Publications

This page features brochures, newsletters, white papers, videos, and other resources devoted to the latest scholarship in aging research, age-related diseases and conditions, and living healthier, longer. Many publications are also available in hard copy

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Health Care Professional Resources

Women and Heart Disease: What They Need You to Tell Them—A Physician's Guide

Date: September 1st, 2006

This guide gives tips on starting a heart healthy conversation with patients and helps bridge the awareness gap about women and heart disease.

You can also share this quiz with your patients to help them learn more about their heart health.  That print quiz is also available on-line.



Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Date: October 4th, 2011

AHRQ Comments

Home > Aging Topics > Atrial Fibrillation > AHRQ Comments

October 14, 2011
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC
Mail Code: BICC
3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road
Portland, Oregon 97239-3098

RE: Comment on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation

Dear Sir or Madam:

Thank you for the opportunity to comment on AHRQ’s key questions related to the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness review of stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. We believe this is an important time to review in light of the growing impact atrial fibrillation has on our aging population and the uncertainty that exists about the best way to treat older patients with the condition.



Public Comments

AHRQ Submitted Comments on Key Questions for Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation--2012

Date: September 28th, 2012

September 28, 2012

Agency for Health Research and Quality
Effective Health Care Program
Scientific Resource Center, Oregon EPC Mail code: BICC 3181 S.W. Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Oregon 97239-3098
Re: Draft Report on Comparative Effectiveness Review (CER) of Stroke Prevention in Atrial
Fibrillation
 

Dear Sir or Madam,

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, was formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for older patients with AFib. We submitted comments to the Agency for Health Research and Quality (AHRQ) in October of 2011 on the importance of reviewing both stroke and bleeding risk assessment tools in the Effective Health Care Program’s comparative effectiveness study of stroke prevention in AFib, and we appreciate the opportunity to provide additional comments on the findings included in the draft report.



Public Comments

PCORI Submitted Comments on National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Date: March 5th, 2012

March 15, 2012

Joe V. Selby, M.D., M.P.H.
Executive Director
Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute
1701 Pennsylvania Ave, NW Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20006

RE: Comments on PCORI National Priorities for Research and Research Agenda

Dear Dr. Selby:

The groups below comprise a task force of leading organizations in the thrombosis space that are exploring issues related to optimal stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation. Participants in this task force represent various audiences—from patients to health care providers—that are unified by the desire to improve the way in which stroke and bleeding risk are assessed in atrial fibrillation patients and ensure proper treatment of these patients. In our capacity as health care stakeholders, we support the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute’s (PCORI) mission to improve health care delivery and outcomes by producing and promoting high integrity, evidence-based information that comes from research guided by patients, caregivers and the health care community. As such we appreciate the opportunity to comment on PCORI’s national research priorities and research agenda.



Public Comments

PQRS Submitted Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Date: September 4th, 2012

September 4, 2012

Marilyn Tavenner
Acting Administrator
 Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services
Department of Health and Human Services
Attn: CMS-1590-P P.O. Box 8013
Baltimore, MD 21244-8013

 RE: Comments on Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule

Dear Administrator Tavenner:

Because of the growing impact atrial fibrillation (AFib) is having on our aging population, the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force, comprised of 12 leading organizations in the thrombosis space, formed in 2011 to raise awareness of the impact of the disease and to explore issues related to the process used by healthcare providers to assess both stroke and bleeding risk in making decisions about anticoagulation therapy for patients with AFib. We appreciate the opportunity to comment on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ (CMS) Proposed Rule for Revisions to the 2013 Medicare Physician Fee Schedule. Our comments on the proposed rule will be limited to a new measure #1525, Chronic Anticoagulation Therapy, which is under consideration by CMS for inclusion in the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) for CY2013. Recent expert consensus led by the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force supports the use of this measure but with an additional recommendation to encourage routine and proper bleeding risk assessment. We urge you to include a modified version of measure #1525 in the final rule that encourages a bleeding risk assessment in addition to a stroke risk assessment to ensure that Medicare beneficiaries with AFib are presented with all treatment options that may be available for them.



Whitepaper

AFib Optimal Treatment Expert Roundtable--Effecting Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Anticoagulation Decision-Making

Date: January 1st, 2011

This roundtable explored the risk assessment tools and their limitations, discussed how the tools should be updated to overcome those limitations and to reflect the data from emerging therapies, formed consensus on what steps should be taken to address any proposed guideline changes and call for mandates, and considered how best to raise awareness amongst health care professionals on this expert consensus and the need for new best practices.

