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Under Treatment of a Treatable Disease: T.A.K.E. on Glaucoma

Date: May 1st, 2012

An estimated 2.3 million Americans are living with glaucoma and because it is a disease of aging, that number is expected to climb during this decade—surpassing 3.3 million by 2020—a 50% increase. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that are associated with elevated eye pressure that can damage the optic nerve and cause vision loss. That vision loss can usually be prevented with early detection and proper treatment and disease management, yet glaucoma continues to be one of the


Treatments for Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Going Head to Head

Date: May 1st, 2011

Exciting treatments make slowing and even restoring vision loss in wet age-related macular degeneration (wAMD) patients a reality. Two of the most frequently used treatments are currently in the spotlight as they go head-to-head in clinical trials comparing their effectiveness, and to some extent, exploring their costs. The Anti-VEGF Treatments AMD is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in Americans age 60 and over. This progressive eye disease involves the breakdown of the macula—the light-sensing portion of the retina—resulting in the


The Eyes Have It

Date: October 1st, 2007

Every day, our eyes enable us to respond to the smiles on our children’s faces, perform our daily tasks at work, watch our paths for obstacles, and even drive wherever we need to go. Unfortunately, for many of us aging can make these everyday moments more difficult. Diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and cataracts can gradually rob us of a precious way that we interact with the world. As seeing becomes more of a strain, we


Progress in Fighting Eye Disease

Date: October 1st, 2007

The human eye is a complex marvel of biology. Specialized cells take in light, parse it into electrical signals, and transmit them to the part of the brain that reassembles the information into images, motion, color, and depth. With so many dedicated cells working together in such an intricate system, it is easy to see why the eye is susceptible to disease. Scientists hope that by understanding how that system works and what causes it to fail, we will be able

Related Topics: Vision Loss


The High Cost of Eye Disease

Date: October 1st, 2007

As our population ages, the impact of eye disease on our economy will continue to grow, yet new research and treatments hold great promise to blunt the cost and improve patients’ lives. Eye disease has a disproportionate impact on older Americans. Aging makes us more susceptible to certain eye diseases, including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and cataracts. Close to 10 million Americans have some form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and every year, an additional 200,000 develop the disease.

Related Topics: Vision Loss


The Eyes Have It

Date: February 1st, 2005

Stem cells could hold the key to stopping and even reversing the blinding effects of aging, according to recent research. Many scientists have long felt that embryonic stem cells could halt the progression of or even cure a number of degenerative diseases. Their hope has been that researchers could coax stem cells to grow into healthy cells of any type - cells that doctors could then use to replace damaged cells in patients affected by disease. Eye research is one of

Related Topics: Vision Loss


Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Date: July 1st, 2003

The eyes are the first to go, the old adage says. And that means more than simply struggling to read the fine print as we grow older. Aging increases the risk of macular degeneration, the leading cause of vision loss in older Americans. Age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, causes sight loss in the central field of vision, although peripheral vision remains intact. Central vision is what enables us to read, drive a car, recognize faces, and other activities that call for

Related Topics: Vision Loss