a golden opportunity to give


Championing Human Genome Research: We Need to Keep Urging for Increased Public Support for Research

Date: October 1st, 2000

With all the publicity surrounding the recent mapping of the human genome, it's hard to believe the project was ever less than wildly popular. However, like many other major scientific advances before it, this undertaking initially needed voices to speak out in its support. And from the beginning, the Alliance spoke. One of the first times the Alliance testified on Capitol Hill [in 1986] was before a committee urging Congress to support funding for expanding what was, at that time, a very


Dr. Jack McConnell: Transforming Health Care, His Community, and Himself

Date: October 1st, 2000

When he retired to the beach after an illustrious biomedical research career, Jack McConnell, M.D. — integral to such advances as the tuberculosis test, Tylenol, and magnetic resonance imaging — tried to be "what they call a typical retiree: play golf, eat at restaurants and travel." Easy to do in Hilton Head, S.C., a community of 30,000 that boasts more than 30 golf courses and at least twice as many restaurants. But 12,000 working poor also live in Hilton Head, and

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Think Young! Get Creative! Ten Ways to Keep Your Brain Young

Date: July 1st, 2000

Landmark results from neuroscience research are debunking yet another myth about aging - that the brain continually loses cells and naturally dims with age. On the contrary, recent studies show that if we continue to challenge our minds and stimulate our creativity, we not only feel better, we also cause our brains to sprout new branches, or dendrites. These new branches actually improve brain function and help compensate for the small loss of brain cells that comes with age. In effect, the

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Regenerative Medicine: Paving the Way for a Healthier Old Age

Date: July 1st, 2000

Over the next few decades, the new field of "regenerative medicine" promises to fundamentally alter the way diseases, especially those affected by the aging process, are approached and treated. Regenerative medicine involves research on ways to renew the body's tissues using natural signals, such as genes and proteins. According to William Haseltine, CEO and chair of Human Genome Sciences, Inc., the incredible strides that biomedical research has made over the past 30 years will be dwarfed by the coming regenerative


Taking Sides in the Great Longevity Debate

Date: July 1st, 2000

Critics of aging research are missing the point. Here is a sampling of what they are saying: A recent U.S. News & World Report article quoted Audrey Chapman, director of science and human rights at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, as saying, "It is evil to focus energy on trying to live longer than 80 years when many poor people now don't live past 40." The Rev. Richard J. Neuhaus of the Institute of Religion and Public Life criticized what he called


Will a Medicare Drug Benefit Help or Hurt?

Date: July 1st, 2000

Congress is trying to repair a 35-year-old shortcoming in the nation's most important health care program for seniors. If they succeed, people on Medicare will have help paying for prescription drugs. It may be the most important action that members of Congress take before they fold their tents and leave Washington this fall. But there are many ways to provide a Medicare drug benefit, and some may do more harm than good. Some of the proposals circling Capitol Hill come with


Ray Doty: Cartooning Into a New Century

Date: July 1st, 2000

One hundred and seventy-six books bear his name, as illustrator, writer, or both. After 54 years of freelancing, he still works more than 60 hours a week, but cartoonist Roy Doty doesn't plan on slowing down. Doty wanted to be a cartoonist since his elementary school days, but was not encouraged to follow the dream. "It was the middle of the Depression," he said, and he and his siblings "were persuaded to get some kind of job that would last forever,

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


What to Take for Hype: The Truth About the Anti-Aging Benefits of Vitamins

Date: May 1st, 2000

When it comes to taking care of our aging bodies, some things are obvious: exercise regularly, reduce fat intake, watch your cholesterol, get plenty of rest, and eat a well-balanced diet. But what exactly is a well-balanced diet? Do some vitamins and minerals really have anti-aging benefits? And if so, which ones should you be taking? Research has indicated that supplementation of some vitamins and minerals above the RDA (Recommended Dietary Allowances) can reduce the risk of age-related disease. But there

