Publications

This page features brochures, newsletters, white papers, videos, and other resources devoted to the latest scholarship in aging research, age-related diseases and conditions, and living healthier, longer. Many publications are also available in hard copy

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Featured Publication


Pocket Film
Malnutrition in Older Adults: A Hidden Epidemic

Date: May 9th, 2016

As many as 1 in 2 older adults are at risk for malnutrition.  And it doesn't just happen to seniors who suffer from hunger, or who don't have access to healthy food.  This pocket film introduces viewers to malnutrition and includes tips on identifying, treating, and preventing this serious condition.




Pocket Film

MALNUTRICIÓN Una epidemia oculta entre los adultos de mayor edad

Date: May 9th, 2016

La malnutrición no sólo se da en los mayores que sufren hambre o que no tienen acceso a comida saludable. Le puede suceder también a adultos con enfermedades crónicas porque corren más riesgo de sufrir malnutrición. Enfermedades como el cáncer, la diabetes, el Alzhéimer y otras dolencias, pueden tener impacto sobre el apetito, haciendo que sea difícil comer, que haya cambios en el metabolismo y que conlleve restricciones en la dieta. Este corto informa sobre quién puede correr riesgo de caer en la malnutrición, el debilitante impacto que tiene en adultos mayores, ofrece información para identificar la enfermedad y cómo puede tratarse y prevenirse. Este film también está disponible en español. 



Public Comments

FY17 ACT-AD FDA Appropriations Request Letter

Author: Cynthia Bens

Date: March 17th, 2016

Letter to the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies urging the Subcommittee to prioritize the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) during Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 by increasing the agency's appropriated funding by $120 million. 




Pocket Film

Nutrition for a Healthy Life

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: March 7th, 2016

Constant exposure to our environment, the things we eat, and stresses from both inside and outside our bodies all cause us to age over time. This film explores those biological processes of aging, how we can maintain health throughout our lives with healthy lifestyles, and how scientists are learning more about the specific nutrients that can positively impact health. This film is the first in a series produced in partnership with Mars Center for Cocoa Health Science.  Learn more here.

 

Related Topics: Nutrition



Pocket Film

Healthy Aging with Nutrition

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: March 7th, 2016

A well-balanced diet full of essential nutrients can help support a healthy life. However, people with deficiencies, certain diseases and conditions, or with evolving nutritional needs at different stages of life may consider dietary supplements to add missing nutrients to their diets. Supplements are not regulated as strictly as drugs by the FDA, and headlines on nutritional recommendations seem to change from day to day. Watch this film for tips on a healthy diet, how to safely turn to supplements, and how to be a well-educated consumer. This film is the second in a series produced in partnership with Mars Center for Cocoa Health Science.  Learn more here.



Pocket Film

Heart Healthy Aging with Nutrition

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: March 7th, 2016

Like everything else in our bodies, the cardiovascular (CV) system goes through the aging process. We do know that there are things we can do, however, to positively impact our cardiovascular health. Watch this film to learn more about the aging of our CV system, research on bioactive compounds and how they may help maintain heart health, and a look at how cocoa flavanol supports healthy blood flow.   This film is the third in a series produced in partnership with Mars Center for Cocoa Health Science.  Learn more here.



Public Comments

Comments on NHLBI Draft Strategic Research Priorities

Author: Afib Optimal Treatment Taskforce

Date: March 7th, 2016

Letter to the Office of Science Policy, Engagement, Education, and Communications (OSPEEC) at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) urging the Institute to include the Afib Optimal Treatment Task Force's critical challenge of developing an effective integrated bleeding risk assessment tool as part of the NHLBI's final Strategic Research Priorities. 





Public Comments

S-FAR's PATH Act Letter

Author: S-FAR

Date: February 23rd, 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research signed onto the U.S. Stakeholder Forum for Antibiotic Resistance (S-FAR) sign-on letter for the Senate HELP Committee, supporting S.185, the Promise for Antibiotics and Therapeutics for Health (PATH) Act. 



Public Comments

Coalition for Health Funding Letter

Author: Coalition for Health Funding

Date: February 22nd, 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a Coalition for Health Funding letter in support of increasing the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education and related agencies appropriations subcommittee, to increase the 302(b) allocations for the agencies under the subcommittee's jurisdiction. 



Pocket Film

Safe Medicine Disposal

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: February 8th, 2016

An estimated 40% of medications go unused, but what do you do with medications that you no longer want or need? This film gives a simple step-by-step guide on how to dispose of over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription medications in a way that keeps them out of the hands of young children, prevents abuse, and is safe for the environment. Learn what medications can be disposed of at home and how, as well as how to find community and Drug Enforcement Agency take-back programs. 

Related Topics: Drug Safety



Pocket Film

OTC Pain Medication: What You Need to Know

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: February 4th, 2016

Tens of millions of Americans reach for over-the-counter (OTC) medications for relief of minor aches and pains.  But just because they’re OTC doesn’t mean they’re harmless.  And with more than 1,000 acetaminophen and NSAID containing medications, choosing the right one can seem overwhelming.  

Related Topics: Drug Safety



Pocket Film

Safely Taking and Storing OTC Pain Medication

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: February 4th, 2016

Once you choose an over-the-counter (OTC) pain medication that’s right for you or a loved one, it’s important to store it Up and Away and Out of Sight of young children and where it prevents misuse, and dispose of it properly when you no longer want it. 

Related Topics: Drug Safety




Public Comments

MCC Working Group Comment Letter

Author: Cynthia Bens

Date: January 26th, 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research's sent a comment letter concerning the Senate Finance Committees' Multiple Chronic Conditions (MCC) Working Group's policy options paper. The comment letter made recommendations concerning: stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation, healthcare-associated Infections, adult immunization, independence at home, and telehealth and remote patient monitoring. 



Public Comments

Comment Letter on CDC Opioid Guidelines

Author: Cynthia Bens

Date: January 12th, 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research wrote a letter to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) requesting modifications to the 2016 CDC Guidelines for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain. Specifically, the Alliance recommended the CDC modify the guidelines by: 

  • Including a statement calling for further investment of federal resources into clinical research to assist providers in tailoring long-term opioid use.
  • Requiring Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to provide an updated clinical evidence review of the guidelines
  • Calling on public and private payers to broadly cover the cost of non-pharmacologic interventions for pain sufferers. 
  • Adding more resources to www.cdc.gov on the safe use of non-opioid pain treatment
  • Removing the non-evidenced based dosage recommendations
  • Removing the time/specific pill limit for acute pain treatment



Public Comments

Alzheimer's Disease PCORI Priorities Letter

Author: Cynthia Bens

Date: January 5th, 2016

The Alliance for Aging Research submitted a letter to the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) suggesting possible research for the Institute to consider, aimed at improving outcomes for people with Alzheimer's disease. The Alliance encouraged the following topics:

  • Impact of non-pharmacologic interventions for Alzheimer’s disease on patient outcomes, caregiver burden and rates of institutionalization
  • Evaluation of screening methodologies, for relative ease/uptake and associated optimization across provider groups and settings of care;
  • Assessment of how Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis and treatment affects management of comorbidities;
  • Frequency of emergency room visits for Alzheimer’s disease patients and identification of
    best practices for potential mitigation;
  • Comparisons of currently available tools used to assess cognition to identify which is most
    effective for specific populations; and
  • Impact of knowing positive ApoE genotype status on patient, caregiver, and provider
    behaviors/outcomes as compared to ApoE negative status.
  •  





Public Comments

U.S. Pain Foundation Comments Regarding Legislation on Opioid Management, Incorporating Medical Expertise Act

Author: U.S. Pain Foundation

Date: December 10th, 2015

The Alliance and other organizations signed on with this December 10, 2015, letter produced by the U.S. Pain Foundation focused on Draft Legislation HR 4063, Promoting Responsible Opioid Management and Incorporating Medical Expertise Act.