Read the consensus document that was produced as a result.







Fact Sheet

The Facts About AFib

Date: August 1st, 2011

The most common type of arrhythmia—or abnormal heart rhythm—atrial fibrillation (AFib) is a disorder of the heart’s electrical system that affects an estimated 2.3 to 5.6 million people in the US. During AFib episodes the heart’s upper chambers (the atria) beat irregularly and out of sync with the heart’s lower chambers (the ventricles). In some people these episodes come and go. In others they are chronic and occur regularly. In both cases, the arrhythmia itself isn’t generally serious; however, abnormal blood flow and strain to the heart can lead to serious medical conditions.

Download to learn more about what it means to have AFib, risk factors, treatment options, and making the right treatment decision for you.












Whitepaper

Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation—Consensus Statement

Date: July 1st, 2012

This expert consensus statement makes important recommendations on the use of stroke and bleeding risk tools, the decision to anticoagulate, the incorporation of patient preferences, and more.  Read an executive summary.

The experts include Mark J. Alberts, MD; Mary Amantangelo, MS, ACNP-BC, CCRN; Kenneth A. Bauer, MD; Lynne T. Braun, PhD, CNP, FAHA; Henry I. Bussey, PharmD; A. John Camm, MD, QHP, FRCP, FACC, FESC, FMedSci, FHRS, CStJ; David Garcia, MD; Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD; Jonathan L. Halperin, MD; Mellanie True Hills; Alan K. Jacobson, MD; Gregory Y.H. Lip, MD, FRCP, FESC, FACC; Edith A. Nutescu, PharmD, FCCP; Daniel E. Singer, MD; Albert L. Waldo, MD, FACC, FAHA, FHRS, FAACP



Whitepaper

Assessing Stroke and Bleeding Risk in Atrial Fibrillation--Consensus Statement Executive Summary

Date: December 1st, 2012

This executive summary shares the critical conclusions from the expert consensus statement that makes important recommendations on the use of stroke and bleeding risk tools, the decision to anticoagulate, the incorporation of patient preferences, and more.  Read the full consensus here

The experts include Mark J. Alberts, MD; Mary Amantangelo, MS, ACNP-BC, CCRN; Kenneth A. Bauer, MD; Lynne T. Braun, PhD, CNP, FAHA; Henry I. Bussey, PharmD; A. John Camm, MD, QHP, FRCP, FACC, FESC, FMedSci, FHRS, CStJ; David Garcia, MD; Samuel Z. Goldhaber, MD; Jonathan L. Halperin, MD; Mellanie True Hills; Alan K. Jacobson, MD; Gregory Y.H. Lip, MD, FRCP, FESC, FACC; Edith A. Nutescu, PharmD, FCCP; Daniel E. Singer, MD; Albert L. Waldo, MD, FACC, FAHA, FHRS, FAACP



Survey

Atrial Fibrillation Patient Survey—Highlights

Date: September 1st, 2012

This survey of more than 500 atrial fibrillation patients, ages 65+ from across the nation, revelead diagnosis and treatment experiences, information on anticoagulant use, stroke and bleeding risk discussions with health care professionals, and more.  It was conducted as part of the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force.

You can also read the FULL RESULTS.

 



Pocket Film

Heart Valve Disease in Women

Date: September 1st, 2014

Each year, as many as 5 million Americans are diagnosed with heart valve disease--a cardiovascular condition that affects men and women of all ages, but that becomes increasingly more common with age.  An estimated 1 in 50 women have valve disease--growing to 1 in 10 by age 75 and older.

This short "pocket film" teaches women more about valve disease--how you get it, how you detect it, and how you treat it.  

 



Health Care Professional Resources

Stroke Prevention in Atrial Fibrillation: A pocket guide to current guidelines and recommendations

Date: June 9th, 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) affects around 5% of patients age 65 and older and 10% of patients age 80 or older.  AFib is associated with a 5-fold risk of stroke so patients with AFib are often treated with anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy, both of which increase the risk of bleeding.  Examining individual patient risk factors can help providers manage bleeding risk while reducing risk of stroke in patients with AFib.  This pocket guide outlines the similarities and differences in current AFib guidelines, as well as efforts from major medical organizations to guide decision-making for stroke prevention in AFib (SPAF).



Fact Sheet

The Silver Book: Atrial Fibrillation fact sheet

Date: February 1st, 2013

Atrial fibrillation impacts between 2.7 and 6.1 million adults and can lead to stroke, heart failure, dementia, disability, and death. It also costs a tremendous amount of money--at least $6.65 billion each year. This latest factsheet from The Silver Book brings the leading data on the burden of the disease and the value of innovation to reduce that burden, all into one place.



