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The Alliance Celebrated 30 Years of Advancing Science

Date: December 13th, 2016

The Alliance holds the Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner to bring together outstanding people who help to advance the science of aging. This year’s dinner was particularly special because it marked 30 years since the Alliance was founded. On September 29, the Alliance’s peers and supporters gathered to acknowledge the amazing people who devote their time to bringing aging issues to the forefront. The Alliance was pleased to recognize the Honorable Bill Cassidy, Republican senator from Louisiana, the Honorable Maxine Waters,

Related Topics: Aging Research


News-At-A-Glance

Date: December 13th, 2016

President Obama signed the 21st Century Cures Act into law on December 13, 2016. The Cures Act will hasten how drugs and medical devices are reviewed and authorized by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The Alliance recently released a statement on the Cures Act. Read it here.    Last month, the ACT-AD (Accelerate Cures/Treatments for Alzheimer's Disease) Coalition hosted its Ninth Annual FDA/Alzheimer's Disease Allies Meeting to discuss the current state of Alzheimer's disease treatment development. You can find a full recap


30 Years of Putting Science in the Spotlight

Date: August 2nd, 2016

For 30 years, the Alliance has been focused on realizing its mission: accelerating the pace of scientific discoveries and their application to vastly improve the universal human experience of aging and health. In this issue of Science in the Spotlight, we take you back over those 30 years to highlight the role we've played in bringing awareness to vital scientific research and discoveries that changed—and continue to change—the way we think about medicine, health, and the future of the human race. The Alliance

Related Topics: Aging Research


Celebrating 30 Years of Advancing Science and Enhancing Lives

Date: August 1st, 2016

This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Alliance for Aging Research. Since our creation in 1986, our story has been unfolding as we’ve worked to advance science and enhance lives. Our founder, Dan Perry, describes our story this way:  “It’s a story of how a small group of people set out to square the curve of human aging.  We saw the potential to strengthen human bodies and minds as we age by supporting and energizing scientists who are probing the

Related Topics: Aging Research


Q & A with Alliance President and CEO Sue Peschin

Date: July 31st, 2016

In this edition of Living Longer & Loving It, we speak to Sue Peschin, MHS, the Alliance’s president and CEO, about the organization’s 30th anniversary. Sue offered her thoughts on the milestone and her vision for what she would like the Alliance to achieve moving forward. LLLI: What thoughts come to mind when you think about the Alliance’s 30-year anniversary? It’s been a privilege for me to serve as the leader of an organization that has accomplished so much over the last 30 years. I’m


News-At-A-Glance

Date: March 11th, 2016

    Alliance Releases Its Impact Report Our 2015 Impact Report is now available!  You can check it out here.    The President’s Budget: Read the Numbers, Not the Headlines The Obama administration’s FY 2017 vision for the federal government does not include continuing increases for America’s biomedical research community. The Alliance's Ryne Carney shares more.   Seniors Decide Event Spotlights Issues Affecting Older Adults On Wednesday, February 17, the Leadership Council of Aging Organizations hosted the Seniors Decide 2016 forum to discuss the policies and issues that matter most to older adults. The event provided a

Related Topics: Aging Research


Alliance Celebrates 30 Years with 30-Week Campaign

Date: March 8th, 2016

In 1986 the Alliance for Aging Research launched in Washington, D.C.  Our mission? To advance the science of aging and health in order to help people live longer, healthier lives.  In the mid-‘80s, it became apparent to government officials as well as health experts that the aging of the U.S. population would pose an unsustainable demand for health care resources. That was unless strategies for keeping older Americans healthy and vital could be discovered through medical research.  So, Dan Perry, a senior staff member