Public Comments

S-FAR CARB Letter

Author: S-FAR

Date: December 7th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a U.S. Stakeholders Forum on Antimicrobial Resistance (S-FAR) letter in support of National Action Plan for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria (CARB). 



Public Comments

AFib Healthy People 2020 Letter

Author: AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force

Date: November 13th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research led AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force submitted a letter to the CDC commenting on the agency's Healthy People 2020 goals. The letter recommended:

  • The CDC should add Afib as a modifiable risk factor for stroke
  • The CDC address the under anticoagulation of older AFib patients as an emerging issue in heart disease and stroke



Public Comments

DefeatMalnutrition Letter

Author: DefeatMalnutrition

Date: November 13th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a letter from the DefeatMalnutrition coalition, regarding the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) Healthy People 2020 Objectives. 




Public Comments

S-FAR LTCF Letter

Author: S-FAR

Date: October 14th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a U.S. Stakeholder Forum on Antimicrobial Resistance (S-FAR)  letter in support of the antibiotic stewardship provisions in the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed rule revising the requirements long term care facilities (LTCFs) must meet to participate in Medicare and Medicaid programs.  



Public Comments

Alliance for Connected Care Chronic Conditions Letter

Author: Alliance for Connected Care

Date: October 1st, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a letter asking the Senate Finance Committee to create a transition mechanism by which the Secretary of Health and Human Services may lift originating site restrictions and allow payment for remote monitoring of Medicare beneficiaries suffering from chronic diseases. 



Public Comments

Letter to CMS on Proposed Rule Change regarding Infection Prevention and Control Programs in Long-Term Care Facilities (LTCFs)

Author: Susan Peschin

Date: September 14th, 2015

This is a letter from the Alliance to Centers to the Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) regarding its issuing of a proposed rule change regarding Infection Prevention and Control Programs (IPCP) in long-term care facilities (LTCFs).



Public Comments

Letter on CMS Proposed LTCF Rule

Author: Sue Peschin

Date: September 14th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research commented on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) proposed rule changes regarding Infection Prevention and Control Programs (IPCP) in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). The Alliance recommended:

  • A full implementation madate within two years of the final rule
  • Mandating the CDC's National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) for surveillance of Healthcare Associated Infections by LTCFs
  • CMS work directly with the CDC to outline specific programs that LTCFs should follow to fulfill mandates
  • CMS should mandate the CDC's CORE Elements for Antibiotic Stewardship in LTCFs
  • Contact information for an Infection Prevention and Control Officer (IPCO) be made publicly available for family members of LTCF patients
  • CMS should provide language mandating the use of influenza vaccinations among direct-contact health care workers in LTCFs and set targets for vaccination rates




Public Comments

Letter to Sen. Coons and Schatz Regarding OMB M 12 M Memo

Author: Various

Date: August 10th, 2015

This letter from a group of organizations including the Alliance thanks U.S. Sens Chris Coons and Brian Schatz for "championing the amendment to provide the Office of Management and Budget the flexibility to update its M-12-12 memo during the recent markup of the FY 2016 Financial Services and General Government Appropriations Act."



Whitepaper

Our Best Shot: Expanding Prevention through Vaccination in Older Adults

Date: July 28th, 2015

Our Best Shot: Expanding Prevention through Vaccination in Older Adults reviews vaccination levels, trends and targets, incidence rates, relevant health insurance coverage policies, and the cost effectiveness literature and other reports that have evaluated vaccine utilization in the older adult population



Public Comments

Friends of AHRQ FY16 Sign-On Letter

Author: Friends of AHRQ

Date: July 13th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a letter in support of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). The Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS) appropriations bill proposed reducing funding for the agency by 35 percent for FY2016. The support letter asked lawmakers to restore AHRQ's budget authority to $364 million in the final FY2016 appropriations legislation.




Public Comments

Letter to Senate Finance Committee Regarding Multiple Chronic Condition Legislation

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: June 22nd, 2015

This is a letter from the Alliance to the Senate Finance Committee applauding its "commitment to improving care for people living with multiple chronic conditions (MCC) and appreciate the opportunity to assist the Senate Finance Committee in developing comprehensive MCC legislation."



Public Comments

Protect Medical Innovation Act of 2015 Letter

Author: Cynthia Bens

Date: June 1st, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research submitted a letter to the Committee on Ways and Means to advocate for the Protect Medical Innovation Act of 2015. The bill amends the Internal Revenue code to repeal the excise tax on medical device manufacturers and importers. 







Public Comments

21st Century Cures Letter to House Members in Regard to NIH Funding

Author: Various

Date: May 13th, 2015

This letter from various organizations, including the Alliance for Aging Research, to various members of the U.S. House of Representatives acknowledged them for "including in the 21st Century Cures Act an additional $10 billion in funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) over five years."



Public Comments

LCAO Older Americans Act Letter

Date: May 4th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a letter in supporting S. 192, the bipartisan Older Americans Act of 2015, a bill that would ensure the important continuity of Older Americans Act (OAA) programs and services for three years. 




Public Comments

Letter to the Honorable Sylvia Mathews Burwell about the Better, Smarter, Healthier Initiative

Author: PIPC

Date: April 30th, 2015

This is a letter from the Partnership to Improve Patient Care (PIPC), which was also signed by the Alliance for Aging Research, to the Honorable Sylvia Mathews Burwell, secretary, Department of Health and Human Services, applauding her work to improve quality and patient-centeredness in health care through the Better, Smarter, Healthier initiative.




Public Comments

Letter on Funding for NHSN, Antibiotic Resistance Solutions Initiative, and AMD Initiative

Author: Various Organizations

Date: April 29th, 2015

This letter to Sen. Thad Cochran, Sen. Barbara Mikulski,  Rep. Harold Rogers, and Rep. Nita Lowey from various organizations, including the Alliance for Aging Research, requests "$32 million for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) and the Prevention Epicenters Program; $264 million for CDC’s Antibiotic Resistance Solutions Initiative; and ask for your continued support of the Advanced Molecular Detection (AMD) Initiative at $30 million in the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill. " 




Public Comments

Government Employee Travel Restriction Letter

Author: AAAS

Date: April 21st, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed on to a letter drafted by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) expressing concern on the impact of the Administration's regulations and legislative initiatives related to restricting government employee travel to scientific conferences. 