Related Topics: Nutrition / Prevention


People Who Need People: Clinical Trials

Date: May 1st, 2000

If Biomedical Science Is To Advance, Clinical Trials Researchers Need To Work With Human Subjects. Here's What You Need To Know About Participating In A Trial. Choosing to participate in a medical research study is an important and very personal decision. By participating, you can make a tremendous contribution to your own health or the health of others. But you should be clear about what you're getting into - the benefits and the risks - before you agree to anything. What Is


Prescription for Disaster

Date: May 1st, 2000

Limits On Newest And Best From The World Of Biomedicine By Robert M. Goldberg, Ph.D. Recently, I overheard a desperate young mother beg her pharmacist to call her doctor for a prescription for Diflucan for her ill daughter. Why was she begging? Because of her short-sighted health care plan. It wouldn't permit her doctor to use Diflucan, the best drug available for treating certain infections, until another, less expensive drug, was tried and failed. Left no choice, the anxious mother sought a


Rewinding the Aging Clock At Last: Here Come the Gero-Techs!

Date: May 1st, 2000

By Dan Perry It may be humankind's oldest dream - somehow to cheat the processes of aging and death. We've seen it play out time and time again as people have sought advice, even solace from various sources, many of them shamans, sorcerers and patent-medicine charlatans. Of course nothing changed. But real progress on the aging front is finally within sight. That's because of the new field of gero-tech, biotechnology being pursued by an exciting group of U.S. companies that have formed in

Related Topics: Aging Research


Natalie Davis Springharn: Of Grace & Grit

Date: May 1st, 2000

"The amazing thing about me is that I'm alive!" Natalie Davis Spingarn comments wryly. How true. Twenty-five years ago, Spingarn suffered from metastatic breast cancer. She not only lived, but she also went on to become a successful writer and advocate for cancer survivors. Her 1982 book, Hanging In There, reflected Spingarn's strong will to survive. Recently, she published The New Cancer Survivors: Living with Grace, Fighting with Spirit. It takes into account how survivors deal with some of the changes in medicine

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


A Healthy Way to Sweat Aging

Date: October 1st, 1999

Aerobic Exercise and Weight Training Offer Many Benefits If you think your softening body is an irreversible byproduct of aging, think again. A regular, long-term exercise program can produce the following list of wonders: strengthen the heart and lungs stop muscle loss and slow bone loss that begins at about age 40 and accelerates at age 50 help burn fat faster increase strength, stamina, and self-confidence improve balance lower the risk of diabetes, heart disease and osteoporosis lessen arthritis pain improve sleep What's more, women between 40 and 65 who

Related Topics: Prevention


A Shot of Hope on the Alzheimer's Front

Date: October 1st, 1999

Vaccine In Mice Study Proves Promising This is not the case of the mouse that roared, but instead the one where the mouse stayed plaque-free. Plaque is a big thing in the world of Alzheimer's research. Deposits known as amyloid plaques are found in the brain, but whether they cause the symptoms of the illness or simply signal the presence of the disease is unclear. However, scientists recently developed and administered a new vaccine to mice with promising results. Seven of nine showed


Lost Independence: A Costly Problem You Can Avoid

Date: October 1st, 1999

Imagine what it must be like to move to a nursing home. You spend your days in unfamiliar surroundings, removed from loved ones and dependent on strangers to tend to your most basic needs. Worse, losing the ability to live at home exacts a great personal financial price. The Alliance for Aging Research estimates that the total average cost of care for a person who remains independent during the year is $4,800. But should that person need to spend any


Fight for Your Independence

Date: October 1st, 1999

By Dan Perry Personal independence, the capacity to live where you wish, to do the things you want, with the people you want to be with; this is the essence of freedom that we all cherish. But with age, and with the rising risk of chronic diseases, these essential freedoms become even more precious. Functional independence can be lost so quickly. Suffer a crippling heart attack. Break a bone that won't heal. Lose the ability to see or hear clearly. Suddenly, taking


Ike Hager: Teenager at Heart

Date: October 1st, 1999

Someone forgot to tell Ike Hager that adolescence ends at age 20. The 69-year-old says that his wife regularly tells him to "stop acting like a teenager." He certainly has the energy of one...or maybe several. Besides his position as office administrator at the Alliance for Aging Research, the New Jersey native volunteers with St. Charles Catholic Elementary School and Community Health Charities of the National Capital Area. He has also amassed a collection of 340 Beanie Babies, which he plans