Related Topics: Aging Research


News-At-A-Glance

Date: December 8th, 2015

National Geographic Channel Special on Aging On November 29 the National Geographic Channel debuted an important special, "The Age of Aging." Directed by Ron Howard, it highlighted the pioneering research dedicated to extending our healthy years of life, or healthspan.  Also check out this Q & A with Dr. Steven N. Austad, one of the experts who appeared in the special.   Antibiotic Resistance and HAIs The Alliance’s president and CEO Sue Peschin, MHS, published a blog post about the increasing danger of healthcare-associated infections to older adults. She

Related Topics: Aging Research


Alliance Annual Dinner Highlights Caregivers, Alzheimer’s Research

Date: December 7th, 2015

The Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner is a time-honored tradition at the Alliance for Aging Research. Over the years, the dinner has brought to the stage of the historic Willard Hotel notable government officials such as Senators John Glenn and Edward Kennedy, extraordinary innovators like Jay Walker and Martha Stewart, and heads of critical health agencies that include the FDA, NIH, CMS, and even NASA. On September 29, 2015, the Alliance continued the tradition of celebrating the cause of aging research and honoring


New Video Demonstrates Why Research Matters

Date: December 6th, 2015

In September the Alliance debuted a new video on the impact of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) at the Rally for Medical Research in Washington, D.C.   It features real people and their family caregivers whose lives were impacted by NIH research. This included people who were diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, heart failure, cancer, stroke, dysautonomia, and hydrocephalus. Some of these diseases may be familiar to you, while others may not. No matter what, conditions like these impact your friends, family, and colleagues every day. Without


30 Years in the Making

Date: April 2nd, 2015

In the mid-1980s, leading members of the U.S. Congress became aware that an aging American populace would pose an unsustainable demand on health care resources. This was unless strategies to keep this population healthy could be developed through medical and behavioral research. Members from both sides of the aisle came to the same conclusion: Aging research offered the greatest promise for both moderating health care costs and improving the lives of older Americans. At the time, an organization with the clout needed to


News-At-A-Glance

Date: April 2nd, 2015

Alliance Dinner Is September 29 The Alliance’s 22nd Annual Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner will be held on September 29, 2015, in Washington, D.C. We’ll be updating our website throughout the upcoming months, so please check back often for more info.   New Annual Report Now Available We have released our Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2014. It gives a comprehensive overview of everything we’ve done in the past fiscal year to advance the cause of aging research, further research into Alzheimer’s and sarcopenia, and educate on


Alliance Founder Dan Perry Retires

Date: March 30th, 2015

The founder of the Alliance for Aging Research Dan Perry has announced his retirement with the organization. Perry founded the organization in 1986 and served as its president and CEO until 2014 when Sue Peschin, MHS, assumed the role. During Perry’s tenure, the Alliance became a force in advancing the science of aging and health, advocating for public policies to promote aging research and higher quality of life for older Americans, and creating health education materials on conditions and topics affecting


Are Longer Lives a Good Thing?

Date: November 25th, 2014

Alliance founder Dan Perry joined the dean of the Mailman School of Public Health Linda P. Fried at a town hall event on October 22 at Columbia University in New York City to address the topic of "The New Age of Aging: Are Longer Lives a Good Thing?" Moderated by journalist and filmmaker Perri Peltz, Perry and Fried discussed the effects of aging on society, how it is perceived today, and its future. They also took questions from the live audience as well as those who were watching online via Livestream.     The talk


News-At-A-Glance

Date: November 25th, 2014

This Giving Season Consider the Alliance As we enter the holiday season, we also enter that time of the year when giving is at its peak. As you consider your own end of year giving, we wanted to offer a couple of ways you can give back to the Alliance.  The first is through #GivingTuesday. You know about Black Friday and Cyber Monday, but do you know about #GivingTuesday? This is a global day dedicated to giving back to worthy causes. #GivingTuesday offers

Related Topics: Aging Research


Q & A with President and CEO Sue Peschin

Date: July 16th, 2014

Sue Peschin was recently named as president and CEO of the Alliance for Aging Research, taking over for Founder Dan Perry. This was a historic moment in the history of our organization. We sat down with Sue to get her thoughts on her position and her vision for the future of the Alliance. LLLI: You are the second president and CEO in the almost 30-year history of the Alliance. What are your initial thoughts on succeeding Dan Perry? Sue: It is an honor for me