Public Comments

Letter to Ayotte, Bennet, Black, and Grisham on Assisting Caregivers Today (ACT) Caucus

Author: Various

Date: April 20th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research joined other organizations in this letter commending Sen. Kelly Ayotte,  Rep. Diane Black, Rep. Michael Bennet, and Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham for  their leadership in establishing and co-chairing the bipartisan, bicameral Assisting Caregivers Today (ACT) Caucus.



Public Comments

Letter to Various Representatives Regarding Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 302(b) Allocation for the Labor, HHS, Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee

Author: Various Organizations

Date: April 20th, 2015

This letter from various organizations, including the Alliance for Aging Research, to Rep. Harold Rogers, Rep. Tom Cole, Rep. Nita Lowey, and Rep. Rosa DeLauro requests "to restore the Fiscal Year (FY) 2016 302(b) allocation for the Labor, HHS, Education and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittee to at least the FY 2010 level of $163.6 billion." 






Public Comments

FY16 Afib Appropriations Sign-On Letter

Date: March 27th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed onto a letter requesting the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and other relevant NIH agencies, institutes, and offices provide technical assistance and otherwise support an effort to improve prevention of AFib-related stroke in older persons.




Public Comments

FY 2016 L-HHS Alzheimer's Disease Letter

Author: Misc. Organizations

Date: March 11th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research, USAgainstAlzheimer's, Cure Alzheimer's Foundation, BrightFocus Foundation, Leaders Engaged on Alzheimer's Disease, Alzheimer's Foundation of America, and American Academy of Neurology signed on to letters submitted to the House & Senate Labor, Health  and Human Services and Education and Related Agencies (L-HHS) Subcommittees, urging for a minimum of $2 billion for Alzheimer's disease and related dementias research supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).




Public Comments

Medicare Part D Non-Interference Letter

Date: March 4th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed a letter expressing opposition to proposals that would allow the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to interfere in private prescription drug negotiations in the Medicare Part D program.






Public Comments

Letter to Hatch and Bennet in Support of the Promise for Antibiotics and Therapeutics for Health (PATH) Act

Author: Various Organizations

Date: January 30th, 2015

This letter was from various organizations, including the Alliance for Aging Research, to Sen. Orrin Hatch and Sen. Michael Bennet to "express support for S. 185, the Promise for Antibiotics and Therapeutics for Health (PATH) Act, legislation to establish a new limited population antibacterial drug approval pathway for antibiotics to treat serious or life-threatening infections for which there exists an unmet medical need."




Pocket Film

Living with and Preventing Stroke from Atrial Fibrillation

Date: December 16th, 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) affects the way blood flows through the heart and makes it vulnerable for forming clots, which can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The risk of stroke in a person with AFib is 500% higher than in someone without the disease, so treatment to reduce stroke risk is essential. Anticoagulants, also called blood thinners, can help reduce the risk of stroke. Fatal bleeding while on an anticoagulant is rare, and for most AFib patients, the benefit of preventing AFib caused strokes outweighs the increased risk of bleeding. To learn more about stroke risk and AFib, visit our website at www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation

­.

Atrial Fibrillation, also known as AFib, is the most common type of arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat. An estimated 5 million Americans are currently living with AFib, and it becomes more common with age. AFib significantly increases a person’s risk of stroke, so it’s important to recognize its signs and symptoms and to seek treatment to reduce risk. However, it’s important to keep in mind that some people with AFib never experience symptoms, and are diagnosed when a health care professional detects an irregular heartbeat during a routine exam or during a visit for another health condition. Watch this short film to learn about the risk factors, causes, symptoms, and treatment options of AFib. For more information—including a patient brochure and quiz, visit our website at www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation.



Pocket Film

Cómo Prevenir una Apoplejía por Fibrilación Auricular

Date: December 16th, 2014

La fibrilación auricular (AFib) afecta la manera sangre fluye a través del corazón y lo hace vulnerable para la formación de coágulos, que pueden viajar al cerebro y causar un derrame cerebral. El riesgo de derrame cerebral en una persona con AFib es 500% más alto que en alguien sin la enfermedad, el tratamiento para reducir el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular es esencial. Anticoagulantes, también llamados anticoagulantes, pueden ayudar a reducir el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular. Tiempo hemorragia fatal en un anticoagulante es rara, y para la mayoría de los pacientes AFib, el beneficio de prevenir AFib causado accidentes cerebrovasculares supera el aumento del riesgo de sangrado. Para aprender más sobre el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular y AFib, visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/ atrialfibrillation.




Pocket Film

Cómo Vivir con el Tromboembolismo Venoso y Prevenir Coágulos Sanguíneos Mortales

Date: December 16th, 2014

El tromboembolismo venoso o TEV, es un término que incluye la trombosis venosa profunda y embolia pulmonar. TEV es común, y la mitad de todos los casos ocurren durante o poco después, una estancia en el hospital. Sin embargo, hay muchos factores, como el aumento de la edad que contribuyen a su riesgo de TEV . TEV es potencialmente peligrosa para la vida y se repite con frecuencia. Vea este cortometraje para averiguar los factores de riesgo, causas , síntomas y opciones de tratamiento de la ETV . Para obtener más información , incluyendo un folleto y concurso paciente , visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/VTE.



Pocket Film

Cómo Vivir con Fibrilación Auricular

Date: December 16th, 2014

Fibrilación auricular, también conocida como Fib A, es el tipo más común de arritmia, o latidos irregulares del corazón. Se estima que 5 millones de estadounidenses viven actualmente con AFib, y se vuelve más común con la edad. AFib aumenta significativamente el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular de una persona, por lo que es importante reconocer sus signos y síntomas y buscar tratamiento para reducir el riesgo. Sin embargo, es importante tener en cuenta que algunas personas con FibA nunca experimentan síntomas, y se diagnostican cuando un profesional de la salud detecta un latido irregular del corazón durante un examen de rutina o durante una visita para otra condición de salud. Vea este cortometraje para aprender acerca de los factores de riesgo, causas, síntomas y opciones de tratamiento de AFib. Para obtener más información , incluyendo un folleto y concurso paciente , visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation.



Meeting Summary

Exploring Scientific Evaluation and Intake Recommendations of Bioactive Compounds and the Public/Private Path to Get There

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: December 15th, 2014

On October 23, 2014, the Alliance for Aging Research, with support from Mars, Inc., convened key stakeholders from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and other non-profit organizations, the U.S. and Canadian Governments, academia, and private industry to discuss scientific evaluation of bioactive compounds. Dr. Joanne Lupton, Distinguished Professor of Nutrition at Texas A&M University, co-chaired the meeting with Susan Peschin, President and CEO of the Alliance for Aging Research, and described the goals of the meeting as follows: (1) to identify concrete ideas for creating an evaluation process for bioactives, including intake recommendations, and (2) to address issues with and opportunities for public-private partnerships. She also shared a working definition of bioactive compounds and suggested it be used for the discussion: Bioactives, according to the working definition, are “constituents in foods or dietary supplements, other than those needed to meet basic human needs, which are responsible for changes in health status.”

The meeting included four presentations that helped frame the discussion. These presentations were on perspectives from the Subcommittee on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), application of the DRI paradigm to bioactives, lessons learned from research on cocoa flavanols, and development of public-private partnerships.