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Shattering the Myths of Old Age

Date: July 1st, 1999

What is more important in determining how well we age -- genetics or lifestyle choices? In their book Successful Aging, authors John W. Rowe, M.D., and Robert L. Kahn, Ph.D., share the results of a 10-year study by the MacArthur Foundation to find out how people can preserve and enhance their mental and physical health in later life. The research shows that the influence of genetics shrinks proportionately as we get older, while social and physical habits become more important to


Can We Live Longer by Eating Fewer Calories?

Date: July 1st, 1999

The jury is still out on whether caloric restriction can prolong human life or prevent age-related diseases, but the results of recent studies with rodents and rhesus monkeys are moving us closer to a verdict. Richard Weindruch, Ph.D., professor of medicine at University of Wisconsin-Madison and one of the nation's top caloric restriction researchers, shares some thoughts about this promising area of research. Q: Is caloric restriction a new idea? A: We have known for 60 years that caloric restriction, done without skimping

Related Topics: Nutrition


Where Are All the Geriatricians? We Need Them Now!

Date: July 1st, 1999

Despite more than 20 years of clear warnings from some of the most prestigious health policy and medical groups in the country, America is facing a severe shortage of health care professionals trained to manage the special health care needs of older people. Currently there are about 8,800 doctors certified in geriatric medicine. That's up from 6,740 three years ago, but falls far short of the 20,000 that the Alliance for Aging Research estimates are needed now for today's population of


Shortage of Geriatricians: A Quiet by Critical Health Care Crisis

Date: July 1st, 1999

Ever wonder whether the doctor treating your parent, older relative or friend, or you, if you happen to be over 65, has any special training in treating older people? The chances are pretty good they don't. Despite the achievements of modern medicine, too many health professionals misdiagnose, overlook, or dismiss illnesses in older people as the "normal process of aging." Aside from the suffering this ignorance causes patients, it also burdens society with tremendous costs--such as the $70 billion in


Thomas L. "Lou" Letizia: The Rookie

Date: July 1st, 1999

Thomas L. "Lou" Letizia at 61 years old was a police officer in El Portal, Fla. He's was not a veteran poised for retirement, though - Letizia was a rookie. In January of that year he graduated with 37 others from the police academy at the Miami-Dade Community College's School of Justice, becoming one of the oldest cadets to do so. He graduated in the top 10 percent of his class, and won the men's physical fitness award for doing 70

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Seven "Secrets" to Healthy Aging

Date: May 1st, 1999

1 Develop a "social portfolio" A social portolio is like a financial portfolio. You need to (1) diversify your assets (2) have a safety net (3) start early. Your assets are the diverse interests and relationships you develop and draw upon over your lifetime. The safety net is the protection you develop when you cultivate a healthy range of interests that include group and individual activities that require high energy/high mobility as well as low energy/low mobility. The earlier you take these

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Stem Cells, Small in Size, Big in Hope

Date: May 1st, 1999

Imagine a world without debilitating costly diseases such as Parkinson's, heart disease and diabetes. It may be possible because of research into human embryonic stem cells. These tiny biological units pack a very big punch. They have unlimited potential to divide, retain the characteristics of "young" cells and become almost any tissue in the body. Recently, researchers announced they had successfully cultivated human embryonic stem cells. Conceivably, they could "direct" them to replace diseased cells and offset the medical and financial


Underfunding of Medical Research Threatens Your Future Health

Date: May 1st, 1999

Although medical research is a major avenue to healthy aging, it is seriously under-funded. The Clinton Administration's budget for next year includes only a 1.4 percent increase in the budget for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), America's premier federal agency for medical research. That represents the smallest increase in the NIH budget this decade. Yet this is happening when substantial funding increases are needed most. For consider these facts: Next year, one-eighth of the American population will be over 65. But