News At-A-Glance

Date: July 16th, 2014

The Alliance's 2014 Bipartisan Congressional Awards Dinner is fast approaching. This year's event will be held September 30, 2014, at the Willard InterContinental Hotel in Washington, D.C. The dinner celebrates advances in aging research and honors individuals for their immense contributions. Among this year's honorees include Jay Walker of TEDMED, U.S. Senator Bill Nelson of Florida and the Honorable Mitch Daniels, president of Purdue University. We are offering a limited amount of tickets to the dinner, so if you would like


The Graying of the Population: Silver Tsunami or Silver Lining?

Date: July 16th, 2014

A major initiative of the Alliance for Aging Research is to increase the amount of federal funding to support research that extends a person’s healthy years of life. We see this as one of the most effective strategies to reduce the lengthy, painful period of disease and disability many people face as they grow older. When the Alliance goes to Capitol Hill each year to make our case for increasing the budget for dedicated research that may lead to interventions that


New Film Looks into the Promise of Aging Research

Date: July 16th, 2014

The Alliance's Healthspan Campaign will release a new film this summer called The Healthspan Imperative. Narrated by author and television personality Martha Stewart, this film focuses on a very timely issue: the aging of the U.S. population and the ruinous effect it could have on our economy and way of life. But the film isn't just about a hopeless future, it's about the hope offered through the promise of aging research.  Featuring exclusive interviews with leading lights in the field of gerontology, The Healthspan Imperative


Geroscience: The Science of Aging

Date: October 10th, 2013

While the study of the science behind aging is not new, it has only recently become organized and recognized enough to warrant its own name—geroscience. Geroscience is a field that aims to understand the relationship between aging and age-related disease. Geroscientists and their supporters believe that this relationship is the key to finding new ways to prevent, slow, and cure the diseases that disproportionately impact us as we grow older. Scientists now generally agree that aging—and the disease and dysfunction


Harnessing Technology & Science: Researchers Collaborate to Build an Unprecedented Resource

Date: October 1st, 2012

Recognizing both the power of technology and the priceless health information contained in the human genome, Kaiser Permanente and the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), have formed a groundbreaking collaboration in order to produce one of the largest biobanks in the world. A biobank is a repository—or storage space—for biological samples to be used in research. They give researchers access to data (like genetics and disease information) and samples (like blood and saliva) from large numbers of people. Those data

Related Topics: Aging Research


Do We Have to Age the Way We Age? Dan Perry Takes This Question to the TEDMED Stage

Date: October 1st, 2012

TEDMED is most known for its annual conference--a medical spin-off from the TED conference where people come to share big ideas and foster new ones. But TEDMED is also a community of people who are all passionate about the future of health and medicine, but in amazingly different ways. At the TEDMED conference, leaders from countless backgrounds come together to share and explore. According to the TEDMED organizers, it’s the “only place where a Nobel Prize winning neurobiologist has a conversation


The Common Denominator: The Key to Extending Healthspan

Date: May 1st, 2012

Most people know what lifespan is—the average length of life of a species, often measured within a sub-population like “Americans” or “women.” Essentially—how long we live. But few have even heard of healthspan. Dictionary.com defines it as the “period of one’s life during which one is generally healthy and free from serious disease.” Essentially—how long we live in good health. But a search of many of the other leading on-line dictionaries for healthspan, including Merriam-Webster and The Free Dictionary, returned “word


Bracing for the Silver Tsunami: Aging Research May Save Lives and Money

Date: May 1st, 2011

Investigators supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) are on the cusp of research breakthroughs that could enhance their abilities to predict and intervene earlier in the processes of many age-related chronic diseases. In particular, rapid progress in recent years in advancing understanding of the aging process has led to considerable knowledge of how scientists might increase human health in later life by opposing the primary risk factor for most disease of aging—aging itself. If realized, these advances would usher