Download the full meeting summary to learn more.



Brochure

Living with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib)

Date: December 1st, 2014

Atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF) is the most common type of irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia.  An estimated five million Americans are currently living with AFib. People with AFib have a higher risk of stroke, heart failure, dementia, other heart-related complications, and even death. Read this brochure to find out more about this condition.



Brochure

Living with Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

Date: December 1st, 2014

Venous thromboembolism, or VTE, is a term that includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.  It is common--affecting as many as 600,000 Americans.  While approximately half of all cases are related to hospitalization, there are numerous causes and risk factors that may cause VTE in non-hospitalized individuals.

VTE recurs (or happens again) frequently and can cause long-term complications and even death.  However, recognizing symptoms, seeking prompt medical attention, and getting proper treatment can significantly reduce complications and save your life.

Read this brochure to find out more about risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.










Fact Sheet

Tips for Grandparents on Safe Medicine Storage

Date: September 4th, 2014

As part of a collaboration with the CHPA Educational Foundation, the Alliance is helping spread the word about safe medicine storage in grandparents--who are increasingly involved in the primary care of young children.  This tip sheet, based largely on insightful and important data from Safe Kids Worldwide, is designed to be shared with seniors to help them keep their grandchildren safe.






Pocket Film

Heart Valve Disease in Women

Date: September 1st, 2014

Each year, as many as 5 million Americans are diagnosed with heart valve disease--a cardiovascular condition that affects men and women of all ages, but that becomes increasingly more common with age.  An estimated 1 in 50 women have valve disease--growing to 1 in 10 by age 75 and older.

This short "pocket film" teaches women more about valve disease--how you get it, how you detect it, and how you treat it.  

 



Report

From Plan to Practice: Implementing the National Alzheimer's Plan in Your State

Author: National Alliance for Caregiving and the Alzheimer's Foundation of America

Date: July 21st, 2014

A new report from the National Alliance for Caregiving and the Alzheimer's Foundation of America focuses on the next steps in developing comprehensive plans to provide support and services to people with Alzheimer's disease and their family caregivers.  The Alliance is very proud to have been able to help support this important report.



Pocket Film

A Quick Look at Alzheimer's

Date: July 1st, 2014

These short, animated “pocket films” (~2 to 3 minutes each) are designed to be viewed anywhere at any time: a doctor’s office, a Congressional hallway, a family living room, and more. They were created to help reduce stigma, improve care, and help the public fight against Alzheimer’s disease.  They have captured millions of views in the U.S. and around the globe.

The films were written and directed by David Shenk, animated by Jossie Malis, narrated by David Hyde Pierce, with music by Kreidler.  They were also reviewed by an advisory board including Naomi S. Boak, Steven T. DeKosky, MD, Geri R. Hall, PhD, Rudolph E. Tanzi, PhD,and John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD.  They are available in English, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese (Traditional and Simplified), Farsi, French, German, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, Russian, and Bulgarian.

The films are free for educational use.  Find them online at www.aboutalz.org and on YouTube.  Add them to your own website or PowerPoint presentation, play them on your phone or tablet, and send them to colleagues and friends.  You can also purchase a DVD copy of the films for $0.70 S&H here.

The films include:

  • What is Alzheimer's Disease?
  • An Urgent Epidemic
  • The Race to the Cure
  • A Message for Patients and their Families
  • The Genetics of Alzheimer's



Health Care Professional Resources

Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: A pocket guide to current guidelines and recommendations

Date: June 9th, 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) affects around 5% of patients age 65 and older and 10% of patients age 80 or older.  AFib is associated with a 5-fold risk of stroke so patients with AFib are often treated with anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy, both of which increase the risk of bleeding.  Examining individual patient risk factors can help providers manage bleeding risk while reducing risk of stroke in patients with AFib.  This pocket guide outlines the similarities and differences in current AFib guidelines, as well as efforts from major medical organizations to guide decision-making for stroke prevention in AFib (SPAF).




Volume

The Silver Book: Infectious Diseases and Prevention through Vaccination

Date: December 5th, 2013

The Silver Book® provides the latest statistics on the prevalence of infectious diseases that disproportionately affect seniors such as pneumonia, influenza (“flu”), and herpes zoster (“shingles”). Seniors are more susceptible to developing a significant illness from these common infectious diseases, which too often lead to hospitalization, severe complications, and death. In fact, the death rate from pneumonia and influenza combined is close to 130 times higher in people age 85 and older, compared to people ages 45 to 54. This increased risk due to age is even higher than that seen in heart disease, stroke, cancer, and other leading causes of death.







Pocket Film

Sepsis in Older Americans: Saving Lives through Early Recognition

Date: July 31st, 2013

Sepsis is a life-threatening medical condition caused by an infection.  Anyone can get sepsis, but older adults face an increased risk.  The key to fighting sepsis is recognizing it early and treating it quickly.  This short film offers an informative, engaging overview of how to recognize the signs of sepsis and how you can take action.



Fact Sheet

The Silver Book: Healthcare-Associated Infections Factsheet

Date: July 22nd, 2013

Every year more than 1.7 million Americans are diagnosed with healthcare-associated infections (HAIs).  Around 99,000 people die from their infection and the cost to U.S. hospitals alone is estimated at $28.4 to $45 billion annually.  These numbers are only going to grow as the rate of infection rises and more and more develop resistance to antibiotics.  This fact sheet paints a comprehensive picture of the growing burden of healthcare-associated infections, and the value of innovation in helping to reduce that burden.




Fact Sheet

The Silver Book: Atrial Fibrillation fact sheet

Date: February 1st, 2013

Atrial fibrillation impacts between 2.7 and 6.1 million adults and can lead to stroke, heart failure, dementia, disability, and death. It also costs a tremendous amount of money--at least $6.65 billion each year. This latest factsheet from The Silver Book brings the leading data on the burden of the disease and the value of innovation to reduce that burden, all into one place.



Whitepaper

The Transformative Promise of Aging Research

Date: December 1st, 2012

A momentous trend affecting the health of both our citizens and economy will unfold over the next two decades as baby boomers reach their high-risk years for diseases of aging. One of the most worrying aspects of this shift is its effect on the federal budget as the U.S. government is confronted with ballooning healthcare bills. Recent projections suggest that Medicare, which boomers began enrolling in this year, will be insolvent by 2029, though that may happen sooner if optimistic assumptions about its future costs prove wrong. Growing federal deficits largely due to healthcare costs have already put us on “a path of debt growth that is unsustainable,” according to a recent assessment by Harvard healthcare policy researchers. Even if we greatly reduce the growth rate of healthcare spending, which historically has exceeded GDP growth by about 2.5 percentage points, our estimated federal debt-to-GDP ratio will still reach as high as 200% by 2050—nearly quadruple the current ratio of 53%. A debt burden that heavy, wrote the Harvard researchers, could well lead to “financial Armageddon.”