Volume

The Silver Book: Thrombosis

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: March 11th, 2011

Each year around 75,000 Americans are diagnosed with AFib, 900,000 experience a VTE event, adn 800,000 have a stroke.  Some 2 million Americans die from thrombosis or its consequences.  The burden for those who survive is enormous and the cost of care a major expense for individuals and the nation.  Stroke alone costs around $73.7 billion annually.  Fortunately research advances are offering significant hope.  

This volume of The Silver Book shares the facts and statistics on the burden of thrombosis, as well as the progress and potential of research in the field.






Survey

Atrial Fibrillation Patient Survey—Full Results

Date: September 1st, 2012

This survey of more than 500 atrial fibrillation patients, ages 65+ from across the nation, revelead diagnosis and treatment experiences, information on anticoagulant use, stroke and bleeding risk discussions with health care professionals, and more.  It was conducted as part of the AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force.

You can also read the SURVEY HIGHLIGHTS.



Brochure

About Valve Disease: Talking with Your Doctor

Date: June 1st, 2010

This quick guide to talking wtih your doctor or health care professional about valve disease includes information for patients who think they may have a valve problem, as well as for those who know that they have a type of valve disease.  This resource can help make these important conversations a little bit easier.

A companion piece provides background information on valve disease and its treatment.

You can also visit the Alliance's Valve Disease page to learn more about valve disease, and Aortic Stenosis page to learn more about this common type of valve disease.



Brochure

Heart Valve Disease: Patient Information

Date: June 1st, 2010

This brochure includes basics on valve disease—what it is, how you get it, how you know you have it, and how it's diagnosed.  It also covers broad treatment options, what to expect after surgery, and a list of helpful resources.

A companion piece provides tips on starting a conversation with your health care professional about valve disease.

You can also visit the Alliance's Valve Disease page to learn more about valve disease, and Aortic Stenosis page to learn more about this common type of valve disease.



Public Comments

Comments on NHLBI Draft Strategic Research Priorities

Author: Afib Optimal Treatment Taskforce

Date: March 7th, 2016

Letter to the Office of Science Policy, Engagement, Education, and Communications (OSPEEC) at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) urging the Institute to include the Afib Optimal Treatment Task Force's critical challenge of developing an effective integrated bleeding risk assessment tool as part of the NHLBI's final Strategic Research Priorities. 



Public Comments

AFib Healthy People 2020 Letter

Author: AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force

Date: November 13th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research led AFib Optimal Treatment Task Force submitted a letter to the CDC commenting on the agency's Healthy People 2020 goals. The letter recommended:

  • The CDC should add Afib as a modifiable risk factor for stroke
  • The CDC address the under anticoagulation of older AFib patients as an emerging issue in heart disease and stroke





Public Comments

FY16 Afib Appropriations Sign-On Letter

Date: March 27th, 2015

The Alliance for Aging Research signed onto a letter requesting the National Institute on Aging (NIA), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and other relevant NIH agencies, institutes, and offices provide technical assistance and otherwise support an effort to improve prevention of AFib-related stroke in older persons.




Health Care Professional Resources

Celebrating a Year Without a Stroke: Tips for you to simply talk with your atrial fibrillation patients about stroke prevention

Date: September 12th, 2016

The risk of stroke from atrial fibrillation (AFib) is real, and can quickly change a patient's life. As you know, the scientific evidence confirms that oral anticoagulation is highly effective at reducing stroke risk. Yet, elderly patients are too often under-anticoagulted, owing in part to their lack of understanding about stroke risk and the value of anticoagulation. This tip sheet offers talking points to help health care professionals help their patients to better understand why anticoagulation is critical and how adherence will allow them to celebate more years without a stroke.

 



Pocket Film

Heart Healthy Aging with Nutrition

Author: Alliance for Aging Research

Date: March 7th, 2016

Like everything else in our bodies, the cardiovascular (CV) system goes through the aging process. We do know that there are things we can do, however, to positively impact our cardiovascular health. Watch this film to learn more about the aging of our CV system, research on bioactive compounds and how they may help maintain heart health, and a look at how cocoa flavanol supports healthy blood flow.   This film is the third in a series produced in partnership with Mars Center for Cocoa Health Science.  Learn more here.