Super Agers: Sharing Their Secrets

Date: May 1st, 2011

A new website from Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University—SuperAgers.com—highlights the findings from more than a decade of aging research and features some of the centenarians that shared their secrets, and their DNA, for this seminal project. SuperAgers.com helps us understand the current state of aging science, the genetics of aging, and the tremendous potential for useful aging interventions. It also lets us hear the personal stories of individuals who are living longer and loving it. Their Inspiring Stories More than


What is Aging Research? Defining the Field

Date: July 1st, 2009

How exactly does one define aging research? It turns out that finding agreement on a single definition is not as easy as it seems. If you do an Internet search for the terms “aging research” you’ll get a feel for just how confusing it can get. Your search should turn up close to 9.5 million results—including organizations, articles, speeches, blog posts, and experts. You will find that many of these sources have a different idea of what exactly aging research is—although

Related Topics: Aging Research


Long Living in the Blue Zones

Date: June 1st, 2009

You’ve probably heard that Americans are living longer than ever—in fact the average baby born today can expect to live to be 78 years old. But did you know there are close to 50 other countries with even longer life expectancies? Scientists all over the world have spent countless hours studying the life expectancy differences between countries, cultures, and races. They have searched for answers in their genes, their diets, their exercise routines, their healthcare access, and even their tendencies to


Election 2008: Candidates Paying Too Little Attention to the Approaching Silver Tsunami

Date: October 1st, 2008

The 2008 presidential election is upon us and health care reform is at the top of both candidates’ agendas. Democratic Nominee Senator Barack Obama and Republican Nominee Senator John McCain have both offered detailed plans to fix our ailing health care system. While their plans have very little in common, they both offer solutions to lower skyrocketing health care costs and make health insurance more affordable for more people. Unfortunately, both plans pay too little attention to the approaching silver tsunami. The


Sirtuins, Famine, and the Fountain of Youth

Date: October 1st, 2008

There’s been a lot of buzz lately about a “red wine” drug that could be a fountain of youth—combating the effects of aging and age-related disease. The drug, along with other promising breakthroughs, is being developed by Sirtris Pharmaceuticals—a company recently purchased by drug giant GlaxoSmithKline. The drug is based on resveratrol, a chemical found in red wine that activates important sirtuin genes and has extended healthy life in animal studies. The Sirtuin Family Sirtuins are genes found in most organisms—from bacteria


Investing in the Longevity Dividend

Date: October 1st, 2008

Life expectancy has reached an all-time high, and with that comes an increased risk of chronic diseases and other health conditions. Chronic diseases account for nearly three-fourths of the more than $2 trillion the U.S. annually spends on health care. If those numbers sound daunting, consider that costs will skyrocket in January 2011 when 78 million Americans begin to enroll in Medicare. The new president may choose to revamp health care when he takes office, but without breakthroughs in research,

Related Topics: Aging Research


Preparing for the Silver Tsunami

Date: July 1st, 2006

Whenever you open a newspaper or magazine these days, you’re likely to find an article exhorting baby boomers to plan for retirement—telling them to save more, to learn about portfolio planning, and to project their financial needs for decades to come. This focus on financial health may improve the state of boomers’ wallets, but it ignores the single greatest issue that will affect their quality of life in retirement: the high probability of chronic disease. The Alliance for Aging Research reports

Related Topics: Aging Research


Caught in the Act of Leading

Date: February 1st, 2005

Scientists searching for a way to delay the aging process may have found it in an intervention that many Americans battle with again and again—cutting calories. When used as a lifestyle choice, calorie restriction yields a significantly healthier and prolonged life. Calorie restriction (CR)—under nutrition without malnutrition—is the only intervention that has been documented in laboratory animals to increase the average life span, or the average number of years an animal is expected to live, and maximum life span—the maximum number