Whitepaper

Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation--Consensus Statement Executive Summary

Date: December 1st, 2012

This executive summary shares the critical conclusions from the expert consensus statement that makes important recommendations on the use of stroke and bleeding risk tools, the decision to anticoagulate, the incorporation of patient preferences, and more.  Read the full consensus here

The experts include Mark J. Alberts, MD; Mary Amantangelo, MS, ACNP-BC, CCRN; Kenneth A. Bauer, MD; Lynne T. Braun, PhD, CNP, FAHA; Henry I. Bussey, PharmD; A. John Camm, MD, QHP, FRCP, FACC, FESC, FMedSci, FHRS, CStJ; David Garcia, MD; Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD; Jonathan L. Halperin, MD; Mellanie True Hills; Alan K. Jacobson, MD; Gregory Y.H. Lip, MD, FRCP, FESC, FACC; Edith A. Nutescu, PharmD, FCCP; Daniel E. Singer, MD; Albert L. Waldo, MD, FACC, FAHA, FHRS, FAACP



Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation--2012

Date: September 28th, 2012

September 28, 2012

Agency for Health Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC Mail code: BICC 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Oregon 97239-3098
Re: Draft Report on Comparative Effectiveness Review (CER) of Stroke Prevention in Atrial
Fibrillation
 

Dear Sir or Madam,

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, was formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for older patients with AFib. We submitted comments to the Agency for Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) in October of 2011 on the importance of reviewing both stroke and bleeding risk assessment tools in the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness study of stroke prevention in AFib, and we appreciate the opportunity to provide additional comments on the findings included in the draft report.



Public Comments

PQRS Submitted Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Date: September 4th, 2012

September 4, 2012

Marilyn Tavenner
Acting Administrator
 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Department of Health and Human Services
Attn: CMS-1590-P P.O. Box 8013
Baltimore, MD 21244-8013

 RE: Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Dear Administrator Tavenner:

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess both stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for patients with AFib. We appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Our comments on the proposed rule will be limited to a new measure #1525, Chronic Anticoagulation Therapy, which is under consideration by CMS for inclusion in the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) for CY2013. Recent expert consensus led by the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force supports the use of this measure but with an additional recommendation to encourage routine and proper bleeding risk assessment. We urge you to include a modified version of measure #1525 in the final rule that encourages a bleeding risk assessment in addition to a stroke risk assessment to ensure that Medicare beneficiaries with AFib are presented with all treatment options that may be available for them.



Survey

Atrial Fibrillation Patient Survey—Highlights

Date: September 1st, 2012

This survey of more than 500 atrial fibrillation patients, ages 65+ from across the nation, revelead diagnosis and treatment experiences, information on anticoagulant use, stroke and bleeding risk discussions with health care professionals, and more.  It was conducted as part of the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force.

You can also read the FULL RESULTS.

 



Survey

Atrial Fibrillation Patient Survey—Full Results

Date: September 1st, 2012

This survey of more than 500 atrial fibrillation patients, ages 65+ from across the nation, revelead diagnosis and treatment experiences, information on anticoagulant use, stroke and bleeding risk discussions with health care professionals, and more.  It was conducted as part of the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force.

You can also read the SURVEY HIGHLIGHTS.



Whitepaper

Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation—Consensus Statement

Date: July 1st, 2012

This expert consensus statement makes important recommendations on the use of stroke and bleeding risk tools, the decision to anticoagulate, the incorporation of patient preferences, and more.  Read an executive summary.

The experts include Mark J. Alberts, MD; Mary Amantangelo, MS, ACNP-BC, CCRN; Kenneth A. Bauer, MD; Lynne T. Braun, PhD, CNP, FAHA; Henry I. Bussey, PharmD; A. John Camm, MD, QHP, FRCP, FACC, FESC, FMedSci, FHRS, CStJ; David Garcia, MD; Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD; Jonathan L. Halperin, MD; Mellanie True Hills; Alan K. Jacobson, MD; Gregory Y.H. Lip, MD, FRCP, FESC, FACC; Edith A. Nutescu, PharmD, FCCP; Daniel E. Singer, MD; Albert L. Waldo, MD, FACC, FAHA, FHRS, FAACP



Report

Translating Innovation to Impact: Evidence-based interventions to support people with Alzheimer's disease and their caregivers at home and in the community

Author: Alliance for Aging Research, Administration on Aging, MetLife Foundation

Date: June 1st, 2012

This white paper presents the findings and recommendations from a review of the state of the art non-pharmacological treatments and care practices for people with Alzheimer's or other dementias and their family caregivers. It is intended to support deliberations by the Advisory Council on Alzheimer's Research, Care and Services, the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) and other government and private organizations about how to make effective non-pharmacological treatments and care practices available to people who will benefit from then. Its development resulted from a public-private partnership between AoA and the Alliance for Aging Research, with funding from the Metlife Foundation. Download the white paper below.





Document

Translating Innovation to Impact: Pre-reads

Date: June 1st, 2012

On June 28, 2012 the Alliance for Aging Research and its project partner the U.S. Administration on Aging (AoA), convened Translating Innovation to Impact, a one-day working meeting to review the state of research into evidence-based interventions to help people with Alzheimer’s remain healthy and independent in the community while reducing the stress on their caregivers.

This document provides the agenda and pre-reads for that important meeting.



Volume

The Silver Book: Vision Loss Volume II

Date: April 1st, 2012

More than 38 million Americans age 40 and older are blind, visually impaired, or have an age-related eye disease, and adult vision loss costs our economy more than $51 billion a year. With major advances in vision research bringing new prevention and treatments, it is critical that support for research and incentives for innovation remain a priority.

In order to highlight this important data and encourage conversations and policies that look to investments in innovation rather than short-term cost-cutting and health care rationing, the Alliance for Aging Research has teamed up with the Alliance for Eye and Vision Research (AEVR) during their Decade of Vision, to release Volume II of The Silver Book®:Vision Loss. Volume II brings updated data on age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma—which along with cataract, are the eye diseases that disproportionately impact older Americans. This new volume also highlights the exciting changes and discoveries in vision research and treatment from the past 5 years.



Public Comments

PCORI Submitted Comments on National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Date: March 5th, 2012

March 15, 2012

Joe V. Selby, M.D., M.P.H.
Executive Director
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
1701 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20006

RE: Comments on PCORI National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Dear Dr. Selby:

The groups below comprise a task force of leading organizations in the thrombosis space that are exploring issues related to optimal stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Participants in this task force represent various audiences—from patients to health care providers—that are unified by the desire to improve the way in which stroke and bleeding risk are assessed in atrial fibrillation patients and ensure proper treatment of these patients. In our capacity as health care stakeholders, we support the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s (PCORI) mission to improve health care delivery and outcomes by producing and promoting high integrity, evidence-based information that comes from research guided by patients, caregivers and the health care community. As such we appreciate the opportunity to comment on PCORI’s national research priorities and research agenda.



Article

The Caregivers Voice--Interview with Dan Perry

Date: January 26th, 2012

The Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) Biomarker Expert Working Group just published a new paper in Neurobiology of Aging. They recommend that certain AD biomarkers be used for clinical assessments, enrolling study participants, and as an outcome in AD clinical trials.