Be Part of a New Force for Healthy Aging

Date: May 1st, 1999

Find out your chances of living to 100 on the latest addition to the Alliance home page, The Living to 100 Life Expectancy Calculator© . It would be a mistake to think that life in your 70s, 80s, 90s, and beyond will resemble aging in your grandparents' generation. Discoveries in genetics and medicine, plus many changes in society are occurring at great speed and in ways that are likely to redefine health, vitality, and independence for older Americans. Scientists say many

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Evelyn Nef: This Traveler Knows No Bounds

Date: May 1st, 1999

Evelyn Nef decided to give herself a flat stomach for her 80th birthday. So she signed up with a personal trainer. Five years later, Evelyn still exercises regularly. Unusual for most people, perhaps, but Evelyn Nef is not most people. In the 1940s and '50s, she went on polar expeditions with her second husband, noted explorer Viljhalmur Stefannson, wrote three books about the Arctic and freelanced for the New York Times. At Dartmouth College, whose Baker Library holds the Stefannson Collection,

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


Take a Gene Tweak and Call Me in the Morning

Date: March 1st, 1999

Government genetic research may completely transform medicine You want cutting edge? Try this: in the health care world of tomorrow, simple blood tests accurately forecast a person's life long predisposition to disease. Doctors are able to custom fit medicines to a person's genes, eliminating the chances that drug treatments will prove dangerous or ineffective. It will also be possible to substitute healthy genes for defective ones, a procedure that spares people the horrible suffering and devastating expense of catastrophic illness. All of


One Serving of Youth Please! Or, How Do You Eat Your Way to Healthy Aging?

Date: February 1st, 1999

Did you know you can eat your way to healthy aging? Living Longer and Loving It! recently consulted leading nutritionist Dr. Jeffrey Blumberg to develop a list of foods you can start eating now to put yourself on the road to healthy aging. Below, Dr. Blumberg answers questions you may be asking yourself about how to improve your chances for longevity and health. Dr. Blumberg, your research focuses heavily on antioxidants. What's the connection between them and the aging process? Dietary antioxidants,

Related Topics: Nutrition


Taking Aging (Or Not) On the Campaign Trail

Date: February 1st, 1999

The positions of Presidential candidates on improving health care runs from the disappointing to the downright scary. We haven't heard much from the Republicans. Democrats Al Gore and Bill Bradley both propose government-sponsored programs to cover more Americans -- but still not all -- who currently lack health insurance. The cost estimates of their proposals run as high as $1 trillion, enough to more than wipe out the national budget surplus. To finance such plans, Washington would have to ration health


From "Come On, Baby, Light My Fire," to "Come On, Baby, Go To Sleep"

Date: February 1st, 1999

Let's Be Grandparents On Our Own Terms By Dan Perry It doesn't seem possible that a guy who knows most of the lyrics of Jim Morrison and The Doors can wake up one day to find he is someone's grandfather. It may be jarring, but grandparenthood is the next happening thing for Baby Boomers. Trust me on this. When I first imagined my daughter giving birth, I was immediately grateful for medical advances. Modern obstetrics has made childbirth very safe. The percentage of women who


Ruth Ittner: Blazing Trails for 80 Years

Date: February 1st, 1999

Ruth Ittner was six weeks old when she went on her first hike. It must have made an impression. Eighty-two years later, Ruth lives in Washington state, where she continues to coordinate the transformation of an abandoned stretch of railway into the Iron Goat Trail. Eight and one half miles long, the route offers handicapped access wherever possible. "Without her, that trail never would have happened," according to Sheridan Botts, a volunteer and Living Longer reader who nominated Ruth for Living Legend

Related Topics: Healthy Aging


30 Years of Putting Science in the Spotlight

For 30 years, the Alliance has been focused on realizing its mission: accelerating the pace of scientific discoveries and their application to vastly improve the universal human experience of aging and health. In this issue of Science in the Spotlight, we take you back over these 30 years to highlight the role we played in bringing awareness to vital scientific research and discoveries that changed—and continue to change—the way we think about medicine, health, and the future of the human race. The