Related Topics: Aging Research


The Importance of Aging Research

Date: October 1st, 2004

Consider this: In the year 1902, if it had been somehow possible to gather together everyone in America who had reached the age of 85 or older, that population would have scarcely made up a single Zip Code in today's Sun Belt. Today, the numbers of people age 85 and above, about 5 million Americans, will increase four-fold with the aging of the Baby Boom. People aged 100 or more - currently some 70,000 - will increase 10 times before

Related Topics: Aging Research


Here's to a Long, Long Life with Health and Happiness Too

Date: July 1st, 2004

If you could swallow a little yellow pill and live to be 120 years old, would you? Would your good health hold out that long? Would your retirement savings last for 50 years? Could society sustain an explosion of "super seniors"? The benefits and consequences of scientific breakthroughs in life extension were debated at a medical conference in Newark, NJ in April entitled, "Creating Very Old People: Individual Blessing? Or Societal Disaster?" While there is no magic bullet, no little yellow

Related Topics: Aging Research


Do You Know Your Life Expectancy?

Date: April 1st, 2004

For those of you familiar with the Alliance for Aging Research website, you may have already experienced our most popular interactive feature…the "Living to 100" quiz, a tool that calculates your longevity potential. For veterans of the quiz and for new visitors, we have good news! Based upon the latest research on centenarians, the calculator has been updated in hopes of helping still more people be at least centenarian-like and live well into their older years spending the majority of


All Roads Lead to...Sardinia!?

Date: April 1st, 2004

A drug now in clinical trials for treatment of type 2 diabetes could eventually be used to promote longevity by treating or preventing major age-related diseases. Scientists studying the drug fluasterone, a synthetic steroid, have so far shown that the drug lowers blood triglyceride levels, which are abnormally high in those with diabetes. They are now focusing on the fundamental question of whether it lowers blood glucose levels, and hope to have the drug on the market within a few years. But


Anti-Aging: Hype v. Reality

Date: February 1st, 2004

Very real remedies that will stop or reverse the aging process may ultimately be discovered, but for now, save your money to spend on a health club membership. That's the consensus among leading scientists researching the subject of aging. They say that there is no "cure" for aging-yet. However, there is still plenty you can do to stay as healthy and active as possible well into your later years. Untested treatments may be ineffective or even dangerous Dr. Jay Olshansky is a professor

Related Topics: Aging Research


The Secret Genes of Centenarians

Date: February 1st, 2004

If you have lived beyond the age of 100, countless people may ask you for your secret to long life. The truth is you probably haven't a clue, but you may theorize that it has been a result of your clean living, or even your occasional indulgences. Researchers are asking the question in scientific studies of centenarians because they think you really do have a secret. And it may have to do with your genes. So if your answer was something

Related Topics: Aging Research


Is Red Wine Flowing From the Fountain of Youth?

Date: October 1st, 2003

In the search for ways to lengthen the human lifespan and extend good health further into old age, scientists had until now found only one program that demonstrated real promise: severe calorie restriction. However, researchers at Harvard have touched upon a discovery that Americans might find a great deal more palatable. Resveratrol, a compound found most abundantly in red wine, has been shown to stimulate an anti-aging enzyme active within living cells. This enzyme protects cells from stresses that would ordinarily

Related Topics: Aging Research


Advancing Quantity and Quality of Life

Date: October 1st, 2003

In the August 12th issue of the New York Times, writer Nicholas Kristof editorialized on what he sees as the ambiguous, and often rogue nature of aging research. In his article, he gave readers the unfortunate impression that researchers on aging are careening along on a dangerous road to human immortality. The Alliance for Aging Research felt compelled to post our reaction to this column. In fact, America's aging researchers are targeted on much more immediate targets than human immortality: curing