Fact Sheet

Our T.A.K.E. on Glaucoma

Date: October 7th, 2011

A Declaration from the Glaucoma Working Group to Take Action to Know your Eyes

Today, more than 40 million Americans are age 65 or older.  By 2050, it is estimated that figure will rise to 88.5 million.  Our nation is aging rapidly, and this demographic shift likely means longer hospital stays, more doctor visits, and greater healthcare expenditures for more and more Americans.  If you're a Baby Boomer and looking ahead to your silver years, you already have plenty to think about: retirement, the economy, elderly parents, and young adult children.  It's hard to find time to focus on your health--especially if you feel healthy!

One condition that's often overlooked as we age is glaucoma--damage to the optic nerve that can lead to progressive, insidious, irreversible vision loss.  Glaucoma is one of the leading causes of blindness in the world, affecting 60.5 million people today and set to reach 79.6 million by 2020.  Early detection and proper management can help prevent the serious outcomes of glaucoma.  Yet for some reason, the disease continues to be under-diagnosed and associated with poor treatment adherence.

Why is glaucoma often overlooked by patients, when eyesight is so precious?  We convened a panel of experts known as the Glaucoma Working Group to address this question.  The group examined underlying challenges surrounding glaucoma diagnosis and management, and proposed solutions to help educate, motivate, and empower two audiences: those who are at risk for glaucoma but are not diagnosed ("undiagnosed patients") and those who have been diagnosed but may be under-treated ("diagnosed patients").

This document contains an overview of the Glaucoma Working Group's discussions, which may be of interest to eye care professionals (ECPs), advocacy groups, and policymakers.  It also includes a powerful call to action that we hope will inspire you--the patient--to take an active role in managing glaucoma and help protect the gift of sight.

Scott R. Christensen
President & CEO
The Glaucoma Foundation

Daniel P. Perry
President & CEO
The Alliance for Aging Research

Related Topics: Vision Loss




Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Date: October 4th, 2011

AHRQ Comments

Home > Aging Topics > Atrial Fibrillation > AHRQ Comments

October 14, 2011
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC
Mail Code: BICC
3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97239-3098

RE: Comment on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Dear Sir or Madam:

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on AHRQ’s key questions related to the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness review of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We believe this is an important time to review in light of the growing impact atrial fibrillation has on our aging population and the uncertainty that exists about the best way to treat older patients with the condition.



Fact Sheet

The Facts About AFib

Date: August 1st, 2011

The most common type of arrhythmia—or abnormal heart rhythm—atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a disorder of the heart’s electrical system that affects an estimated 2.3 to 5.6 million people in the US. During AFib episodes the heart’s upper chambers (the atria) beat irregularly and out of sync with the heart’s lower chambers (the ventricles). In some people these episodes come and go. In others they are chronic and occur regularly. In both cases, the arrhythmia itself isn’t generally serious; however, abnormal blood flow and strain to the heart can lead to serious medical conditions.

Download to learn more about what it means to have AFib, risk factors, treatment options, and making the right treatment decision for you.



Volume

The Silver Book: Thrombosis

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: March 11th, 2011

Each year around 75,000 Americans are diagnosed with AFib, 900,000 experience a VTE event, adn 800,000 have a stroke.  Some 2 million Americans die from thrombosis or its consequences.  The burden for those who survive is enormous and the cost of care a major expense for individuals and the nation.  Stroke alone costs around $73.7 billion annually.  Fortunately research advances are offering significant hope.  

This volume of The Silver Book shares the facts and statistics on the burden of thrombosis, as well as the progress and potential of research in the field.



DVD

A Quick Look at Alzheimer's: Pocket Film - The Genetics of Alzheimer's

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: March 1st, 2011

The latest in a series of animated films that explain the essence of the disease and its public health implications, The Genetics of Alzheimer's explores the role of genes in developing the disease. These films are designed to increase understanding in order to reduce stigma, improve care and help strengthen the public fight against this challenging disease.



Whitepaper

AFib Optimal Treatment Expert Roundtable--Effecting Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Anticoagulation Decision-Making

Date: January 1st, 2011

This roundtable explored the risk assessment tools and their limitations, discussed how the tools should be updated to overcome those limitations and to reflect the data from emerging therapies, formed consensus on what steps should be taken to address any proposed guideline changes and call for mandates, and considered how best to raise awareness amongst health care professionals on this expert consensus and the need for new best practices.

Read the consensus document that was produced as a result.





Brochure

About Valve Disease: Talking with Your Doctor

Date: June 1st, 2010

This quick guide to talking wtih your doctor or health care professional about valve disease includes information for patients who think they may have a valve problem, as well as for those who know that they have a type of valve disease.  This resource can help make these important conversations a little bit easier.

A companion piece provides background information on valve disease and its treatment.

You can also visit the Alliance's Valve Disease page to learn more about valve disease, and Aortic Stenosis page to learn more about this common type of valve disease.



Brochure

Heart Valve Disease: Patient Information

Date: June 1st, 2010

This brochure includes basics on valve disease—what it is, how you get it, how you know you have it, and how it's diagnosed.  It also covers broad treatment options, what to expect after surgery, and a list of helpful resources.

A companion piece provides tips on starting a conversation with your health care professional about valve disease.

You can also visit the Alliance's Valve Disease page to learn more about valve disease, and Aortic Stenosis page to learn more about this common type of valve disease.



Brochure

Living with Alzheimer's: A Personal Health Organizer

Date: June 1st, 2010

This 3-ring, hardcover binder includes the necesssary tools you need to sort through all of the information that comes your way.  It is designed to help the person who has just been diagnosed, but many of the worksheets can be used together with familiy members or by caregivers of those who are in later stages of the disease.

Since no one experiences Alzheimer's in the same way, your binder can be organized in a way that best fits your needs.

The binder includes a brochure and worksheets





Presentation

The Severe Burden of Diabetes on America's Seniors

Author: Dr. William Rowley

Date: May 1st, 2010

In an Alliance for Aging Research and American Diabetes Association joint briefing, Dr. William Rowley from The Institute for Alternative Futures presented on the economic burden of diabetes and the need for continued research into prevention, management and treatment options. His slides are available here.

Related Topics: Silver Book / Diabetes



Presentation

Human Burden of Diabetes and the Importance of Research

Author: Dr. K.M. Venkat Narayan

Date: May 1st, 2010

In an Alliance for Aging Research and American Diabetes Association joint briefing, Dr. K.M. Venkat Narayan from Emory University in Atlanta presented on the human burden of diabetes and the need for continued research into prevention, management and treatment options. His slides are available here.

Related Topics: Silver Book / Diabetes



Testimony

Alliance President Makes Remarks at a Hearing on Prescription Drug User Fee Act Reauthorization

Date: April 1st, 2010

On April 12th, Alliance President & CEO Daniel Perry presented remarks at a public meeting on the reauthorization process for the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA). PDUFA IV, currently set to expire in September of 2012, authorizes the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to collect user fees from companies wishing to submit their products for agency review. The intention is that the fees would be used to provide an additional revenue stream for FDA to hire more staff, improve systems, and establish a better managed drug review process to speed up the delivery of needed therapies to the public.