Pocket Film

Living with and Preventing Stroke from Atrial Fibrillation

Date: December 16th, 2014

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) affects the way blood flows through the heart and makes it vulnerable for forming clots, which can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. The risk of stroke in a person with AFib is 500% higher than in someone without the disease, so treatment to reduce stroke risk is essential. Anticoagulants, also called blood thinners, can help reduce the risk of stroke. Fatal bleeding while on an anticoagulant is rare, and for most AFib patients, the benefit of preventing AFib caused strokes outweighs the increased risk of bleeding. To learn more about stroke risk and AFib, visit our website at www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation

­.

Atrial Fibrillation, also known as AFib, is the most common type of arrhythmia, or irregular heartbeat. An estimated 5 million Americans are currently living with AFib, and it becomes more common with age. AFib significantly increases a person’s risk of stroke, so it’s important to recognize its signs and symptoms and to seek treatment to reduce risk. However, it’s important to keep in mind that some people with AFib never experience symptoms, and are diagnosed when a health care professional detects an irregular heartbeat during a routine exam or during a visit for another health condition. Watch this short film to learn about the risk factors, causes, symptoms, and treatment options of AFib. For more information—including a patient brochure and quiz, visit our website at www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation.



Pocket Film

Cómo Prevenir una Apoplejía por Fibrilación Auricular

Date: December 16th, 2014

La fibrilación auricular (AFib) afecta la manera sangre fluye a través del corazón y lo hace vulnerable para la formación de coágulos, que pueden viajar al cerebro y causar un derrame cerebral. El riesgo de derrame cerebral en una persona con AFib es 500% más alto que en alguien sin la enfermedad, el tratamiento para reducir el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular es esencial. Anticoagulantes, también llamados anticoagulantes, pueden ayudar a reducir el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular. Tiempo hemorragia fatal en un anticoagulante es rara, y para la mayoría de los pacientes AFib, el beneficio de prevenir AFib causado accidentes cerebrovasculares supera el aumento del riesgo de sangrado. Para aprender más sobre el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular y AFib, visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/ atrialfibrillation.



Pocket Film

Cómo Vivir con el Tromboembolismo Venoso y Prevenir Coágulos Sanguíneos Mortales

Date: December 16th, 2014

El tromboembolismo venoso o TEV, es un término que incluye la trombosis venosa profunda y embolia pulmonar. TEV es común, y la mitad de todos los casos ocurren durante o poco después, una estancia en el hospital. Sin embargo, hay muchos factores, como el aumento de la edad que contribuyen a su riesgo de TEV . TEV es potencialmente peligrosa para la vida y se repite con frecuencia. Vea este cortometraje para averiguar los factores de riesgo, causas , síntomas y opciones de tratamiento de la ETV . Para obtener más información , incluyendo un folleto y concurso paciente , visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/VTE.



Pocket Film

Cómo Vivir con Fibrilación Auricular

Date: December 16th, 2014

Fibrilación auricular, también conocida como Fib A, es el tipo más común de arritmia, o latidos irregulares del corazón. Se estima que 5 millones de estadounidenses viven actualmente con AFib, y se vuelve más común con la edad. AFib aumenta significativamente el riesgo de accidente cerebrovascular de una persona, por lo que es importante reconocer sus signos y síntomas y buscar tratamiento para reducir el riesgo. Sin embargo, es importante tener en cuenta que algunas personas con FibA nunca experimentan síntomas, y se diagnostican cuando un profesional de la salud detecta un latido irregular del corazón durante un examen de rutina o durante una visita para otra condición de salud. Vea este cortometraje para aprender acerca de los factores de riesgo, causas, síntomas y opciones de tratamiento de AFib. Para obtener más información , incluyendo un folleto y concurso paciente , visite nuestro sitio web en www.agingresearch.org/atrialfibrillation.




Brochure

Living with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib)

Date: December 1st, 2014

Atrial fibrillation (also called AFib or AF) is the most common type of irregular heartbeat, or arrhythmia.  An estimated five million Americans are currently living with AFib. People with AFib have a higher risk of stroke, heart failure, dementia, other heart-related complications, and even death. Read this brochure to find out more about this condition.



Brochure

Living with Venous Thromboembolism (VTE)

Date: December 1st, 2014

Venous thromboembolism, or VTE, is a term that includes deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism.  It is common--affecting as many as 600,000 Americans.  While approximately half of all cases are related to hospitalization, there are numerous causes and risk factors that may cause VTE in non-hospitalized individuals.

VTE recurs (or happens again) frequently and can cause long-term complications and even death.  However, recognizing symptoms, seeking prompt medical attention, and getting proper treatment can significantly reduce complications and save your life.

Read this brochure to find out more about risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and more.

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