Related Topics: Aging Research


The Long and Short of It: The Age Link to Telomeres

Date: April 1st, 2003

The tiny "caps" that keep our chromosomes from fusing together are also providing clues that could eventually lead to the achievement of one our nation's most important public health goals: extending good health well into old age. These caps are called telomeres, and they're at the center of much of the current research into the aging process. A study recently published in science journal The Lancet links the lengths of telomeres with rate of survival among people over 60, the first study to

Related Topics: Aging Research


Restricting Your Diet, Testing Your Willpower

Date: October 1st, 2002

Want to live longer? Just eat less -- a lot less. Some say that cutting calories may well be the key to longer life that researchers have been seeking for generations. Caloric Restriction, or "CR," as it's known, is by no means a new theory. For some 60 years, scientists have proven repeatedly that feeding lab animals about one-third fewer calories than normal was a sure-fire way of extending their lifespan. The technique worked consistently, whether the animals were worms or fruit flies,

Related Topics: Aging Research


Science Got Us Into This Mess, and Science Will Get Us Out

Date: October 1st, 2002

One hundred years ago, when life expectancy for a newborn in the United States was less than 50 years, there wasn't a lot of worry over how to care for massive numbers of older Americans. Back when only one of every 25 Americans reached the age of 65 - and 65 was considered old! - U.S. politics didn't give much attention to something called the "Graying of America." Words like "geriatrics" and "Alzheimer's Disease" hadn't even entered our vocabulary. To appreciate why population

Related Topics: Aging Research


A Look Back to the Future

Date: February 1st, 2002

When the Alliance For Aging Research was formed fifteen years ago, the country was not focused on the impact of the aging and how the health of the Baby Boomers will affect our economy and our overall society. Thankfully, over the past fifteen years, more attention has been turned towards much needed medical information and breakthroughs for the aging community. Medical science is constantly on the threshold of dramatic, new discoveries that could bring remarkable benefits to people as they age. The

Related Topics: Aging Research


Centenarians: The Ultimate Survivors

Date: February 1st, 2002

Living to 100 may well represent the ultimate game of "Survivor." Centenarians, as they're known, were alive at the turn of the last century, when airplanes, computers, and space travel were pure science fantasies. And yet, a century later, these centenarians are blazing new trails in science every day. An estimated 70,000 Americans have reached the century mark. These "oldest old" now represent the fastest-growing segment of our population, growing by 35 percent between 1990 and 2000. For Dr. Thomas Perls, centenarians

Related Topics: Aging Research


How We Age: Is It In Our Genes? An interview with Caleb Finch, PhD

Date: May 1st, 2001

The role of genetics in determining the quality and length of human life is a million-dollar question right now. Scientists are discovering bits and pieces of the puzzle, but they're still scratching their heads about how it all fits together. What exactly do we know about our genes and how we age? Is health and longevity determined more by genes or lifestyle choices? Caleb Finch, Ph.D., professor of Gerontology and Neurobiology at the University of Southern California, has been studying brain aging

Related Topics: Aging Research


Testosterone: An Antidote to Aging?

Date: October 1st, 2000

Testosterone, the most important of the male sex hormones, has been both touted and blamed for the critical role it plays in making men men. It has been praised for building muscle, fueling a healthy libido and maintaining energy levels. It has also been faulted for making some men overly aggressive. But the level of testosterone peaks in a man's body in his 20s and gradually declines with age. Can it get too low and what happens if it does?


Rewinding the Aging Clock At Last: Here Come the Gero-Techs!

Date: May 1st, 2000

By Dan Perry It may be humankind's oldest dream - somehow to cheat the processes of aging and death. We've seen it play out time and time again as people have sought advice, even solace from various sources, many of them shamans, sorcerers and patent-medicine charlatans. Of course nothing changed. But real progress on the aging front is finally within sight. That's because of the new field of gero-tech, biotechnology being pursued by an exciting group of U.S. companies that have formed in

Related Topics: Aging Research