The PDUFA reauthorization process has historically been conducted through negotiations between the Agency and regulated industries, however the current round of negotiations are open to broader participation and transparency. The FDA will be seeking feedback from patient and consumer groups as well as the general public before entering into formal negotiations with industry and also before submitting its recommendations to Congress. This meeting was the first opportunity the patient community had to comment on how it views the performance of PDUFA and what elements should be reconsidered in the PDUFA V reauthorization.

In his remarks, Mr. Perry stressed the importance of FDA increasing stakeholder involvement in the regulatory process to address any barriers that slow patient access to new therapies. He also emphasized the need for FDA to have the ability to play a more significant role in encouraging the development of new therapies for diseases like Alzheimer’s disease, by providing guidance on streamlining clinical trial designs, the qualifying biomarker for use in development, and assessing the benefits and risks of new therapies post-approval so as not to delay treatments for patients who may benefit from them. Lastly, Mr. Perry highlighted the fact that user fees cannot be the sole source of support for the FDA; they must be balanced with Congressional appropriations. The full text of Mr. Perry's remarks can be downloaded from the link on this page.




Volume

The Silver Book: Diabetes

Date: March 1st, 2010

The first volume of The Silver Book was launched in 2006 and has quickly become a trusted resource for health policy practitioners. The Silver Book®: Diabetes is the latest volume in this important collection. Each section in the volume includes charts, statistics, and key findings that together paint a comprehensive picture of the burden of diabetes and the tremendous potential of innovation. Much of the data focuses on the older population.

Related Topics: Silver Book / Diabetes




Fact Sheet

Practical Facts for Health Care Providers: Assessing and Treating Persistent Pain in Older Patients

Date: December 1st, 2009

Persistent pain is a common problem in older adults, yet many are reluctant to discuss it with their health care provider. They may see pain as an inevitable part of aging, or believe it’s not possible to relieve their symptoms.

Many times it is left up to the health care provider to ask questions of their elderly patients and figure out if pain is a problem. This fact sheet is a summary of the 2009 American Geriatrics Society (AGS) guidelines on the management of persistent pain in older persons. It highlights the AGS panel's main recommendations on assessing and treating persistent pain.

You may also want to share our patient brochure that provides important pain management information.





Survey

Pain Management Survey

Author: Clarus Research Group

Date: September 1st, 2009

The Alliance for Aging Research commissioned a nationwide survey of 800 U.S. adults age 65 and older to better understand their attitudes, perceptions and concerns regarding age-related pain management and changes under consideration by the FDA to over-the-counter acetaminophen products. Clarus Research Group conducted the survey on behalf of the Alliance for Aging Research between September 14 and September 18, 2009. Support for the survey was provided by McNeil Consumer Healthcare, Division of McNeil-PPC, Inc.



Presentation

Bone Health of Americans is in Jeopardy

Author: Dr. Joan Lappe

Date: July 1st, 2008

In an Alliance for Aging Research, National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) joint briefing, Dr. Joan Lappe presented on the human burden of osteoporosis and the need for continued research into prevention and treatment options. Her slides are available here.



Presentation

The Value of Innovation in Osteoporosis

Author: Rachael Fleurence, PhD

Date: July 1st, 2008

In an Alliance for Aging Research, National Osteoporosis Foundation (NOF) joint briefing, Rachael Fleurence, PhD, presented on the current economic burden of osteoporosis and the value of innovation in reducing that burden. Her slides are available here.



Podcast

Standing Strong: Preventing Osteoporosis with Dr. Michelle Bellantoni

Date: June 1st, 2008

What foods are good for your bones and which ones may be hurting them? What exercise is best for warding off weak bones? When should you start getting your bones scanned?

Find out the answers and get other interesting tips on prevention and treatment in this podcast with Dr. Michelle Bellantoni from Johns Hopkins University. An expert in osteoporosis, Dr. Bellantoni discusses the details of prevention and talks about some of the latest news and research on osteoporosis.



Brochure

Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Caregiver Workbook

Date: April 1st, 2008

This workbook s an interactive resource that helps caregivers develop a personalized action plan to take better care of their loved ones and themselves. It includes worksheets on important issues such as making your home safe, preparing for a health care appointment, keeping a health journal, and dealing with financial planning.

The worksheets are useful tools for getting organized and keeping track of a lot of the information that comes with caring for someone with Alzheimer's disease. You can download and print out extra copies of these worksheets by clicking the links below:

You may also want to download this caregiver brochure which provides some of the many resources that will help you form a network of support and take care of yourself, while taking care of your loved one.



Fact Sheet

Alzheimer's Disease Workbook: Health Journal Worksheet

Date: April 1st, 2008

It's useful to keep a health journal so you can ensure that your loved one's health care team is able to provide the best care possible. By keeping track of day-to-day health information that only you may observe, you can provide valuable information to your loved one's health care team. A journal also makes it easy to record information about Alzheimer's disease and other conditions your loved one may have, so you can make the most of your time at appointments and be sure not to forget anything.

To access other helpful worksheets, download Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Workbook.



Fact Sheet

Alzheimer's Disease Workbook: Health Care Appointment Worksheet

Date: April 1st, 2008

Taking your loved one to health care appointments may become difficult at times. If you prepare for appointments by writing down questions and scheduling the appointments at a good time for your loved one, you can make sure that the appointment goes as smoothly as possible. Use this worksheet to record information about the appointment so that it's all in one place.

To access other helpful worksheets, download Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Workbook.



Fact Sheet

Alzheimer's Disease: Medication List Worksheet

Date: April 1st, 2008

Your loved one may take many medications for Alzheimer's disease and other health conditions. Keeping track of them helps the health care team make sure the medications are working well together, and find possible drug interactions. You can use this medication list worksheet to keep all of the information about your loved one's medications in one place.

To access other helpful worksheets, download Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Workbook.



Fact Sheet

Alzheimer's Disease: Clinical Trial Worksheet

Date: April 1st, 2008

While there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease, there are drugs that may improve or stabilize symptoms. New drugs are also under development that offer hope for Alzheimer's patients, and clinical trials test whether these treatments are safe and effective. If you haven't already, you may want to consider enrolling your loved one in a clinical trial. This worksheet is a log that can help you keep track of clinical trials that you find.

To access other helpful worksheets, download Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Workbook.



Fact Sheet

Alzheimer's Disease Workbook: Home Safety Checklist

Date: April 1st, 2008

Alzheimer's disease progresses differently in everyone, but eventually it will affect your loved one's independence. The typical home environment may become unfamiliar and dangerous, but there are steps you can take to make the home less stressful. Use this checklist to make sure that your loved one's residence is safe.

To access other helpful worksheets, download Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Workbook.



Fact Sheet

Alzheimer's Disease Workbook: Financial & Legal Checklist

Date: April 1st, 2008

By starting the financial and legal planning process now, you can make sure that your loved one is cared for as their disease progresses. It's important for you to start this process early, because Alzheimer's disease will gradually make it harder for your loved one to participate in planning. Use this checklist to get you started.

To access other helpful worksheets, download Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Workbook.



Fact Sheet

Alzheimer's Disease Workbook: Personal Schedule Worksheet

Date: April 1st, 2008

As Alzheimer's disease progresses, your loved one will need more and more care. While you may feel that you don't have time to think about yourself, it is important to remember your own health and well-being. By exercising, thinking about your health, and giving yourself time to relax, you will stay healthier and be able to spend more time with your loved one. Use this log to keep track of health care appointments, your exercise schedule, social engagements, etc.

To access other helpful worksheets, download Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One--Workbook.




Brochure

Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One—Caregiver Brochure

Date: April 1st, 2008

This brochure provides some of the many resources that will help you form a network of support and take care of yourself, while taking care of your loved one.  The brochure is also availabe in Spanish.

You may also want to download this caregiver workbook that helps caregivers develop a personalized action plan to take better care of their loved ones and themselves.



Workshop Kit

Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One—Workshop Kit

Date: April 1st, 2008

This workshop kit is designed for community leaders in order to provide all of the tools necessary to conduct a workshop/seminar for family caregivers.  It contains:

  • A leaders' guide with tips and instructions on conducting a workshop, as well as the latest information on treatments and research
  • A caregiver workbook that helps caregivers develop a personalized action plan to take better care of their loved ones and themselves
  • A caregiver brochure that provides some of the many resources that will help caregivers form a network of support and take care of themselves
  • A DVD that shares the story of a family dealing with Alzheimer's



Brochure

Alzheimer's Disease: Helping Yourself Help a Loved One—Leader's Guide

Date: April 1st, 2008

This leader's guide gives tips and instructions for community leaders on how to conduct a workshop/seminars for caregivers of loved ones with Alzheimer's disease.  It also shares the latest information on treatments and research.  The guide is also available in Spanish.

It is part of a larger workshop kit for community and health leaders.




Presentation

The Burden of Diabetes and the Promise of Biomedical Research

Author: Dr. John Anderson

Date: October 1st, 2007

In the last of four briefings looking at the growing burden of chronic disease and the promise of medical innovation, Dr. John Anderson of the American Diabetes Association's National Advocacy Committee, presented on The Burden of Diabetes and the Promise of Biomedical Research. His presentation slides are available here.

Related Topics: Silver Book / Diabetes






Presentation

The Societal Burden of Alzheimer's Disease

Author: Jennifer Zeitzer

Date: September 1st, 2007

In the third of four briefings looking at the growing burden of chronic disease and the promise of medical innovation, Jennifer Zeitzer of the Alzheimer's Association presented on The Societal Burden of Alzheimer's Disease. Her presentation slides are available here.



Testimony

Fiscal Year 2008 Appropriations for the National Institute on Aging: U.S. Senate, Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies

Date: March 30th, 2007

Daniel Perry of the Alliance for Aging Research, and Carol Schutz of the Gerontological Society of America, submitted this testimony on behalf of the Friends of the National Institute on Aging. The testimony called for a 6.7% overall increase for the National Institutes of Health for FY 2008 and additional resources for NIA in order to avoid continued cuts in existing grants and to sustain training and research opportunities for new investigators.





Presentation

Pharmaceutical Innovation and Cancer Survival

Author: Frank R. Lichtenberg

Date: October 1st, 2006

At the first of four briefings looking at the growing burden of chronic disease and the promise of innovation, Frank R. Lichtenberg presented The Economic Argument for Medical Innovation. The slides from his presentation are available here.

Related Topics: Silver Book / Cancer



Presentation

Oncology and Innovation: The potential and the promise

Author: Len Lichtenfeld, MD, FACP

Date: October 1st, 2006

In the first of four briefings looking at the growing burden of chronic disease and the promise of innovation, Dr. Len Lichtenfeld presented Oncology and Innovation: The Potential and Promise. The presentation slides are available here.

Related Topics: Silver Book / Cancer



Health Care Professional Resources

Women and Heart Disease: What They Need You to Tell Them—A Physician's Guide

Date: September 1st, 2006

This guide gives tips on starting a heart healthy conversation with patients and helps bridge the awareness gap about women and heart disease.

You can also share this quiz with your patients to help them learn more about their heart health.  That print quiz is also available on-line.








Testimony

Fiscal Year 2007 Appropriations for the National Institute on Aging: U.S. Senate, Subcommittee on Labor Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies

Date: April 28th, 2006

Daniel Perry of the Alliance for Aging Research, and Carol Schutz of the Gerontological Society of America, submitted this testimony on behalf of the Friends of the National Institute on Aging. The testimony called for a 5% overall increase for the National Institutes of Health for FY 2007 and additional resources for NIA in order to avoid an 18% cut in existing grants and to sustain training and research opportunities for new investigators.




Survey

Colon Cancer: Caring for the Aging--Key Survey Findings

Author: Harris Interactive

Date: November 1st, 2005

The Alliance commissioned a survey, conducted by Harris Interactive, that interviewed oncologists on the importance of caregivers for elderly colon cancer patients. 77% of physicians interviewed agreed that colon cancer patients 65 and older experience better disease outcomes when a caregiver is involved because of better communication. 81% also said that they depend on caregivers at least somewhat, and some a great deal, to act as an intermediary between them and the elderly patients. 100% fell the caregiver is part of a team involved in the patient's disease management.

The physicians felt that the primary roles of the caregivers are to provide emotional support, participate in doctor's visits and in disease management decisions, and to provide transportation to and from doctor's appointments. Unfortunately, only around three out of five colon cancer patients age 65 and older have the support of a caregiver.



Survey

Colon Cancer: Caring for the Aging

Date: October 1st, 2005

Colon cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States and will kill more than 50,000 people this year. A major risk factor for colon cancer is age, with more than 90% of cases occurring in people 50 years and older. Unfortunately, clinical evidence suggests that colon cancer patients 65 and older are not always getting the best disease management. However, a recent survey commissioned by the Alliance for Aging Research shows that caregivers play an important role in disease management and can have a major positive impact on disease outcomes.

The survey, conducted by Harris Interactive, interviewed oncologists on the importance of caregivers for elderly colon cancer patients. 77% of physicians interviewed agree that colon cancer patients 65 and older experience better disease outcomes when a caregiver is involved because of better communication. 81% also said that they depend on caregivers at least somewhat, and some a great deal, to act as an intermediary between them and the elderly patients. 100% feel the caregiver is part of a team involved in the patient's disease management. The physicians felt that the primary roles of the caregivers are to provide emotional support, participate in doctor's visits and in disease management decisions, and to provide transportation to and from doctor's appointments. Unfortunately, only around 3 out of 5 colon cancer patients 65 and older have the support of a caregiver.

Over 100 oncologists were interviewed, all of whom practice in the United States, treat at least 10 colorectal cancer patients per month, and have been practicing between 3 and 30 years. The survey included questions on how many patients have caregivers, who those caregivers are, their importance in disease management, their primary roles, and their participation in communication and treatment options.

 



Report

New Age of Aging: Key Survey Findings

Date: April 1st, 2004

In March and April of 2002, the Alliance sponsored a telephone survey of Baby Boomers and adults older than the Baby Boom generation.  Opinion Research Corp. conducted the survey of more than 1,000 individuals.  The results were released at an all-day editors' conference - Mature in a New Millenium in New York.

Related Topics: Prevention






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